Photo of the Week
Peru 6-week
Photo Title


WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 124311
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-18 11:50:45
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-18 17:50:45
    [post_content] => Siwar Q’ente

When the Spanish arrived in the 1500s
they could not decipher the meanings of the quipu,
systems of strings that the Inka used to record information,
documenting history and knowledge in the knots like suspended brail.
Unable to speak the tethered language of this place,
the Spanish made fire and ash of the quipu.
I am here in Peru with my fluent Spanish and beard as thick as Pizarro’s
realizing I’m still lost in translation.

“You didn’t buy a ticket, nobody gets in free. Laws exist for a reason,
we Peruvians can’t just break them.”
The Wayna Picchu ticket clerk scolds our friend and local guide, Fabian.
Two hours earlier we were on the main platform outside the Machu Picchu entrance amidst a fog of tourists. I asked Fabian what he thought of all “this”, my hands spelling ‘locura’—craziness.

“My mind is not with all the people, it’s with the mountains,” he said,
gesturing toward the Apu, the gods in this peaks,
his eyes circling the sky like two condors climbing the spiral staircase of the wind.
But his stance was a twisted quipu, a tangle of body language
I couldn’t quite read,
the linguist in me frustrated.

I wondered if he was thinking of Q’eros, of his community in the mountains first settled 500 years ago by four of his ancestors fleeing
deep into the Andes to escape the Conquistadors.
They planted potatoes and built houses out of stone and straw. In Quechua, Q’eros means drinking vessel, this place despite its climate and terrain
could hold life, quench a longing to guard the prayers of ancestors.

400 years later, an American explorer named Bingham was shown Machu Picchu and Wayna Picchu by Peruvians living on them.
He then told the world he had discovered the site and wrongly declared it
“The Lost City of the Incas”, where they had made their last stand before final defeat by the Spanish.

That was 1911, and potatoes were still growing in Q’eros.
In 1981 Macchu Picchu was declared a “historical sanctuary”
by the Peruvian government.
In Q’eros, potatoes were growing eyes
in the mountains earthen womb,

and Machu Picchu was also growing eyes—blue ones, and green ones, and brown ones, and new walls made of brick,
roads with screeching buses, rails for howling trains,
and the moan of cappuccino machines.

And today at the Wayna Picchu ticket booth,
the clerks eyes grow wide and swell with judgment
as Fabian exits. There is no place to put his signature in the registry,
his name was not recorded, we had snuck him in earlier.

“This is a crime sir, I should call the police on you. Your name isn’t on the list because you don’t have a ticket.”
Here, the Apus require routers and routing numbers,
“Everyone knows you can only buy tickets online, we don’t sell them here,” she berates.

And as I watch how humbly he receives her words,
how a bouquet of bilingual apologies wilts on his tongue
as she calls him thief, and stupid, and shameful
in ways only her name-badge permits,

I am filled with righteous rage at this woman
with skin light enough to be mestiza, to assimilate,
to melt into the city’s arms, to always answer in Spanish
when spoken to in Quechua,
to slip on her heritage like an alpaca scarf when a tourist asks about the Inka.

I want to tell her that he could have written ‘Fabian’ in her little registration book
and it still wouldn’t be his name,
that his mother called him Siwar Q’ente, Sparkling Violetear, turquoise hummingbird, before his face first touched the sun
and her eyes turned away from it forever.
That this book reminds him of the first time he carried his name down to Cuzco,
wrote it in a little registration book and men in uniforms not unlike hers
made him Fabian instead.

I want to tell her about the registered guide I heard speaking
in the ruins’ grassy center, his hands pointing over rows of roofless houses.
“We believe this place was sacred for the Inka,
this here was a temple, that there was a field where they used to grow potatoes. They believed the mountains were Gods called Apu.”
His use of the past tense is formaldehyde soaking over the stone,
making this more cemetery than sanctuary.

I want to tell her that the tiger alive is too much fang and claw,
but once dead its striped beauty is a simple story of bravery,
its ferocity cold and comfortable to admire.

I want to tell this ticket clerk that this place is not dead to everyone,
but is flesh and spirit, that the gale of tourism turns the mountains here to darkening lanterns, leaky vessels, empty piles of rock.

I want to tell her that in Q’eros the mountains feel alive,
and the houses have roofs made of thatched straw,
they keep out the rain, the snow. They are woven tightly,
but every few years they require the miracle of human hands
to patch the holes, replace the leaves.

I want to tell her that 24 hours from now a hostel owner
will accuse Fabian, a 46 year-old amidst a group of 13 young travelers,
of stealing her money and cell phone,
calling him “The Man in the Hat.”

I want to tell her that Fabian, or Siwar, has been here before,
was invited even, by the Ministry of Culture to conduct a ceremony
at Machu Picchu, “Old Peak”, Wayna Picchu, “Young Peak,
land of roofless houses haunted by Bingham’s ghost.
Land of stolen ruins and foreign credit cards,
land of surrendered Inka.

I want to tell her that in Qu’eros they haven’t surrendered yet,
that Fabian is leader there, was President,
I want to tell her how he stood guard and rallied the people
when mining companies came
with all of the wires and routers and bank accounts,
thought they could buy a ticket.

I want to call her traitor , tell her “you don’t know this man!”
who’s laugh has crawled from graves, bathed in sickness,
who’s lived 6 bloody yesterdays and a wounded tomorrow
and still plays his flute every day of the week, every step of the trail
who’s lived enough hell to earn entrance into this place
where his ancestors prayed, where the Apus still speak to him in
faint voices.

You, pompous employee, condescending clerk,
YOU! You, you
might not be so different
from him. The two of you, both gatekeepers, fierce and unyielding.
Perhaps if history, if the human story, in all of its terror and beauty, had turned out
differently,

You would be fist-raised
shaming the mining empresario at the spot
where the dirt carretera meets the gaze of Kiku Grande,
where the mountains rise like dragon spines piercing through the earth,
maybe boys with spinning tops and mountain legs
and women with wooden looms would watch you
from in front of stone houses with thatched roofs

and laugh at the fear in the face of the man in the uniform
standing before you. Perhaps his eyes, filled with gilded conspiracies,
would blink and walk away at your words.
I was angry with you and could not
forgive your shaming of our friend

You, with skin dark enough to be mestiza,
or chola, or even indígena,
too dark to pass for Español, or European,
to pass through customs in my country without
questions or visas or green cards or
shame.

My skin, too light to fully understand what
it all means in your body or his,
even though I want to,
desperately,
want to understand enough to be loved
in an ancient language,
My heart,
a frayed quipu dying to be read.
    [post_title] => Siwar Q'ente
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => siwar-qente
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-02-08 16:17:06
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-08 23:17:06
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=124311
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 36
                    [name] => Best Notes From The Field
                    [slug] => best-notes-from-the-field
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 36
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => These pieces of travel writing are reflections by students and instructors traveling all over the world. They exemplify the open-minded spirit of exploration and self-discovery on a Dragons course.
                    [parent] => 0
                    [count] => 504
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 0
                    [cat_ID] => 36
                    [category_count] => 504
                    [category_description] => These pieces of travel writing are reflections by students and instructors traveling all over the world. They exemplify the open-minded spirit of exploration and self-discovery on a Dragons course.
                    [cat_name] => Best Notes From The Field
                    [category_nicename] => best-notes-from-the-field
                    [category_parent] => 0
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/best-notes-from-the-field/
                )

            [1] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Best Notes From The Field, Peru 6-week
)

Best Notes From The Field, Peru 6-week

View post

Siwar Q’ente

Kane Smego,Best Notes From The Field, Peru 6-week

Description

Siwar Q’ente When the Spanish arrived in the 1500s they could not decipher the meanings of the quipu, systems of strings that the Inka used to record information, documenting history and knowledge in the knots like suspended brail. Unable to speak the tethered language of this place, the Spanish made fire and ash of the […]

Posted On

08/18/15

Author

Kane Smego

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 124030
    [post_author] => 16
    [post_date] => 2015-08-08 04:37:01
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-08 10:37:01
    [post_content] => Dear friends and families,

The Peru group has departed from Cuzco and will arrive in Lima at 7 am local time.  The are scheduled to arrive in Miami at 4 pm later this afternoon.

Your children are coming home!

 

Best wishes,

Julianne
    [post_title] => Peru 6 Group is en route to Lima
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => peru-6-group-is-en-route-to-lima
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-08 04:37:01
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-08 10:37:01
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=124030
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Peru 6-week
)

Peru 6-week

View post

Peru 6 Group is en route to Lima

Julianne Chandler,Peru 6-week

Description

Dear friends and families, The Peru group has departed from Cuzco and will arrive in Lima at 7 am local time.  The are scheduled to arrive in Miami at 4 pm later this afternoon. Your children are coming home!   Best wishes, Julianne

Posted On

08/8/15

Author

Julianne Chandler

Category

Peru 6-week

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 123940
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-07 15:22:32
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-07 21:22:32
    [post_content] => There is no single way to describe Peru. Each person has their own story and every place its own complex history. I’ve seen tall snowy mountains and deep green forests. I’ve experienced traditional Andean ceremonies and visited towns where I`ve been offered a free pisco sour (which I did not drink!) and massage in return for my business. In fact, every few days I visited a drastically different Peru. In Puerto Moldonado, I saw the great effects of mining on the Amazonian region. While it’s a source of income for so many who might otherwise be jobless, it is also destroying and polluting one of the most beautiful places on earth. Only a short time later, we trekked Ausongate. This mountainous region differed so greatly from Puerto Moldonado. Here, the people gain their strength and wisdom from the mountains around them. They believe in cosmovision and thank the Apus for all they have been provided. These regions are so contrasting it`s hard to believe they are even in the same country. These contrasting experiences have helped me understand that nothing is black and white. A country can have qualities that are beautiful, scary, saddening, and uplifting. Peru does not have one single story and its beauty lies in its complexity.
    [post_title] => Peru is...
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => flag-peru-is
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-07 15:22:32
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-07 21:22:32
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=123940
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Peru 6-week
)

Peru 6-week

View post

Peru is…

Chila Haber,Peru 6-week

Description

There is no single way to describe Peru. Each person has their own story and every place its own complex history. I’ve seen tall snowy mountains and deep green forests. I’ve experienced traditional Andean ceremonies and visited towns where I`ve been offered a free pisco sour (which I did not drink!) and massage in return […]

Posted On

08/7/15

Author

Chila Haber

Category

Peru 6-week

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 123971
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-07 10:10:58
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-07 16:10:58
    [post_content] => Perú es... la tierra prometida de la que todos hablan.
Perú es...un país rico en cultura, representado por su gastronomía, agricultura y vestimenta.
Perú es... un país lleno de perseverancia por aferrarse a sus dialectos y costumbres.
Perú es... el lugar donde puedes encontrar unas de las mejores maravillas del mundo incluyéndote a ti mismo.
Perú es...uno de los lugares que tiene a las personas mas humildes que e conocido, las personas te abren las puertas de sus casas sin preguntar nada a cambio.
Perú es... un país histórico seguido por su arte y el amor hacia la artesanía y tapestria.
Perú es... uno de los producidores mas grandes de café.
Perú es... un país lleno de alegría y de colores, en cualquier esquina que vayas te deleitas la pupila en tanta variedad de colores.
    [post_title] => Peru Es...
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => peru-es
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-07 10:10:58
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-07 16:10:58
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=123971
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Peru 6-week
)

Peru 6-week

View post

Peru Es…

Carla Cardenas Cardenas,Peru 6-week

Description

Perú es… la tierra prometida de la que todos hablan. Perú es…un país rico en cultura, representado por su gastronomía, agricultura y vestimenta. Perú es… un país lleno de perseverancia por aferrarse a sus dialectos y costumbres. Perú es… el lugar donde puedes encontrar unas de las mejores maravillas del mundo incluyéndote a ti mismo. […]

Posted On

08/7/15

Author

Carla Cardenas Cardenas

Category

Peru 6-week

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 123939
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-06 22:16:41
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:16:41
    [post_content] => I was once told that every time I see a butterfly it is my Auntie Sandra letting me know she is there with me. My auntie died of cancer only in her 30s, too soon to be gone. I knew in my heart, however, that it would not be the last time I would be in her presence.

The butterfly, also known in Spanish as La Mariposa, is found in many sacred Andean weavings and textiles. It is considered a creature of great beauty, and for me, hope.

The first time I saw the butterfly was in Huacaria. Huacaria was our first homestay on this trip. I was feeling afraid, alone, and not welcomed at first. I didn’t know what I was doing there, and I found myself aching to go home.  It was 5:45 a.m., and I was awake to begin my day. I didn’t want to be awake, and I just wanted the day to be over. I felt trapped, and that my home just didn’t exist. I guess I was just feeling so negative and low because I was so far away from home for the first time, and I didn’t know where to begin. I think my aunt sensed my desperation because in just a blink of an eye I saw a butterfly… there and gone. It was only there for a millisecond, but I felt so relieved because I knew she was there protecting me, and that everything was going to be alright.

The 2nd time I saw the butterfly was at the top of Ausangate. 3rd day into the trek, and I was past the point of exhaustion. IT was all white around me. White snow on the floor, white snow falling from the sky, and white mist covered everything in my view. Life itself felt non-existent. I felt like I just couldn’t go any further, and I needed to just stop where I was and give up. I think my aunt sensed my desperation because in just a blink of an eye I saw one single butterfly… there and gone. Besides a few snow covered plants, life felt nonexistent in my sight except for that one colorful butterfly. I knew I was protected, and that everything was going to be alright.

The last time I saw the butterfly was only a few days ago on our way to Machu Picchu. I was carrying my big backpack, and was walking along the train tracks to our camping destination. There were so MANY butterflies. It didn’t feel right, or special to me. I didn’t feel protected. How would my aunt be every single butterfly?? I didn’t know if I could climb up to Machu Picchu… I was again felt very lost. I think my aunt sensed my hoplessness because in that very moment one, single butterfly landed on my shoulder, and just stayed there. Only one butterfly on my right shoulder. I stared at it for a good 2 minutes and felt relieved. I knew I was protected, and that everything was going to be alright.

Here in Peru, I observed that family is one of the most important gifts of life. Everywhere I go, whether it is in Huacaria, the villages of Queros, or a small local market in Cusco, the presence of family here is so prevalent. The families here only need each other, and each other’s love to be happy, and I realized that the love of a family is never ending. Whether the person is physically or not physically here, their love is everlasting. This trip has made me realize how important my family is, and how important it is for me to continue creating strong relationships with my family, and give back the love they always give me.

This idea of energy being manifested in nature is a huge aspect of Andean cosmovision. Throughout this trip I felt I have really resonated with this concept. In Andean cosmovision they believe that once a family member dies, there energy remains on earth somehow manifested in an object of nature. Seeing the butterfly and feeling the presence of my aunt made me feel connected with this idea of cosmovision.

While this trip has been extremely challenging in many ways, I never regretted any moment. I am so thankful for this experience, and for the ways I have been pulled out of my comfort zone in so many directions. Seeing the butterfly, thinking about family, and thinking about cosmovision… I realize how beautiful life is. Despite the conflicts and struggles we see and deal with every day, there is so much to be grateful for, and so much to celebrate. I am sad this trip is coming to its end, but I know the memories and relationships we have all made will last a lifetime.
    [post_title] => 3 Times I saw the Butterfly
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => 3-times-i-saw-the-butterfly
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-06 22:16:41
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:16:41
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=123939
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Peru 6-week
)

Peru 6-week

View post

3 Times I saw the Butterfly

Yasmeen Faisal,Peru 6-week

Description

I was once told that every time I see a butterfly it is my Auntie Sandra letting me know she is there with me. My auntie died of cancer only in her 30s, too soon to be gone. I knew in my heart, however, that it would not be the last time I would be […]

Posted On

08/6/15

Author

Yasmeen Faisal

Category

Peru 6-week

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 123938
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-06 22:13:40
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:13:40
    [post_content] => In the West, the focus is on 'I'. What can I take away from this situation? What can I gain from it? Coming into Q'eros I had this mentality. What am I getting out of this situation? What will I take away from it? During our first homestay, my host dad gave us his bed. Immediately, I felt grateful. I felt humbled. I felt privelleged. The focus is on the I.

I pulled out my sleeping bag, my headlamp, my book, and settled into bed. I was appreciative of everything that I got out of the situation. MY new sense of gratitude and humility for what seem to some like the little things, MY realisations, but I never stopped to think about what impact I was leaving. I never stopped to ask the right questions. "What experience are they having? How are they affected by my being here?" The focus was on the I.

I never stopped to think about how it felt for them to see me take out my sleeping bag, basically saying that the bed that they sleep in everyday wasn't good enough. How it felt for them when I brought out my headlamp even though they provided us wih the one light that they use everynight.

The biggest lesson that Q'eros taught me wasn't to be grateful for everything that I have, which it did, or to be more humble, which it did, but rather than I need to take the focus off the I. In Q'eros, yes, but more so in life. Being able to think about what I can bring to a situation before thinking about what I can take, and thinking about how I'm affecting a situation before I think about how it's affecting me. I'm learning to bring the focus off the I.
    [post_title] => Last Yak
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => last-yak-4
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-06 22:13:40
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:13:40
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=123938
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Peru 6-week
)

Peru 6-week

View post

Last Yak

Tumi Moloto,Peru 6-week

Description

In the West, the focus is on ‘I’. What can I take away from this situation? What can I gain from it? Coming into Q’eros I had this mentality. What am I getting out of this situation? What will I take away from it? During our first homestay, my host dad gave us his bed. […]

Posted On

08/6/15

Author

Tumi Moloto

Category

Peru 6-week

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 123941
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-06 22:11:37
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:11:37
    [post_content] => The earth is sacred to the people of the Andes is what we experienced in Queros.  We performed a ceremony atop a hill outside the town of Cochamarka by creating a mesa (table) with offerings.  Half was dedicated to the Pachamama (Mother Earth) and half to Tayta Inti (Father Sun).  On Pachamama’s side were sweet things like candy, for she enjoys sugar, as well as three cocoa leaves per person.  Favian, the leader of the ceremony, asked for good luck, strength and kindness in each of our futures.  We then burned the mesa to deliver our offerings to her.

The earth is sacred to the people of the Andes, a woman named Holly Wissler told us in Cuzco, she is an ethnomusicologist that told us about her 3 decades of work in Queros studying their music.  She taught us about how they give ceremonies to the earth, ask it for forgiveness and for good crops in the coming season.  The people of the Andes have a connection to the earth seldom found today.  With all the cars, airplanes and electric plants ruining our Mother Earth in our large cities, here in the rural villages of Queros, the only scar on the landscape is the often dysfunctional town radio tower.  They have such a respect for the earth that we have lost in other places.

The earth is sacred to the people of the Andes is what I found out while walking behind Favian who plays his flute whenever we hike anywhere.  At first I thought he simply liked to play and hear the sound.  Then I thought maybe he thinks we enjoy the sound.  However, while hiking the last day in Queros, I realized he doesn’t play just to play, he is playing to the mountains, to the rivers and to the fields.  He plays to the Apus (mountain gods), and to Pachamama.  He plays to ask for forgiveness for his mistakes, and to ask permission for the future.  He plays to tell them how much he cares for them and respects them.

The earth is sacred to the people of the Andes is what was indirectly told to us by Favian in Santa Teresa.   He told us a story about how a mining company had come to the largest town in Queros and asked to mine the local sacred mountain.  The company paid off 8 of the local men to convince the rest of the town to say yes to the mining company.  As soon as Favian caught wind of it, he said he wanted to cry, that is how meaningful and special these mountains are.  Because of Favian, the mining company was stopped before any major damage was done, but there is now a paved road up the mountain.  Favian tells us that every time he sees the road his heart sinks.

The earth is sacred to the people of the Andes is something that this group will forever remember and respect.  The earth is everything to these people, and that kind of respect for the earth is not found in many places of the world.  I respect the earth much more now that I have experienced Queros, but I will never be anywhere near that of the people of the Andes.
    [post_title] => The earth is sacred to the people of the Andes
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => the-earth-is-sacred-to-the-people-of-the-andes
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-06 22:11:37
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:11:37
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=123941
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Peru 6-week
)

Peru 6-week

View post

The earth is sacred to the people of the Andes

Brody Swanner,Peru 6-week

Description

The earth is sacred to the people of the Andes is what we experienced in Queros.  We performed a ceremony atop a hill outside the town of Cochamarka by creating a mesa (table) with offerings.  Half was dedicated to the Pachamama (Mother Earth) and half to Tayta Inti (Father Sun).  On Pachamama’s side were sweet […]

Posted On

08/6/15

Author

Brody Swanner

Category

Peru 6-week

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 123942
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-06 22:09:45
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:09:45
    [post_content] => munaycha apu

 

Apu Ausangate-

streaked with ice and snow,

spotted with shrubs and small white and yellow flowers.

shaping windflow - shaping me,

through dust that coats my pants and lungs,

windburn that strikes my raw cheeks.

eyelashes, eyebrows, and lips frozen,

hiding from blows of wind behind chilled rocks.

as the mountains fade one by one

to the snow clouds the valley went to hours ago.

trying not to collapse under biting air,

we walk up the pass and push ourselves through.

stacked stone towers greet us,

foreshadowing a new beginning

and understanding hardships of the journey here-

while honoring the transition

and the hope in the present.

 

munaycha apu.

 

walking side by side through the Andes

we mesh, supporting one another.

one machine, one dragons team.

yet as individuals we travel alone,

living in our own realities,

we view the world differently.

 

munaycha apu.

 

coca leaves are our gateway to the earth-

helping us form the words and sentences

to be heard by the great Apus.

they guide us along the twisting

spiritual path we embark on, while

holding hands and chanting

as clouds roll in on mountian tops

and white out the world below.

i'm left leaning on the notes

from Fabian's flute and

the crackle of a fire burning

our offering to the Pacha Mama.

 

munaycha apu.

 

like the women in queros

weaving their tales into textiles,

I weave my reality into words;

into art, and intricate drawings.

my interpretation of the world we live in

displayed in patterns, in swirles, in circles.

sparking new interpretations and stories

in each of those who view it.

one story of me

mixing into a multitude of stories

we live in-

forming into colors, shapes, objects

tangible and untangible.

forming us, forming the earth

we are born to,

connected to,

grown to.

 

munaycha apu

 

my palms are cracked and caked with dirt,

they're lined with herbs and sages,

amd creased from slaps

and balled-up fists.

dotted from the sun

and white as the moon,

calloused along ridges.

mimicking my feet that memorize the dirt supporting me,

while my hands learn the shapes of trees surrounding me,

as my eyes view the sky stretching above me.

 

an ever-stretching curiosity.

 

munaycha apu.
    [post_title] => munaycha apu (beautiful mountain)
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => munaycha-apu-beautiful-mountain
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-06 22:09:45
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:09:45
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=123942
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 36
                    [name] => Best Notes From The Field
                    [slug] => best-notes-from-the-field
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 36
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => These pieces of travel writing are reflections by students and instructors traveling all over the world. They exemplify the open-minded spirit of exploration and self-discovery on a Dragons course.
                    [parent] => 0
                    [count] => 504
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 0
                    [cat_ID] => 36
                    [category_count] => 504
                    [category_description] => These pieces of travel writing are reflections by students and instructors traveling all over the world. They exemplify the open-minded spirit of exploration and self-discovery on a Dragons course.
                    [cat_name] => Best Notes From The Field
                    [category_nicename] => best-notes-from-the-field
                    [category_parent] => 0
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/best-notes-from-the-field/
                )

            [1] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Best Notes From The Field, Peru 6-week
)

Best Notes From The Field, Peru 6-week

View post

munaycha apu (beautiful mountain)

Ellie Goldstein ,Best Notes From The Field, Peru 6-week

Description

munaycha apu   Apu Ausangate- streaked with ice and snow, spotted with shrubs and small white and yellow flowers. shaping windflow – shaping me, through dust that coats my pants and lungs, windburn that strikes my raw cheeks. eyelashes, eyebrows, and lips frozen, hiding from blows of wind behind chilled rocks. as the mountains fade […]

Posted On

08/6/15

Author

Ellie Goldstein

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 123954
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-06 22:08:40
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:08:40
    [post_content] => If I could sum up Peru in one sentence, it would be this: Peru is complicated. There's really no more accurate way to put it into one phrase. Just like any other country, be it the U.S. or India, there is no single version of Peru. As Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie puts it, there is no "single story" to any place or its people. So, Peru is beautiful. It's filled with massive, snowy peaks, rich jungles, and sprawling cities. On the other hand, Peru is also ugly. Many of its populations, both rural and urban, are in extreme poverty; much of its land is contaminated by the harsh mercury of mining, its mountain communities and precious rainforests destroyed under the greedy hand of capitalism. Peru is colorful, its landcape rich with flowers and grasses, its homes adorned with handmade textiles. Peru is grey. Some of its cities appear to exist entirely of cement admist the thick, smoggy air. If I have learned one thing here, its that nothing is black and white. We are constantly categorizing and organizing or thoughts into neat little boxes, when in reality the world exists entirely in the grey spaces in between. For example, mining is bad becase it polltes land, air and water with neurotoxins, all while relocating entire communites in order to exploit their land. But the story doesn't end there. Mining is good because it provides jobs to countless people without any other options, all while giving us everything from our cars to our camera phones and even our doorknobs. The nearly untouched communities of the high Andes are good because they preserve direct lineage and Incan culture that would have otherwise been lost. These communities are bad because they have little access to things like medical care and a good education, and they thrust people into poverty and a single-crop diet that may want something more from their life than just "preserving culture." So Peru is great, and Peru is terrible. Peru is wealthy, and Peru is poor. Peru is rich with wonderful history, and Peru is still dealing with the scars of colonization. Peru is approximately 512,000 square miles filled with 30 of the world's 32 climates, a country 30.38 million individuals each with an entirely different story. All of these things exist at once and are all being played out at the exact same time. It would be much simpler to tell you that Peru is good or Peru is bad, but that just doesn't reflect reality. Peru is wonderfully, brutally, humanly complicated, and that's about as close as you can get to describing anything in one sentence.
    [post_title] => What is Peru, really?
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => what-is-peru-really
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-06 22:08:40
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:08:40
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=123954
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Peru 6-week
)

Peru 6-week

View post

What is Peru, really?

Clara Zervigon,Peru 6-week

Description

If I could sum up Peru in one sentence, it would be this: Peru is complicated. There’s really no more accurate way to put it into one phrase. Just like any other country, be it the U.S. or India, there is no single version of Peru. As Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie puts it, there is no […]

Posted On

08/6/15

Author

Clara Zervigon

Category

Peru 6-week

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 123955
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-08-06 22:06:39
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:06:39
    [post_content] => Peru is plantains, fried eggs and rice

the sound of car horns along winding roads to places I will never know well enough

tents coated in a layer of dew

glasses coated in a layer of dust - kicked up by passing mules

condors, pumas, and snakes

Peru is the smell of smoke

nothing like I expected

everthing that I could have hoped

it is the survival, the contrast, the adaptation

of cultures

it is sunrises and sunsets and sungates and sundials

feeling at home when you are miles from it

Peru is approximately 90 microclimates

a rainforest, a mountain range, a coast

it is a wayno - lyrics that speak grievances of a people still foreign to me

but a little closer now, than before

stone statues that mark another pass on another mountain

another god

the highest I have ever been on this earth

the closest I have been to touching the stars

a constellation so blinding that its story has survived light years

Peru is life in a cloud

with one source of light, two parents, three pots

florescent colors dotting Sunday markets

tourism and heritage

life and death

and the understanding that death is a part of life

Peru is constantly changing

gone before I have begun to say hello

and it will be missed
    [post_title] => All Too Impossible Summary
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => all-too-impossible-summary
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-08-06 22:06:39
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-08-07 04:06:39
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=123955
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 75
                    [name] => Peru 6-week
                    [slug] => peru-6-week
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 75
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 255
                    [count] => 107
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 5.1
                    [cat_ID] => 75
                    [category_count] => 107
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Peru 6-week
                    [category_nicename] => peru-6-week
                    [category_parent] => 255
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2015/peru-6-week/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Peru 6-week
)

Peru 6-week

View post

All Too Impossible Summary

Marley Loveman-Brown,Peru 6-week

Description

Peru is plantains, fried eggs and rice the sound of car horns along winding roads to places I will never know well enough tents coated in a layer of dew glasses coated in a layer of dust – kicked up by passing mules condors, pumas, and snakes Peru is the smell of smoke nothing like […]

Posted On

08/6/15

Author

Marley Loveman-Brown

Category

Peru 6-week

1 2 3 11