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    [post_date] => 2014-08-10 10:51:45
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    [post_content] => 10:25pm Thursday
I should probably be sleeping right now as preparation for our early departure from El Lagartillo tomorrow, but I am too energized from our farewell potluck dinner and dance party. These four days in this town have been (and I hope I don't sound like I'm exaggerating!) earth-shattering. Let me tell you about the exact moment that my earth shattered.

After arriving in town in the afternoon, meeting my host family (an older couple named Francisca and Marcelino), having a polite dinner, and spending an evening listening to the town band, Los Rusticos, perform at the community center, I slept soundly in my cozy bedroom. I woke up to have a polite breakfast and then met up with the Dragons group for a tour of town. Our instructors warned us to prepare ourselves for the emotional content, as this town has a painful history.

Our tour guide Ermilinda described to us how the community came to be, and what the early years of communal living were like. We walked to the school yard, stopping to say hi to a few of the children who excitedly yelled out names of their Dragons friends who were staying in their houses, and paused in the middle of the courtyard. Ermilinda told us how the Contra wanted to destroy the things that mattered most to the revolutionary communities, such as education. She gestured to two crosses in the courtyard and told us that they are for the two school children, both 15 years old, who were murdered by the Contra the day they invaded the town in 1984. My heart sank trying to imagine the devastation to the community, and I prepared myself to move on to the next spot in our tour. But first, Ermelinda pulled me aside and (in Spanish) asked my name and if I was the one staying with Francisca and Marcelino. In my head I translated the next thing she said to me as she pointed at one of the memorials: "Es el hijo de Francisca y Marcelino." I felt like I had been hit in the stomach and immediately, and without my permission, tears poured down my cheeks. These two lovely people who were hosting me and who had sat with me at meals and had been so kind... their son was murdered by the Contra army.

The reason I'm writing about this is not just to share the sadness, but rather to share the incredible resilience that I have experienced in this community. Today, Francisca and Marcelino's house is a warm, bustling place with a constant flow of friends, sons, and grandsons in and out. One of their sons lives with his family next door and pops over for dinner and conversation often. Grandchildren run in and hop into Grandma's lap for a hug and a kiss and maybe a banana for a snack before they run back out into the street to chase their friends.

Last night our instructors asked us to read a speech by Ivan Illich called "To Hell With Good Intentions" about how ineffective and downright damaging people can be when they travel to a "less fortunate" place in order to "help," because this often manifests as an attempted seduction of the developing world into the American value system of wealth, privacy, and capitalism. After living for four days in the warmth of El Lagartillo, I will close this post with a line from the speech that now makes a lot of sense to me: "Perhaps this is the moment to instead bring home to the people of the U.S. the knowledge that the way of life they have chosen simply is not alive enough to be shared."
- Casey
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Nicaragua Educator

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From El Lagartillo

Casey,Nicaragua Educator

Description

10:25pm Thursday I should probably be sleeping right now as preparation for our early departure from El Lagartillo tomorrow, but I am too energized from our farewell potluck dinner and dance party. These four days in this town have been (and I hope I don’t sound like I’m exaggerating!) earth-shattering. Let me tell you about […]

Posted On

08/10/14

Author

Casey

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    [post_content] => I love to travel. I like observing new people, places, and things. The new foods, the new smells, how families interact with each other, the cultural norms, all intrigue me. Growing up in a typical New England family, everything seems new and exciting, no matter my age.

In my early 20s, travel was about seeing the sights, drinking at the pubs, and having a very simple experience, However, the more I traveled, the more I realized the importance of digging deeper. I no longer wanted to be a person who just checked countries off a list. Instead, I wanted the more authentic experience. What is life really like in this country? What can I learn from the people who live there? What can I learn about myself? As a result, my travel has become more meaningful and the experience more memorable.

I have lived with a family in Cambodia and now am sitting at the kitchen table in a home in Nicaragua. The mother is working on creating a birthday cake for her husband, hand-grinding chocolate and the father is making hummus. Their son is napping, after a long day of birthday excitement and getting sand and gravel with his father. I hear the game of volleyball being played by the children in the background. We have shared conversations of our families, occupations, politics, and other topics. I have contributed to family meals and clean-up. I have redefined my notion of family, community, and simplicity, which will come home with me. None of this is possible unless you move away from being a tourist and become a traveler.

It is important to combine both. I don't begrudge people who want to see the Eiffel Tower, take a gondola ride in Venice, or see the Great Wall. I have done those things and still do. Those are extremely important in a different way, Instead, I urge tourists to become travelers. Step out of the comfort zone of city hotels, private transportation, and other comforts. Stay with a family and get to know how they live, learn from their personal histories, share your experiences, take a breath from the hustle of seeing many countries and concentrate on learning about the people of one.
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Nicaragua Educator

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Thoughts on Travel

Sara,Nicaragua Educator

Description

I love to travel. I like observing new people, places, and things. The new foods, the new smells, how families interact with each other, the cultural norms, all intrigue me. Growing up in a typical New England family, everything seems new and exciting, no matter my age. In my early 20s, travel was about seeing […]

Posted On

08/10/14

Author

Sara

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    [post_date] => 2014-08-08 09:08:13
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    [post_content] => 8:30pm - El Lagartillos - It is dark now. No more discussions of water shortage in town. The roosters and hens are quiet. My host family (Alcides, Carla y ellos hijos Roniel, Greybim, and Alciditos) has gone to bed. The hum of carrahchatta keeps me company as I type away. For most of the year, I am a science teacher and global citizenship committee member at a high school on Long Island, NY. But here in Nicaragua, I am Jose. Some invisible scissors had spliced me into pieces and all I could do was stare at them as they rest on the dirt floor.

Where to begin...I will pick up my heaviest piece first.

Every person is taught their own of definition of home, consciously or subconsciously, from a very early age. For some, it is a matter of, well, matter; red bricks, carved tree branches, old kitchen tables, and creaky rocking chairs. So when my parents called me three years ago and asked me how I felt about them selling our house in upstate New York and moving to a house in South Carolina, I froze. But I didn't care about the stuff; we had moved with my two younger sisters four times before that and I had personally moved eight times since high school. Heck, my collection of moving boxes is older than my upper deck baseball card collection. At first I thought, I won't miss that house. And I felt my own selfish pride. I was proud that my parents felt confident in my ability to redefine home once more. Some awful coming-of-age ceremony was taking place and I was standing on the podium. But the single seed crystal that solidifies your thoughts and changes the course of your life is often unexpected. I froze. I thought, "If there is no house, what is home? Where is it?" And then I wondered about other families and their definitions of home. And if their are other versions of home, why haven't I seen them? And so I find myself in the small community of El Lagartillos, Nicaragua, searching for those answers.

This is the magic of the Dragon's Educator Experience. A small group of teachers with exceptional instructors, together spiraling through the meta-experience of learning course design while experiencing it firsthand. Shared mental models of global citizenship, awareness of self and leadership/skill building begin to coalesce as we move through the experiential learning project components (homestays, rugged travel, trekking, service learning, surveys of development, independent service projects, language study, comparative religion, and a specific focus of inquiry for each region). In my eight years of teaching, I have never had such an integrated, engaging, and reflective learning experience.
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Best Notes From The Field, Nicaragua Educator

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What does “home” mean to you?

Joe Helpern,Best Notes From The Field, Nicaragua Educator

Description

8:30pm – El Lagartillos – It is dark now. No more discussions of water shortage in town. The roosters and hens are quiet. My host family (Alcides, Carla y ellos hijos Roniel, Greybim, and Alciditos) has gone to bed. The hum of carrahchatta keeps me company as I type away. For most of the year, […]

Posted On

08/8/14

Author

Joe Helpern

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    [post_date] => 2014-08-04 09:23:29
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-08-04 15:23:29
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I was awoken by a disconcerting deep space like roaring sound coming from the forest outside our cabin this morning. It repeated itself over and over with the roaring sound echoing across the mountains. Roars answered by other roars. It should have been a frightening sound, but I wanted to know the sound instead of hiding from it. Fortunately for me, I am with a group of educators that want to explore what may seem like frightening experiences, seeking out intimidating growling sounds in the cover of night and feeling exhilarated by it, instead of shying away from it. And so we went monkey  stalking.  And though we didn't find the howler monkeys, we did find friendship, awe, beauty, peacefulness, and memories. Who will forget monkey stalking in the Selva Negra? I dare say no one.
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Nicaragua Educator

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Searching for Monkeys

Laura Bridges-Pereira,Nicaragua Educator

Description

I was awoken by a disconcerting deep space like roaring sound coming from the forest outside our cabin this morning. It repeated itself over and over with the roaring sound echoing across the mountains. Roars answered by other roars. It should have been a frightening sound, but I wanted to know the sound instead of […]

Posted On

08/4/14

Author

Laura Bridges-Pereira

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    [post_date] => 2014-08-03 14:22:51
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When we walked into the Mercedes Hotel in Managua yesterday morning we knew we were in for a treat. The excitement of hosting a group of educators in Nicaragua had been building in us for days as we planned our presentations and activities. We were greeted by an enthusiastic group of energetic and engaged teachers who had made the journey here because they believe that experiential education has something for them and their students. We spent the morning getting to know one another and outlining our vision for this program. We learned a lot about each others motivations and goals and the tremendous amount of experience and knowledge that each person was bringing to the table. As facilitators we feel that what we have to offer is a map, a map of where we’ve been with students and what the terrain felt like to us. Because we believe that a map is only useful to a person who knows how to read it we also offer our experience and the tools we’ve used to interpret it. The actual walking on the terrain will be done by each individual, and the paths they make will be unique. To honor that we began our experience by reading a poem by the Spanish poet Antonio Machado which says, “Caminante, no hay camino, se hace camino al andar....” “Traveler, there is no path, paths are made by walking....” For the next ten days we will all walk together, making our own path, exploring our questions together. We look forward to expanding our maps and we can’t wait to see where we all end up. [post_title] => Paths Are Made By Walking [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => paths-made-walking [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-02 10:11:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-02 17:11:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=107645 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 156 [name] => Nicaragua Educator [slug] => nicaragua-educator [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 156 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 254 [count] => 18 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 8.1 [cat_ID] => 156 [category_count] => 18 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Nicaragua Educator [category_nicename] => nicaragua-educator [category_parent] => 254 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2014/nicaragua-educator/ ) ) [category_links] => Nicaragua Educator )
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Paths Are Made By Walking

Dhyana and Luis,Nicaragua Educator

Description

When we walked into the Mercedes Hotel in Managua yesterday morning we knew we were in for a treat. The excitement of hosting a group of educators in Nicaragua had been building in us for days as we planned our presentations and activities. We were greeted by an enthusiastic group of energetic and engaged teachers who […]

Posted On

08/3/14

Author

Dhyana and Luis

WP_Post Object
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    [post_date] => 2014-07-29 11:36:01
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-29 17:36:01
    [post_content] => Hi Everyone!  Sorry for the late introduction, but better late than never, I suppose!

My name is Casey (officially known as: Catherine) and I am a science teacher at a Quaker School on Long Island, NY.  Originally from Maryland and Virginia.  I speak SOME spanish and have been doing some serious cram sessions with Rosetta Stone in the past few weeks.  I think I'm starting to finally understand the difference between preterite and imperfect.

I'm glad that Sara mentioned her dog Hobo because that means we can commiserate about how much we miss our pups while we're on this trip!!  My dog Jack is laying his head in my lap as I type this.

I'll be traveling into Managua on the 1st with Joe Helpern, who is a colleague of mine and who introduced himself on this board a few days ago.  We have both been working for the past few years with our school's Global Studies committee and are looking forward to bringing a lot of information and inspiration back to our colleagues after this experience.  I am especially thrilled to learn more about how to plan courses and lead trips for my students that are in line with the Quaker values of Simplicity, Equality, and Peace.   I also believe deeply in the power of the natural environment to make experiences that much deeper for students (and teachers).

Can't wait!

-Casey
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Nicaragua Educator

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Just a few more days!

Casey Reed,Nicaragua Educator

Description

Hi Everyone!  Sorry for the late introduction, but better late than never, I suppose! My name is Casey (officially known as: Catherine) and I am a science teacher at a Quaker School on Long Island, NY.  Originally from Maryland and Virginia.  I speak SOME spanish and have been doing some serious cram sessions with Rosetta […]

Posted On

07/29/14

Author

Casey Reed

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-28 09:05:07
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-28 15:05:07
    [post_content] => Saludos and hellos to the group of you who, next Saturday, will join me and Luis here in Nicaragua.
Ah, where to begin…perhaps I should begin by telling you of this country I call home, because it has been that to me for half my lifetime; but you will soon be met with the unbreakable spirit of this nation yourselves, perhaps no explanation is necessary.

Perhaps then, I should tell you that Nicaragua is a place our students have experienced as having an unmistakable sense of pride emanating from its people. But many of this country’s stories are not mine to tell, when you get here you’ll find this land and its people speak well for themselves, and we have only to listen.

Stories are important; even our own. Perhaps I should start with me then, with my story, which begins with a girl who started out, not exactly in any of Nicaragua’s jungles, but instead in New York’s. Now the New York of the 80’s, the one I knew, is scarcely the one we know today—any more than Nicaragua in the 90’s, at the time of my arrival, resembles the Nicaragua you will encounter when you arrive next week; and yet I come to the realization again and again as students spend time learning here, that it is not only a place which changes us, nor a specific time in history that provides just the circumstances for a new process of thinking. Instead it is a disorientation from what we know.

As a young girl who’d been to school in New York I already knew about getting ahead, about comparing results and sorting people into winners and losers. I knew a lot about difference, how it feels and how it becomes glaring. Upon my arrival to Nicaragua at around the age of our youngest students, I had no other choice but to entirely renounce my place in such a pecking order. I knew nothing, I could do nothing but question. And there it began. There was a natural disorder, a certain amount of chaos, as there is in any busy workshop. But a deeper discipline was at work, the discipline of doing things and learning through life, an appreciation of knowledge as something that can be pooled, traded at little or no cost, and unlike commodities, when it is shared, no one has any less of it.

I can identify it now, that it was precisely in the midst of this informal unlearning, the unlearning of disconnectedness as a way of life, that my education happened. (Okay, well if I’m to be honest, it took more travel, Columbia University, and several degrees in Education and Development for me to be able to accept that that was when it actually happened. I’ve finally come to terms with the fact that one travels far to find what is near!)

Imagination, curiosity, and questioning would’ve been there for me all the time, anywhere, streets of New York or streets of Nicaragua; how we discover and dismantle the distorted masks we all look through is the question. Where do we begin to ask how we might engage and enlarge our lives. Where do we begin to get an education, of the kind that demands we confront ourselves, come to terms with our notions of the good life, try to comprehend, apprehend, or possibly even transform the places and the times which have shaped us.

This is what’s at the core of what I’ve wanted to share with students, be it here in Nicaragua or anywhere, it’s this, creating this hope: That we do not know what comes next. History is still in-the-making. Each of us a work-in-progress. The future entirely unknown and unknowable.

I’m so glad for the opportunity to talk with other educators. I thank you, because a step towards the unknown will be taken just by your coming here to the Land of Lakes and Volcanos. Nicaragua’s history of rebellion and continuing struggle against injustice instills both heartbreak and hope. I assure you, this is a country gets in you and stays with you, something irreversible…and holds an open invitation to not knowing what’s comes next.
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Nicaragua Educator

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Stories of the Unknown

Dhyana Kuhl,Nicaragua Educator

Description

Saludos and hellos to the group of you who, next Saturday, will join me and Luis here in Nicaragua. Ah, where to begin…perhaps I should begin by telling you of this country I call home, because it has been that to me for half my lifetime; but you will soon be met with the unbreakable […]

Posted On

07/28/14

Author

Dhyana Kuhl

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-28 09:03:33
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    [post_content] => Dear fellow educators,
By now you have looked over a sizeable amount of information in preparation for this course which we will begin to put to use, to practice, and into meaningful conversations starting less than a week from today. In the hopes that all of us can transition just as smoothly as possible, here’s just a few quick reminders to have on hand this week:
MEET UP REMINDER: 9:30 am on August 2nd, Hotel Lobby
Hotel Las Mercedes in Managua; 505 2255 9900; http://www.lasmercedes.com.ni/.
This is a very convenient hotel as it is directly across the road from the airport.
IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS:
Fairly straightforward, it’s a small airport. Immigration is first, you will need $10 cash for a Tourist Visa which will be stamped into your passport granting you 30-90 days in the country. You may be asked for an address you will be staying in Nicaragua. In this case use the address for the hotel: Las Mercedes, Carretera Panamericana, Managua
CONTACTING DHYANA AND LUIS IN NICARAGUA:
We are in country and will travel to Managua on the morning of the 2nd, but can be reached by phone on the 1st of August at the following numbers:
(505) 8841-1032 or (505) 8423-3095
PACKING:
Pack lightly and consider that it could be quite rainy, being the middle of the rainy season. Bathing suits, rain jacket, and bug spray will all come in handy.
SPENDING MONEY:
Please bring spending money for a night or two we may do dinners on our own, as well as for any other gift purchases, etc. you plan for.
A GREAT GIFT FOR HOME-STAY COMMUNITY
El Lagartillo, where we spend the majority of the program, is attempting to be a self-sustained community and is largely dependent on agriculture. They would greatly appreciate organic (ideally) food seeds as gifts, as they are yet to have a well-defined and managed seed-saving system.
PRE-TRIP READING AND VIDEO (Optional, during the course we will also provide excerpts from these as well as other texts)
- Have a look at Pico Iyer’s video on how we can define home in a globally dynamic world: http://blog.ted.com/2013/06/13/where-is-home-pico-iyer-at-tedglobal-2013/
- We Make the Road by Walking, is a wonderful book of conversations between Myles Horton and Paolo Freire in which they discuss Education and Social Change, much as we will!
- For some background on this country’s revolutionary history, a fairly quick and interesting read is Gioconda Belli’s The Country Under My Skin
- Or you could spend the plane ride getting excited about your upcoming travels in Nicaragua by reading Salmon Rushdie’s account of his own, in The Jaguar Smile
At the time this post appears to you, Luis is deeply immersed in the final days with a student group whose time in Nicaragua is now drawing to a close, while Dhyana is attempting to tie together all the loose strands of home life in order to join the upcoming course. As a matter of fact, this is precisely where you’ll most often find the two of us: reflecting and concluding another of life’s full chapters, or gearing up for the mysteries and surprises of the next! Or vice versa, or else just right in the where-we-are, because that’s where we want our students to find us, and where we ourselves most like to be.
We certainly experience first-hand just how hard it is to step away from work, family, and other pressing realities of our day-to-day lives; however, we want to take this opportunity to remind you that not only will it be challenging to find reliable internet and phone service at times, it also limits the learning we are each afforded if we are distracted by things back home.
Keep in mind that a good amount of energy gets exerted during these days leading up to travel as we all put things in order, make arrangements, wrap up details, transition, etc., but we think you’ll find it to be worth it when we can settle into a comfortable rhythm for a week of inspired learning here in Nicaragua.
Looking forward to seeing you all in Nicaragua.
Warmly,
Dhyana & Luis
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Nicaragua Educator

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Final Reminders

Dhyana & Luis,Nicaragua Educator

Description

Dear fellow educators, By now you have looked over a sizeable amount of information in preparation for this course which we will begin to put to use, to practice, and into meaningful conversations starting less than a week from today. In the hopes that all of us can transition just as smoothly as possible, here’s […]

Posted On

07/28/14

Author

Dhyana & Luis

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-26 21:06:24
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    [post_content] => Hi all!

I'm sorry that my introduction is coming along so late! I'm really excited about this trip and can't wait to meet everyone.

I'm also from Connecticut, and I graduated from college this May, where I studied Anthropology. In college, I participated in a service-learning trip to Uganda and led the trip the following year, working towards developing a long-term relationship between the group that we partnered with and a student group at my university.

Last summer, I was brought on board to a group working on a language-learning and leadership development program in West Africa called Mayi Mava; I spent two months in Ghana last summer working on the pilot year of the exchange program, and will spend the next year working on developing the program curriculum as well as developing a staff training program for the Ghanaian and Beninese staff that we hope to have join our team for next summer. This experience will be in many ways my point of departure for the year, and I'm really excited to learn from all of you, to collaborate and to share ideas as I begin this new phase of my life !

I love cooking (especially Italian food), reading and writing, art history, and hiking and the outdoors. I also especially love playing and being silly with my younger brothers who are 9 and 10! :)

I'm getting in the night of the 31st and will be around on the day of the 1st, though I'm not sure what I'll get up to yet. If anyone else is getting in early and would like to meet up and do some exploring or something, let me know!

Angelica

 
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Nicaragua Educator

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Introduction

Angelica Calabrese,Nicaragua Educator

Description

Hi all! I’m sorry that my introduction is coming along so late! I’m really excited about this trip and can’t wait to meet everyone. I’m also from Connecticut, and I graduated from college this May, where I studied Anthropology. In college, I participated in a service-learning trip to Uganda and led the trip the following […]

Posted On

07/26/14

Author

Angelica Calabrese

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-24 16:26:39
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-24 22:26:39
    [post_content] => Hello Educators,

Allow me to start by telling you what a pleasure it is to be introducing myself to you here on the Yak board and how excited and inspired I am for our upcoming journey together.

As I write this letter I am surrounded by the bustling sounds of San Marcos Carazo, a small city in southern Nicaragua where we will all find ourselves in a few weeks time.  I’ve just returned to the city with a group of ten young people after a two week homestay and language study experience in the rural town of El Lagartillo, another community you will come to know.  As we near the end of our time together my days are filled with thoughts of our transference process, how we will make the knowledge we’ve gathered relevant to our students’ lives at home.  I look forward to the next week of transforming their lived experiences into life long lessons.  I also look backwards, analyzing and reviewing the past four weeks this group has been together.  I think about the challenges they’ve faced and the successes they’ve won.  I feel satisfied when I think back onto the unformed gaggle of young people that arrived here weeks ago and I realize that they’ve changed.  This place, this time, these people and experiences have transformed them in obvious and subtle ways.  When I stop to think about this I get a rush in my chest, a feeling of deep gratitude and hope.  I’m addicted to this feeling.

My name is Luis Alvarado and my addiction to this transformative process began many years ago.  I grew up in a home where education was a priority.  My mother was the first person in her family to graduate from college, and she did so with style, finishing at the top of her class in academic excellence.  After finishing her doctorate she immediately made the transition to teaching and never looked back.  For as long as I can remember I have been instructed in the wonders of education.  She repeatedly told me that education was the greatest gift anyone could give or receive.

I attended university for studio arts and Spanish in rural northeast Missouri.  It was during this time that I began to travel, to step out of the traditional classroom and into the world of experience.  My travels took me to Latin America, I spent my summers in Guatemala working as an interpreter and guide for development projects in indigenous communities.  This is where I first felt the rush that I spoke about.  I could feel myself changing and growing and I could see it in others too.  I could see that the places we visit have tremendous power and that it would inevitably change those who took the time to know them.  After university I moved to Central America to continue to work in the development field.  I saw this pattern of transformation time and again.  I started learning to work with it.  I wondered if I could help channel this process and end up with specific results.  Get people to uncover things about themselves and their world through this exposure to something new.  I remembered the lesson that education is the greatest gift, and I wanted to enlist myself in helping others discover it.

This is where I met Dragons.  It was a really rewarding experience to enter into a community of people who also felt that education had so many places to go beyond the classroom, beyond ourselves.  The past three and half years have been an inspiring journey of discovery, an uncovering of possibilities.  I have worked a dozen Dragons’ courses in that time, summers, semesters and custom, and I have seen the power and the potential of these experiences.  I have faced many challenges and seen tremendous outcomes in my students.  I have learned more than I can tell you here about myself and my world.  I have felt that rush and satisfaction many times, and it never gets old.

It’s truly my pleasure to welcome you into this community of learners and teachers. As educators we hold a tremendous responsibility in our world.  I look forward to sharing my thoughts and experiences in this field with you and learning from yours.  I hope that in our time together we can reach some new places, challenge ourselves and leave the experience feeling more connected and inspired.  If there’s anything that I can do for you before you depart please don’t hesitate to write me at alvarado.dragons@gmail.com.

Hasta Pronto,

Luis
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Nicaragua Educator

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Introduction from Luis

Luis Alvarado,Nicaragua Educator

Description

Hello Educators, Allow me to start by telling you what a pleasure it is to be introducing myself to you here on the Yak board and how excited and inspired I am for our upcoming journey together. As I write this letter I am surrounded by the bustling sounds of San Marcos Carazo, a small […]

Posted On

07/24/14

Author

Luis Alvarado

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