Photo of the Week
Myanmar 4-week
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    [post_date] => 2014-07-28 22:26:20
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-29 04:26:20
    [post_content] => All students are safely on their flights back home or on to their next stop of their summer journey. We finished strong with 3 days in Yangon to reflect on our amazing journey and explore the rapidly changing and diverse city. We said goodbye first to Ko Kyaw, our in-country instructor, and then to Alex who by now has arrived in Korea. After a final night in Bangkok, we all piled into the airport shuttle and said our final farewells this morning. MC and Richard left first on to Brussels and Paris. Gavin and the rest of the students have just boarded their flight to Hong Kong where Kate will transfer on to Tokyo, and Jeremy on to Taiwan. Eliza, Kaiya, Erin, Jessica, Skyler, Maxine, Summer and Gavin will then fly to LAX where they should arrive around 2:55 pm. Many emotions were shared at the end but all students are excited to go home and share their transformative stories.

What an incredible journey! Safe travels to all!

Your thankful Myanmar Instructor Team

Jess, Jesse and Gavin
    [post_title] => On their flights!
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Myanmar 4-week

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On their flights!

I-Team,Myanmar 4-week

Description

All students are safely on their flights back home or on to their next stop of their summer journey. We finished strong with 3 days in Yangon to reflect on our amazing journey and explore the rapidly changing and diverse city. We said goodbye first to Ko Kyaw, our in-country instructor, and then to Alex […]

Posted On

07/28/14

Author

I-Team

Category

Myanmar 4-week

WP_Post Object
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    [post_date] => 2014-07-26 11:05:27
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-26 17:05:27
    [post_content] => As I write this yak, two students from the Thek Khar Institute are singing their hearts out as they preform a traditional Rhakine State song to a group of novice monks and orphans who live here at Golden Lion Monestary. If you told me a year ago that I would be witnessing this scene, I would have laughed in disbelief. Of the events that have occurred in the past month, from monsoon treks to yoga with Sin Le village girls and pagoda climbing at sunset, none of it feels real now that I look back. More like a magical dream or story someone else told me. And yet at the same time, my life in Myanmar feels more real and focused than anything else I have ever experienced. I am present and grounded here, feelings I often lack in my life at home. Here my thoughts when I wake up are not on next week's assignment or plans for the weekend but simply breakfast.
I will remember this country primarily by the people. There is an exuberant joy here, as expressed through their love of song and dance, and a quieter joy- show through the wide smiles I am greeted with by every passerby I make eye conact with on the streets. "Pe-yoh la?" (are you happy?), is a simple question often used as a greeting here. This is a culture that has undergone unspeakable sadness, terror, and violence. I am awed by their ability to always find lightness and beauty in their world.
There is also an inner strength or resilience within the citizens of Myanmar. I do not know if this strength comes from their deep belief in Buddhism. Or perhaps it is the result of years of government repression. Or maybe it is derived from someplace else. I think of my host mother, with her regal, lined face, whose day begins at 4:30 and ends past 10. Who squats over the small open fire to prepare meals for her family of 6. Or I think of my host sister, who, at age 15, works hunched over for hours, planting her families rice in knee deep mud. Or I think of the small monk I sat by on the truck today, who was forced to keep his legs folded under him and back squished against the wall for over an hour and yet didn't make a peep about any discomfort.
I am terrified I will lose the shifted perspective I have gained here in Myanmar. That I will return to my comfortable life in the US and forget a world where crosswalks, McDonald's, conditioner, and clean tap water does not exist. A world where monks line the streets at 5:30 AM, golden pagodas crowd the horizon, and a helping hand can always be found. A world where I have spent my past 30 days. Already I can feel my trip here slipping away from me, becoming a hazy memory. I know I will come back to this country. But it will be different, changed by the fingerprints of Western culture and corporations. I am so sad to see this adventure come to a close, but I will try to draw upon the Myanmar people's eternal optimism and focus instead on my good fortune of experiencing this country.

    [post_title] => 3 Million Cups of Tea
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Myanmar 4-week

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3 Million Cups of Tea

Eliza McCullough,Myanmar 4-week

Description

As I write this yak, two students from the Thek Khar Institute are singing their hearts out as they preform a traditional Rhakine State song to a group of novice monks and orphans who live here at Golden Lion Monestary. If you told me a year ago that I would be witnessing this scene, I […]

Posted On

07/26/14

Author

Eliza McCullough

Category

Myanmar 4-week

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-25 15:09:58
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-25 21:09:58
    [post_content] => Three days. 72 hours makes it sound a little longer. 4,320 minutes makes it sound a lot longer. But in reality they are all equal. It's like a trick question that my dad used to ask me. He would say, what weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of gold? The first time he asked me I almost immediately replied saying a pound of gold. But the answer is in the question -- they are both a pound. Three days. That is the time I have left before I leave Myanmar and begin my journey back home to New York City. Before eating rice at least three times a day is not a societal norm. Before walking down the street and having people actually smile at you. Before I return to my family, a mattress, AC and facebook. Three days before our group of sixteen will break up into sixteen smaller pieces that may never be put back together again. 72 hours, and I don't want to waste a single second of it. While I am living in the present and making the best of the little time I have left, I do feel the need to look back and reflect, but also to look ahead.

I cannot begin to fathom the fact that I am leaving this country. I don't think I ever even accepted the fact that I am here, in Myanmar, on the other side of the world, miles and miles away from everyone and everything I know. The fact that I left my own little world and everything I've ever known to come here. To forget about my world and learn about our world. I distinctly remember how I felt before leaving for this adventure -- I was scared, terrified in fact, hesitant, reluctant, and doubtful. Doubtful whether or not I could do it, mentally or physically. Doubtful whether or not a girl who has lived in New York City her whole life could survive with only two pairs of pants for an entire month. Doubtful if I could live without a phone or computer, without being in constant communication. Doubtful whether I could leave everything I've ever known and travel to a country that I barely knew anything about with people I had never met. But with a mere 72 hours left I can say that I haven't just survived but that I am more alive than I have ever been.

I can say confidently that this trip has been an unforgettable experience. It has changed me in ways that I am not sure I could put into words. I remember packing for the trip, sitting on the floor of my room with my mom and the packing list, making sure we had it all, that there were would be no last minute runs to get anything that we were missing. I remember how my mom asked me what books I was planning on bringing. I laughed at the thought of even packing a book -- it had been years since I ever actually read one that wasn't for a class. But with three days left and plenty of witnesses I can say that I have gone through everyone else's books on this trip and have no idea what I am going to do without something to read for the few days ahead. But that is just one tiny change. One tiny little insignificant change compared to the rest.

It feels like a lifetime has passed since I've been home in the chaotic and bustling city of New York. But on the contrary it feels like a day has passed since we arrived here in Myanmar. And if that were to be true -- that it has only been a day -- I would say that it has been the best day of my life. I don't think I could have gotten luckier with the group of people that I have spent the past month with. We have all grown to love one another and appreciate each other despite any differences in opinion or beliefs. I don't want to have to think about saying goodbye to any of them but more importantly, I don't want to have to think about saying goodbye to all of them as a group. One by one we will say goodbye to each other and we will all go back home whether home be the US, France, Belgium, China, Taiwan or Japan, and the chances of all of us seeing each other again as a group is slim to none. I truly believe that it doesn't matter where you are -- you could be anywhere in this world -- but it is about who you're with that will make something an incredible experience. People have the power to do that, to make something an unforgettable experience. An unbelievable experience. An experience that few in this world can speak about personally, an experience that only the sixteen of us will ever be able to understand.

It's more than the dragons group as well, it is the people of Myanmar that made this trip so special and unique. It is the Pre-College Program students from the Phaung Daw Oo Monastic School, the students from the Theik Khar Institute, the people from the village of Sin Le, and the students from the Golden Lion Monestary in Shwebo. These are the people who's faces have grown familiar. The people who's faces have become like family. Who's smiles and laughs have become contagious. Who's qualities of optimism, gratefulness, hospitality, curiosity and aptitude to learn have been contagious as well and become qualities of my own. Qualities that I hope to pass on to others when I return home, the way that the people of Myanmar passed them onto me.

I have spent all sixteen years of my life in New York, disregarding the family vacations and trips to summer camp each year. Sixteen years without too much change. If one does the simple arithmetic they will know that sixteen years is 192 months. Who knew that one month would have such a great impact out of those 192. That one month has not only changed me as a person but it will have an effect on my future and the person whom I aspire to be. One month that has provided me with more knowledge than I could ever imagine. Knowledge that cannot be taught out of a textbook. One month spent with fifteen others with whom I shared every minute and can relate to the experience with. One month of eating rice, of longyi showers, of playing charades because of the language barrier. One month of trekking through monsoons, of meeting new people, of hearing new stories, and so much more.

When I return home. I have begun to associate a lot of contradicting emotions with those four words. When I return home. I am excited. Excited to share my experience and stories with my friends and family. Excited to tell them all about watching sunsets from the ancient pagodas in Bagan. About the people of Sin Le and how they taught me how to plant rice and properly ride a water buffalo. About Inle Lake and how the people there paddle their boats with their feet and travel by canals and waterways instead of highways or streets. Or about the kids at the monastery in Shwebo, of whom many are suffering from HIV, but about how they will do anything for a laugh or a smile. About the little three year-old boy who can climb up a coconut tree like a koala, or the fountain I helped build, or the adobe mud house I helped create bricks for. But despite all of my excitement to share those stories, I can't help but feel saddened by having to say goodbye to the country where I experienced all of them. Where all of those memories were made. I am fearful of losing the new qualities I have obtained, fearful of reverting back to my old self. I am fearful of forgetting the people, the faces that have become so familiar, the children that I have learned so much from. I am fearful of forgetting the details, the small things that I wouldn't even think to think about on a day-to-day basis. But like everything else, fears must be overcomed. And maybe, if I am lucky enough, I will be able to come back someday.
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Best Notes From The Field, Myanmar 4-week

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Three Days

Maxine Stern,Best Notes From The Field, Myanmar 4-week

Description

Three days. 72 hours makes it sound a little longer. 4,320 minutes makes it sound a lot longer. But in reality they are all equal. It’s like a trick question that my dad used to ask me. He would say, what weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of gold? The first time […]

Posted On

07/25/14

Author

Maxine Stern

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-25 14:15:02
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    [post_content] => Dear Myanmar Students & Families,

 

This weekend marks the end of our Myanmar summer program and students will soon be boarding their planes and return home to share their tales of adventure with each of you.  We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival!

 

Below is a reminder of the return group flight information for your reference.  Starting on Saturday, 7/26, should you need any assistance during student travel days (outside of normal office hours), please call our Admin cell phone for assistance: 303-921-6078, or email: update@wheretherebedragons.com. During office hours (M-F, 9:00am-5:00pm M.S.T.) please continue to use our parent line at:800-982-9203 ext. 130.

 Returning Flight: 

July 28th, 2014 

Air Asia #254

Depart: Yangon (RGN) 5:50pm

Arrive: Bangkok (DMK) 7:35pm

July 29th, 2014 

Cathay Pacific #708

Depart: Bangkok (BKK) 9:20am

Arrive: Hong Kong (HKG) 1:15pm

July 29th, 2014 

Cathay Pacific #882

Depart: Hong Kong (HKG) 4:25pm

Arrive: Los Angeles (LAX) 2:35pm

  We wish all students a great trip home!   Sincerely, Boulder Admin   [post_title] => Myanmar (Burma) Return Flight Reminder [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => myanmar-burma-return-flight-reminder [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-07-25 14:15:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-07-25 20:15:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=106924 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 178 [name] => Myanmar 4-week [slug] => myanmar [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 178 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 254 [count] => 64 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 8.1 [cat_ID] => 178 [category_count] => 64 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Myanmar 4-week [category_nicename] => myanmar [category_parent] => 254 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2014/myanmar/ ) ) [category_links] => Myanmar 4-week )

Myanmar 4-week

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Myanmar (Burma) Return Flight Reminder

Eva Vanek,Myanmar 4-week

Description

Dear Myanmar Students & Families,   This weekend marks the end of our Myanmar summer program and students will soon be boarding their planes and return home to share their tales of adventure with each of you.  We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival!   Below is a reminder of the return group flight information […]

Posted On

07/25/14

Author

Eva Vanek

Category

Myanmar 4-week

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-21 22:07:15
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-22 04:07:15
    [post_content] => The Myanmar Team is now in Shwebo, our second to last stop on our
Myanmar itinerary. In a few days we'll be off to Yangon to begin
winding the course down - but for now, we're still immersed in our
service week. Excuse our silence lately - Shwebo is not the world's
internet mecca, it turns out!

We are partnering with two community organizations this week. While
doing service learning at Golden Lion Monastery here, we're working
alongside our peers from Theik Khar Myanmar,  a Yangon-based social
sciences school that focuses on building interfaith understanding
amongst its diverse student body. With our new friends from Theik Khar
we are volunteering at Golden Lion - teaching English, art and human
rights, helping with site maintenance and repairs, making adobe bricks
for an earthen outdoor classroom, and chipping in with the landscaping
by building a fish pond/fountain sculpture.

We're also getting to know the stories of the residents here - many of
them street children who are recovering from abusive family
backgrounds. Some have been child sex workers and some are living with
HIV/AIDS. In Myanmar, things often appear so peaceful on the surface,
but numerous monasteries like this one reveal the inevitable social
consequences brought about by decades of military rule, civil conflict
and unrest.

The life stories of the Theik Khar students also portray some of the
struggles that Myanmar people have been through. This week we'll be
learning more about the country's ethnic and religious groups, and the
challenges they face, in our friendship building with these students
who come from such groups as Kachin, Mon, Chin, Kayin, Rakhine and
Bamar, and represent Christianity, Islam and Buddhism. While these
students study side by side at Theik Khar, this is not to say that
it's easy to overcome the lifelong propaganda and divisiveness that
has put many of their groups at odds with each other throughout
history.

Indeed, we are encountering some stark realities this week and will be
careful to process and digest all we're taking in. We find it
meaningful that we are building new structures, places of beauty and
learning here - tangible symbols of life's inevitable resilience.

-Team Myanmar

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Myanmar 4-week

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Serving in Shwebo

Jessica Olney,Myanmar 4-week

Description

The Myanmar Team is now in Shwebo, our second to last stop on our Myanmar itinerary. In a few days we’ll be off to Yangon to begin winding the course down – but for now, we’re still immersed in our service week. Excuse our silence lately – Shwebo is not the world’s internet mecca, it […]

Posted On

07/21/14

Author

Jessica Olney

Category

Myanmar 4-week

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-21 16:33:54
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-21 22:33:54
    [post_content] => Dear Family and Friends of Myanmar Adventurers,

I hope this note finds you well.  I wanted to give you an update on the happenings in Myanmar.  The group is in Shwe Bo and they are going to be starting a service project tomorrow at the local monastery!  Things on the ground have been going well, but internet communication is intermittent and they have been unable to post yaks.

I talked to the team and everyone is doing well.  They have been having lessons on globalization, development, culture, history, working in their ISP's, and the students are currently leading the expedition phase of the course.  They get to work together as a team to run the days and lead the service project.  

I will be speaking with the team more in the next few days and hopefully the town can get some internet up and running for yaks.

Kind regards to you all,
Hillary

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Myanmar 4-week

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Bad Internet Connections, Beautiful Myanmar Experiences

Hillary Sites,Myanmar 4-week

Description

Dear Family and Friends of Myanmar Adventurers, I hope this note finds you well. I wanted to give you an update on the happenings in Myanmar. The group is in Shwe Bo and they are going to be starting a service project tomorrow at the local monastery! Things on the ground have been going well, […]

Posted On

07/21/14

Author

Hillary Sites

Category

Myanmar 4-week

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-15 17:43:16
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-15 23:43:16
    [post_content] => Just to fill in briefly what happened since our stay in Mandalay: we left Phuang Daw Oo a little over a week ago on a bus to Kalaw, a small town in Shan State. Over a dozen so-called Pre-College Program students, a group of PDO graduates heading soon to universities, joined us on our trip. At Kalaw, we did a scavenger hunt-esque activity with a Dragon partner and one or two PCP students in which we had to interact with locals and find out some interesting facts about the town. After, we began a five-hour trek from Kalaw to a village called Sin Lae.

And it was when I walked into Sin Lae, exhausted by having to hike up and down mountains with a overly stuffed backpack, when I came across four children - three boys and one girl - no older than eight years old each. They stood side-by-side just staring at me. At the time, we were on a "solo walk," where the instructors staggered the group so that each of us could walk more or less alone (just some sixty yards away from the person in front or behind), so I was, at least for the time being, alone with the four blank faces.

Maybe it was because seeing people after a couple hours alone was a sight for sore eyes or simply because I just wanted to break the ice, I pulled out my camera and gestured to them, silently asking them if they'd be okay if I took a photo of them. At first, they gazed curiously at my camera. Clearly, they've never seen a Nikon D90 before. Not knowing what else to do, I pointed the lens at the them and prepared to snap a photo.

Then, the four children looked at each other. One of them, a boy who appeared to be the oldest, smiled and screamed "Oppan Gangnam Style!" Simultaneously, the four children mounted their invisible horses and trotted like Psy himself. Needless to say, of the 1373 photos I've taken so far, the one I took of them dancing is, by far, my favorite.

But besides the photo, I received something else from that experience. I received acceptance. The people at Sin Lae were some of the warmest, kindest people I've ever met. I learned that despite our differences, there were some things, such as a viral YouTube video, that could really unite people from across the globe. And, though I didn't know I was in it at the time, Sin Lae would be where I would stay for four days with a host family. During my stay at the village, I met those four kids many times. And every time we ran into each other, we - kids and teen, natives and foreigner alike - would gallop by each other on our invisible horses.
    [post_title] => Gangnam Styling in Sin Lae
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Myanmar 4-week

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Gangnam Styling in Sin Lae

Alexander Kim,Myanmar 4-week

Description

Just to fill in briefly what happened since our stay in Mandalay: we left Phuang Daw Oo a little over a week ago on a bus to Kalaw, a small town in Shan State. Over a dozen so-called Pre-College Program students, a group of PDO graduates heading soon to universities, joined us on our trip. […]

Posted On

07/15/14

Author

Alexander Kim

Category

Myanmar 4-week

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    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2014-07-15 17:41:53
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    [post_content] => July 13th 2014:

I woke up that morning in a rural monastery which we had hiked 13 miles to arrive at.  As tired and beat as we all were, we hadn't reached our destination yet.  That morning we set off on a 1o mile hike with our group and the PCP students as well.  It was a grueling trek, with hardships and heartbreaks (not really) along the way.  At about 2pm we had finally finished our trek and lunch.  We arrived at the local boat taxi service which we promptly hopped in, so that we could enjoy a beautiful 2 hour long boat ride across Inle Lake.  Upon arrival our instructors prompted us to lead our own path to the hotel where we'd be staying the night, so using the locals guidance we eventually found our way to our temporary home.  After we had each taken a hot shower and taken care of our laundry, we decided that the only true way to celebrate a birthday in Myanmar would be to go to the local pizza place.  Now in normal standards this was very mediocre pizza, but for a group of 12 teenagers who had been living off of rice for every meal for the past two weeks, this pizza was the best thing that had ever happened to us. Or at least me.  I assumed that was the end of the night but when we got back to the hotel much to my surprise I discovered that the counselors had gotten the hotel staff to rig up a karaoke machine complete with all the best musicians of our time, Shakira, Taylor Swift, and our lord and savior Lady Gaga.  It was heaven.  We danced and sang and the PCP students arrived shortly after and they danced and sang to all of their favorite Burmese tunes.  Then a cake was brought out.  Now  in normal standards this was a very mediocre cake, but for a group of 12 teenagers who had been living off of rice fro every meal for the past two weeks, this cake was the best thing that had ever happened to us.  Or at least me.

After the cake was eaten away, and the festivities died down, we all went back to sleep for a few hours, so that we could wake up and watch the world cup match.  Of course when 12 teenagers are being woken up at 1:30 am there is very little enthusiasm for anything, so in actuality it was just myself, my room mate Richard, and our instructor Jesse who attended a showing of the match.

It was the most memorable birthday I've ever had and the amount of adventure I had in one day was unparalleled.

-Skyler Joy
    [post_title] => My Birthday in Burma
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Myanmar 4-week

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My Birthday in Burma

Skyler Joy ,Myanmar 4-week

Description

July 13th 2014: I woke up that morning in a rural monastery which we had hiked 13 miles to arrive at.  As tired and beat as we all were, we hadn’t reached our destination yet.  That morning we set off on a 1o mile hike with our group and the PCP students as well.  It […]

Posted On

07/15/14

Author

Skyler Joy

Category

Myanmar 4-week

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    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2014-07-15 08:40:48
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-15 14:40:48
    [post_content] => On the last day of my home stay, my host sister offered to take my PCP partner, Mon Thu, and I up to the spring source of the villages water supply. The three of us walked up and overgrown path for about 15 mintutes. We finally reached the water source, a tiny spring shaded by a large Banyan tree. Mon Thu explained to me that the small structure under the tree was a shrine to the spirit who the people believed blessed the village with water. As we continued to hike up the mountain, Mon Thu described to me the differences between spirits and Buddha and the basic beliefs of Buddhism. Mon Thu was once a nun and hopes to become one again in her life, if her family is ever able to support themselves without her income. She told me about her average day in the monastery in which she would eat only two meals and meditate for about ten hours. She said she misses the peace she found in her life as a nun and struggles to find space for meditation in her current life as a teacher.

The profound impact Buddhism has upon the Burmese culture was evident in Sin Le, the village where we did our home stay. I slept under  a Buddhist shrine, watched my host sister change the water for the shrine and pray before it daily, attended a Full Moon festival celebration at the monastery, and listened to my host sisters repeat a Buddhist prayer for a full hour. Buddhism seems to touch every aspect of life in Sin Le, a fact the amazes me because religion plays such  small role in my own life. The culture here makes constant space for spirituality, unlike American culture. Although Mon Thu told me Buddhism is becoming less of a focus in the large cities, I still feel the presence of faith in every place I visit here in Myanmar.
    [post_title] => Spirit Shrines and Dragon Fruit
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Myanmar 4-week

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Spirit Shrines and Dragon Fruit

Eliza Mcullough,Myanmar 4-week

Description

On the last day of my home stay, my host sister offered to take my PCP partner, Mon Thu, and I up to the spring source of the villages water supply. The three of us walked up and overgrown path for about 15 mintutes. We finally reached the water source, a tiny spring shaded by […]

Posted On

07/15/14

Author

Eliza Mcullough

Category

Myanmar 4-week

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    [post_date] => 2014-07-15 08:37:52
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    [post_content] => There is a Buddhist belief that we cross paths with people in this life because we met in our past lives. After our homestays in Sinle village, I actually believe this. Naturally, at first I was very nervous about the homestay, as it was my first time living with a family that I had never met, in a country that I had only spent a short week in, that spoke a completely different language, and lived a life with different customs and habits that I was still a stranger to. It was a relief to have a native speaking homestay partner from the Pre-college program at PDO to share the experience with, but at the same time I didn't want them to play the role of a translator.

Though it took a couple of days to get used to, but gradually as I became part of the community I began to feel as if the village was somewhat of a second home. The culture of the community is something that I learned a lot from. The way that neighbors would stop by in the afternoons for some tea and snacks almost daily, unannounced; how my homestay sister who was just 4 years old would pull as much weight around the house doing chores as my 17 year old homestay sister who planted rice out on the fields; anywhere I went, houses, the local shop, the monastery with the eccentric monk, I was greeted with warm smiles, tea, a friendly hello and lots and lots of  "Burmese chocolate" or palm sugar candy. It is this sort of community culture that I would like to bring back home. The friendliness and openness to new people, the idea of putting others before yourself and the notion of helping others without the expectation of getting something in return. It is easy to forget these things living our fast paced and busy lives, but these are things that I will bring back home with me to share with my friends and family, as well as even strangers.

At the end of my homestay, my homestay mother offered to adopt me and I respectfully declined, but how close I had gotten with my family despite the cultural differences and language barrier really made me believe that I may have actually known this family in my past life. There was some sort of familiarity, not a mere superficial connection, but a deeper one, a human connection. So when the time came to leave Sinle village, I knew that I would be seeing this  family again.

    [post_title] => See you later gator
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Myanmar 4-week

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See you later gator

Kate Latimore,Myanmar 4-week

Description

There is a Buddhist belief that we cross paths with people in this life because we met in our past lives. After our homestays in Sinle village, I actually believe this. Naturally, at first I was very nervous about the homestay, as it was my first time living with a family that I had never […]

Posted On

07/15/14

Author

Kate Latimore

Category

Myanmar 4-week

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