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Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012


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I doubt anyone's gonna really see this but whatever, we shall yak.

YEEEYAAA!!

I miss you people!!

The first two days back I was pretty much continuously looking at the pictures from the trip.

And by now they all look so unreal and distant.

But still, thank you everyone for the birthday I had at Madaba.

The midnight party was the sweetest thing and the two cakes were wayyy beyond Jordanian quality.

I LOVE YOU<3

Love,

Leo

[post_title] => dreamy reality [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => dreamy-reality [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-08-19 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=40206 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 295 [name] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 [slug] => jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 295 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 252 [count] => 38 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 15.1 [cat_ID] => 295 [category_count] => 38 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 [category_nicename] => jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012 [category_parent] => 252 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2012/jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012/ ) ) [category_links] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 )

Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

View post

dreamy reality

Leo Lou,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

I doubt anyone’s gonna really see this but whatever, we shall yak. YEEEYAAA!! I miss you people!! The first two days back I was pretty much continuously looking at the pictures from the trip. And by now they all look so unreal and distant. But still, thank you everyone for the birthday I had at […]

Posted On

08/19/12

Author

Leo Lou

WP_Post Object
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    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2012-08-15 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => Throughout our stay in Jordan, I have come to discover that the ideal  Muslim approaches one's duty within one's gender role and one's  relationships with the highest possible degree of emotional  intelligence. This emotional intelligence is derived from conducting  oneself appropriately in all social interactions. The ideal Muslim is  supposed to hold the following values: "patience, both fear and love of  Allah, holding one's tongue, humility, purification of the heart,  honesty, and truthfulness. The key characteristic is truth. Islam is  based on truthfulness, truthfulness leads to goodness, and goodness  leads to paradise. My independent study project (ISP) seeks to examine  how Jordanian Muslims approach their relationships and roles within  their society.


First, the ideal Muslim must show good treatment, compassion, politeness, and deep gratitude to one's parents; and especially to one's mother. Islam acknowledges that children are born to be closer to their mothers; and as a result, women have the great burden and responsibility of raising their children, through Isalmic practice, to become phenomenal members of society. The Qur'an says: "O you who believe! Save yourselves and your families from a Fire whose Fuel is men and stones..." (Qur'an 66.6). With greatest sincerity, the ideal Muslim must remember to thank one's parents and especially one's mother for her plight to make them who they are today. I first came into contact with this sense of gratitude and compassion in Wadi Rum when Omar, our guide, spoke of his father and mother. He spoke of taking care of them, but also reminded those present to be grateful for all they do. In another episode in Disi, I gathered with my host brother and host mom, Brendan, and his host brother and host mom. I was amazed by the fact that the two sons curled up in their mother's arms and spoke so kindly to them. ALthough they respected their fathers, I sensed that they also feared them, whereas this interaction was pure sincerity, gratitude and compassion - clearly exemplifying the bond between mother and child.


Second, the ideal Muslim must remember one's duties to their relatives and not forget the high status given to relatives in Islam. Islam and the Hadiths clearly instruct that an ideal Muslim should keep in touch with their relatives no matter the circumstance. I found this to be the case numerous places in Jordan. There is no doubt that the family bond is strong and extremely important to many people with the society. One example of this is Martin's Disi family. He described to us how the elder members of the family, who lived elsewhere, would come to visit and supervise the family. In addition, he once remarked how they also accepted and welcomed the more societal misfit family members into their homes and over for dinner. The ideal Muslim makes sure that his/her entire family has a place to call home.


Third, the ideal Muslim must remember that "brotherly love," their relationship with friends and brothers, has historically been considered to be the best and purest of relationships by the Qur'an and the Sunnah. I have witnessed this strong sense of brotherly love more than once. I feel as though it is known as the best and purest relationship as one often feels closest to their sibling or friends above all others. The first time I witnessed this was between my two host brothers in the nomadic home-stay. Although both young boys, they clearly depended on one another in a shared plight: navigating the lack of a father figure as well as extreme boredom in this desolate desert. They were inseparable, but what else would you do in the desert without a playmate, a brother, or a friend? The first time I experienced this "brotherly love" for myself was in my Disi home-stay while I was sick. My host brother stayed with me the entirety of the time that I was sick and constantly asked how I felt. A dark gloom came over his face each time I expressed how I was truly feeling. On the third night of my illness, my host brother asked me if I wanted to go to the desert camp with him. I still felt terrible, but I knew I would feel guilty if I did not match his compassion. He had been so patiently waiting to see his friends while I had been sick, and so I agreed to go. The next morning I was cured of my sickness... There is clearly something beautiful about brotherly love.

Fourth, the ideal Muslim parent must recognize and understand their responsibility to raise their children with love and compassion by influencing their Islamic development. I read an Islamic proverb online that was along the lines of: teach your child Islamic practice by 7, and beat them if they do not understand it by the time they are 10. In the West, we may shudder to hear this encouragement to beat one's child to keep them in line. At the same time, I think back to when Emma told us about how her host mother once hit her child, and how the child was upset, but ran around the kitchen table and straight back into her arms. To me, this episode lines up with what I have found through my experience in Japan. In America when teenagers rebel, they turn towards independence and away from their parents, whereas rebellion in Japan may come out in the form of total dependency on their parents. Muslim parents raise their children to use compassion to become independent members of society.

Fifth, the ideal Muslim husband must learn to understand the psychology of his wife and her needs in order to effectively support her. I feel disprivelaged that during my five week stay in Jordan, I was unable to encounter examples of this - mainly due to the gender divide. That said, I witnessed husbands such as my nomadic home-stay grandfather, who did not seem to care at all about his wife, to my Disi father who loved his wife to my Rajef father who seldomly talked to his wife. In the end, this one will be a mystery to me.

Finally, the ideal Muslim must uphold one's responsibilities as a good neighbor by supporting them without expecting compensation as well as turning a blind eye to their faults. I did not notice this in the neighborhood way, but rather amongst store owners in Aqaba. I found myself bearing witness to shop owners helping on another with their shops, advertising, or simply sharing a cup of tea together.

From my ISP, I have learnt that Islam places a lot of responsibility in each individual to create a functioning and flourishing society around them. I think that his personal responsibility to be respectful, gentle, hospitable, and friendly has been seen throughout our stay here. Time and time again, I have been surprised by the kindness and generosity of the people here whether it be from an offering of tea or to the man who drove us 100 km out of his way to Dana. I have found that the root of this friendly culture can be found in Islam.


Hopefully you can get it posted this time! This is my ISP based on how I perceived the answer to the question.


Enjoy,


Justin [post_title] => How does the Ideal Muslim act in Jordanian society? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-does-the-ideal-muslim-act-in-jordanian-society [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-08-15 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=40226 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 295 [name] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 [slug] => jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 295 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 252 [count] => 38 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 15.1 [cat_ID] => 295 [category_count] => 38 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 [category_nicename] => jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012 [category_parent] => 252 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2012/jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012/ ) ) [category_links] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 )

Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

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How does the Ideal Muslim act in Jordanian society?

Justin Vogel,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

Throughout our stay in Jordan, I have come to discover that the ideal Muslim approaches one’s duty within one’s gender role and one’s relationships with the highest possible degree of emotional intelligence. This emotional intelligence is derived from conducting oneself appropriately in all social interactions. The ideal Muslim is supposed to hold the following values: […]

Posted On

08/15/12

Author

Justin Vogel

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    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2012-08-14 00:00:00
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    [post_content] =>         

Throughout our stay in Jordan, I have come to discover that the ideal Muslim approaches one's duty within one's gender role and one's relationships with the highest possible degree of emotional intelligence. This emotional intelligence is derived from conducting oneself appropriately in all social interactions. The ideal Muslim is supposed to hold the following values: "patience, both fear and love of Allah, holding one's tongue, humility, purification of the heart, honesty, and truthfulness. The key characteristic is truth. Islam is based on truthfulness, truthfulness leads to goodness, and goodness leads to paradise. My independent study project (ISP) seeks to examine how Jordanian Muslims approach their relationships and roles within their society.

First, the ideal Muslim must show good treatment, compassion, politeness, and deep gratitude to one's parents; and especially to one's mother. Islam acknowledges that children are born to be closer to their mothers; and as a result, women have the great burden and responsibility of raising their children, through Isalmic practice, to become phenomenal members of society. The Qur'an says: "O you who believe! Save yourselves and your families from a Fire whose Fuel is men and stones..." (Qur'an 66.6). With greatest sincerity, the ideal Muslim must remember to thank one's parents and especially one's mother for her plight to make them who they are today. I first came into contact with this sense of gratitude and compassion in Wadi Rum when Omar, our guide, spoke of his father and mother. He spoke of taking care of them, but also reminded those present to be grateful for all they do. In another episode in Disi, I gathered with my host brother and host mom, Brendan, and his host brother and host mom. I was amazed by the fact that the two sons curled up in their mother's arms and spoke so kindly to them. ALthough they respected their fathers, I sensed that they also feared them, whereas this interaction was pure sincerity, gratitude and compassion - clearly exemplifying the bond between mother and child.

Second, the ideal Muslim must remember one's duties to their relatives and not forget the high status given to relatives in Islam. Islam and the Hadiths clearly instruct thatan ideal Muslim should keep in touch with their relatives no matter the circumstance. I found this to be the case numerous places in Jordan. There is no doubt that the family bond is strong and extremely important to many people with the society. One example of this is Martin's Disi family. He described to us how the elder members of the family, who lived elsewhere, would come to visit and supervise the family. In addition, he once remarked how they also accepted and welcomed the more societal misfit family members into their homes and over for dinner. The ideal Muslim makes sure that his/her entire family has a place to call home.

Third, the ideal Muslim must remember that "brotherly love," their relationship with friends and brothers, has historically been considered to be the best and purest of relationships by the Qur'an and the Sunnah. I have witnessed this strong sense of brotherly love more than once. I feel as though it is known as the best and purest relationship as one often feels closest to their sibling or friends above all others. The first time I witnessed this was between my two host brothers in the nomadic home-stay. Although both young boys, they clearlydepended on one another in a shared plight: navigating the lack of a father figure as well as extreme boredom in this desolate desert. They were inseparable, but what else would you do in the desert without a playmate, a brother, or a friend? The first time I experienced this "brotherly love" for myself was in my Disi home-stay while I was sick. My host brother stayed with me the entirety of the time that I was sick and constantly asked how I felt. A dark gloom came over his face each time I expressed how I was truly feeling. On the third night of my illness, my host brother asked me if I wanted to go to the desert camp with him. I still felt terrible, but I knew I would feel guilty if I did not match his compassion. He had been so patiently waiting to see his friends while I had been sick, and so I agreed to go. The next morning I was cured of my sickness... There is clearly something beautiful about brotherly love.

Fourth, the ideal Muslim parent must recognize and understand their responsibility to raise their children with love and compassion by influencing their Islamic development. I read an Islamic proverb online that was along the lines of: teach your child Islamic practice by 7, and beat them if they do not understand it by the time they are 10.In the West, we may shudder to hear this encouragement to beat one's child to keep them in line. At the same time, I think back to when Emma told us about how her host mother once hit her child, and how the child was upset, but ran around the kitchen table and straight back into her arms. To me, this episode lines up with what I have found through my experience in Japan. In America when teenagers rebel, they turn towards independence and away from their parents, whereas rebellion in Japan may come out in the form of total dependency on their parents. Muslim parents raise their children to use compassion to become independent members of society.

Fifth, the ideal Muslim husband must learn to understand the psychology of his wife and her needs in order to effectively support her. I feel disprivelaged that during my five week stay in Jordan, I was unable to encounter examples of this - mainly due to the gender divide.That said, I witnessed husbands such as my nomadic home-stay grandfather, who did not seem to care at all about his wife, to my Disi father who loved his wife to my Rajef father who seldomly talked to his wife. In the end, this one will be a mystery to me.

Finally, the ideal Muslim must uphold one's responsibilities asa good neighbor by supporting them without expecting compensation as well as turning a blind eye to their faults. I did not notice this in the neighborhood way, but rather amongst store owners in Aqaba. I found myself bearing witness to shop owners helping on another with their shops, advertising, or simply sharing a cup of tea together.

From my ISP, I have learnt that Islam places a lot of responsibility in each individual to create a functioning and flourishing society around them. I think that his personal responsibility to be respectful, gentle, hospitable, and friendly has been seen throughout our stay here.Time and time again, I have been surprised by the kindness and generosity of the people here whether it be from an offering of tea or to the man who drove us 100 km out of his way to Dana. I have found that the root of this friendly culture can be found in Islam.

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Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

View post

How Does the Ideal Muslim Act in Jordanian Society?

Justin Vogel,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

Throughout our stay in Jordan, I have come to discover that the ideal Muslim approaches one’s duty within one’s gender role and one’s relationships with the highest possible degree of emotional intelligence. This emotional intelligence is derived from conducting oneself appropriately in all social interactions. The ideal Muslim is supposed to hold the following values: […]

Posted On

08/14/12

Author

Justin Vogel

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    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2012-08-10 00:00:00
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Throughout our stay in Jordan, I have come to discover that the ideal Muslim approaches one's duty within one's gender role and one's relationships with the highest possible degree of emotional intelligence. This emotional intelligence is derived from conducting oneself appropriately in all social interactions. The ideal Muslim is supposed to hold the following values: "patience, both fear and love of Allah, holding one's tongue, humility, purification of the heart, honesty, and truthfulness. The key characteristic is truth. Islam is based on truthfulness, truthfulness leads to goodness, and goodness leads to paradise. My independent study project (ISP) seeks to examine how Jordanian Muslims approach their relationships and roles within their society.

First, the ideal Muslim must show good treatment, compassion, politeness, and deep gratitude to one's parents; and especially to one's mother. Islam acknowledges that children are born to be closer to their mothers; and as a result, women have the great burden and responsibility of raising their children, through Isalmic practice, to become phenomenal members of society. The Qur'an says: "O you who believe! Save yourselves and your families from a Fire whose Fuel is men and stones..." (Qur'an 66.6). With greatest sincerity, the ideal Muslim must remember to thank one's parents and especially one's mother for her plight to make them who they are today. I first came into contact with this sense of gratitude and compassion in Wadi Rum when Omar, our guide, spoke of his father and mother. He spoke of taking care of them, but also reminded those present to be grateful for all they do. In another episode in Disi, I gathered with my host brother and host mom, Brendan, and his host brother and host mom. I was amazed by the fact that the two sons curled up in their mother's arms and spoke so kindly to them. ALthough they respected their fathers, I sensed that they also feared them, whereas this interaction was pure sincerity, gratitude and compassion - clearly exemplifying the bond between mother and child.

Second, the ideal Muslim must remember one's duties to their relatives and not forget the high status given to relatives in Islam. Islam and the Hadiths clearly instruct thatan ideal Muslim should keep in touch with their relatives no matter the circumstance. I found this to be the case numerous places in Jordan. There is no doubt that the family bond is strong and extremely important to many people with the society. One example of this is Martin's Disi family. He described to us how the elder members of the family, who lived elsewhere, would come to visit and supervise the family. In addition, he once remarked how they also accepted and welcomed the more societal misfit family members into their homes and over for dinner. The ideal Muslim makes sure that his/her entire family has a place to call home.

Third, the ideal Muslim must remember that "brotherly love," their relationship with friends and brothers, has historically been considered to be the best and purest of relationships by the Qur'an and the Sunnah. I have witnessed this strong sense of brotherly love more than once. I feel as though it is known as the best and purest relationship as one often feels closest to their sibling or friends above all others. The first time I witnessed this was between my two host brothers in the nomadic home-stay. Although both young boys, they clearlydepended on one another in a shared plight: navigating the lack of a father figure as well as extreme boredom in this desolate desert. They were inseparable, but what else would you do in the desert without a playmate, a brother, or a friend? The first time I experienced this "brotherly love" for myself was in my Disi home-stay while I was sick. My host brother stayed with me the entirety of the time that I was sick and constantly asked how I felt. A dark gloom came over his face each time I expressed how I was truly feeling. On the third night of my illness, my host brother asked me if I wanted to go to the desert camp with him. I still felt terrible, but I knew I would feel guilty if I did not match his compassion. He had been so patiently waiting to see his friends while I had been sick, and so I agreed to go. The next morning I was cured of my sickness... There is clearly something beautiful about brotherly love.

Fourth, the ideal Muslim parent must recognize and understand their responsibility to raise their children with love and compassion by influencing their Islamic development. I read an Islamic proverb online that was along the lines of: teach your child Islamic practice by 7, and beat them if they do not understand it by the time they are 10.In the West, we may shudder to hear this encouragement to beat one's child to keep them in line. At the same time, I think back to when Emma told us about how her host mother once hit her child, and how the child was upset, but ran around the kitchen table and straight back into her arms. To me, this episode lines up with what I have found through my experience in Japan. In America when teenagers rebel, they turn towards independence and away from their parents, whereas rebellion in Japan may come out in the form of total dependency on their parents. Muslim parents raise their children to use compassion to become independent members of society.

Fifth, the ideal Muslim husband must learn to understand the psychology of his wife and her needs in order to effectively support her. I feel disprivelaged that during my five week stay in Jordan, I was unable to encounter examples of this - mainly due to the gender divide.That said, I witnessed husbands such as my nomadic home-stay grandfather, who did not seem to care at all about his wife, to my Disi father who loved his wife to my Rajef father who seldomly talked to his wife. In the end, this one will be a mystery to me.

Finally, the ideal Muslim must uphold one's responsibilities asa good neighbor by supporting them without expecting compensation as well as turning a blind eye to their faults. I did not notice this in the neighborhood way, but rather amongst store owners in Aqaba. I found myself bearing witness to shop owners helping on another with their shops, advertising, or simply sharing a cup of tea together.

From my ISP, I have learnt that Islam places a lot of responsibility in each individual to create a functioning and flourishing society around them. I think that his personal responsibility to be respectful, gentle, hospitable, and friendly has been seen throughout our stay here.Time and time again, I have been surprised by the kindness and generosity of the people here whether it be from an offering of tea or to the man who drove us 100 km out of his way to Dana. I have found that the root of this friendly culture can be found in Islam.

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Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

View post

How Does the “Ideal” Muslim Act in Jordanian Society?

Justin Vogel,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

Throughout our stay in Jordan, I have come to discover that the ideal Muslim approaches one’s duty within one’s gender role and one’s relationships with the highest possible degree of emotional intelligence. This emotional intelligence is derived from conducting oneself appropriately in all social interactions. The ideal Muslim is supposed to hold the following values: […]

Posted On

08/10/12

Author

Justin Vogel

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    [post_content] => We've arrived safely at JFK. It's so sad to say goodbye to our tribe, but we can't wait to reunite with all of you! See you soon! Sarah
    [post_title] => Home again, home again jiggety jig
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Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

View post

Home again, home again jiggety jig

Sarah Hay,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

We’ve arrived safely at JFK. It’s so sad to say goodbye to our tribe, but we can’t wait to reunite with all of you! See you soon! Sarah

Posted On

08/8/12

Author

Sarah Hay

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    [post_date] => 2012-08-06 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => By this time tomorrow, the 2012 Dragons of Jordan will be on a plane heading to JFK airport. The flight will be a long one but the company will be good. The hardest part for me about getting on that plane tomorrow will be trying to convince myself that I am simply moving on to my next destination and not actually just heading back home. "Going back" to the states implies returning to an identical climate to the one I left six weeks ago. I know things at home have continued at a normal pace but my life in Jordan has no such norms or consistancies. I know that I have not become a different person here, but I know that it pains me to think of returning home and going back to my normal routine. Somehow I can't fight the feeling that going home will consist of "unlearning" many of the things I have picked up while traveling. I will have to get used to missing softwafts of nargile smoke circling lazily around the inside of restaurants. And of course I will need to remember to ask for, "the receipt, please..." instead of simply saying, "mumpkin fatoorah?" There will be no more shookrans or exclamations of "YALLAH!" I will not have to cover my hebrew tattoo up when I walk into conservative areas. No more Lebnah and Zata breakfasts for me. No Dana sunsets.These senses and observations I will lose. My habits will likely shift back to my dear Chicago standards. But as I begin to collect my thoughts and belongings for the flight home, I am clinging to the hope that the things I've seen here and the people I've spent time with will continue to influence me for quite some time. That is why I am trying to think of leaving less as going back home and more as a journey onward. I encourage all other Dragons, in my tribe in Jordan and on future trips, to do the same.
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Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

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Dragons in Jordan

Emma Lister,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

By this time tomorrow, the 2012 Dragons of Jordan will be on a plane heading to JFK airport. The flight will be a long one but the company will be good. The hardest part for me about getting on that plane tomorrow will be trying to convince myself that I am simply moving on to […]

Posted On

08/6/12

Author

Emma Lister

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I know the trip's over but I just remembered to write a yak! Overall, this has been a great experience. I really enjoyed emmersing myself in the culture through various activities such as home stays and travel. Highlights of the trip include my home stay in Disi with the Bedouin family, trekking in Wadi Rum and our expedition phase in Israel/Palestine.

In Disi village, I stayed with a Bedouin family in their home. My host father, Abdul Kareem, was a great guy. He spoke good English and was extremely hospitable and generous. I had a great insight into the life style and culture of the Bedouins.

In the beginning of the trip, after 3 days in Aqaba, we went to Wadi Rum for our 3 day trek. We had a Bedouin guide and slept under the stars for 3 nights. Trekking was a very new experience for me, and as a result I got tired very easily. However, Omar, our Bedouin guide, was very encouraging and kept pushing me to keep walking to our destination. We also summitted the highest mountain in Jordan by Saudi Arabia, which obviously I would have passed out on if not for Omar's encouragement. This particular activity not only made me physically stronger, but also increased my inner strength and determination.

Our expidition phase was also a lot of fun. We did a home stay in Beid Jala, a Christian village outside Bethlehem. Once again, my host brother and host father were great. My host brother's uncle even gave me a haircut in his studio at home with a discount! I especially enjoyed the religious sites in Jerusalem and Bethlehem as well as learning more about the continuous conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians.

Overall, I had a great trip. I'd reccomend this program to any one who wants a new, exciting, unique one in a life time experience.

Masalaam

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Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

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Quick reflection on trip

Nikhil Bhambri ,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

I know the trip’s over but I just remembered to write a yak! Overall, this has been a great experience. I really enjoyed emmersing myself in the culture through various activities such as home stays and travel. Highlights of the trip include my home stay in Disi with the Bedouin family, trekking in Wadi Rum […]

Posted On

08/6/12

Author

Nikhil Bhambri

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    [post_date] => 2012-08-06 00:00:00
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Hi,

We've completed our expedition phase already. It's all gone so fast. Our time in Israel and Palestine was incredible. We had the opportunity to pass daily through some of the world's most hotly contested territory and we all learned so much. Six weeks is almost done and we are all experiencing the mixed feelings of excitement for home and sadness about leaving.

Goodbye

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Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

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Bye Jordan

Brendan Powell,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

Hi, We’ve completed our expedition phase already. It’s all gone so fast. Our time in Israel and Palestine was incredible. We had the opportunity to pass daily through some of the world’s most hotly contested territory and we all learned so much. Six weeks is almost done and we are all experiencing the mixed feelings […]

Posted On

08/6/12

Author

Brendan Powell

WP_Post Object
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    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2012-07-26 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

Dear Yak Yak,

Well then. We haven't talked for a few weeks, but I guess we've both been busy. It's ok, people drift. Anyways, I found this entry in my journal from a few days ago. Thought I might write it down:

Amman is such a loud city. Now that the sun is still bright and belligerently present, but mellowing, I can actually open my eyes. That's not me being metaphorical: in the heat of the day, I feel blind because I have to squint against the sun and everything feels angrily hot. The honking of the cars as people stretch towards iftar in an hour and a half feels like a personal insult. There is some delicious smell (fried? meat?) which is tempting me outside, almost strong enough to quell the nervousness I feel in every new city. And Amman is definitely a city. I want to wander at dusk, alone, even though that is basically haram or at least not a very good idea.

Even now, sitting on the window ledge, the men below oblivious that Im stealing whiffs of whatever ridiculously delicious food they are cooking next to stacks of pirated DVDs, I have my head covered. Does it make me feels safe? A little. It's comforting, some sort of polyester protection. There is an unexpected element of vanity involved with covering women: we assume we are valuable, that any and all men want us. That we are irresistable. It not only assumes that women are naturally lascivious or at least impossibly tempting and therefore must be hidden so that men dont go wild with desire and become hopelessly distracted and crash their cars and let the whole Islamic Empire go to waste, it also degrades men by assuming they are disrespectful and lack all self-control. Of course, this is only one part of it. It would take me at least a few more pages to describe the deep respect and piety and love involved with covering women. After all, why do I continue to do it?

I'm not really hungry from fasting, actually it's my head giving me the most trouble. I feel scarily and also sort of pleasantly light-headed. I just hope I dont fall out the window. I think the other kids think I'm hopelessly serious and dull, but Im really just grumpy and hungry!!!

One last thing. I used to find the houses here sort of plain and dismal, but I've come to like the style of "nuclear bunker chic". And it turns out the houses here are MEANT to look unfinished! For tax purposes! Isnt that wild? That explains all the exposed metal rods.

Love, Livvy

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Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

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First Day in Amman

Olivia Markbreiter,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

Dear Yak Yak, Well then. We haven’t talked for a few weeks, but I guess we’ve both been busy. It’s ok, people drift. Anyways, I found this entry in my journal from a few days ago. Thought I might write it down: Amman is such a loud city. Now that the sun is still bright […]

Posted On

07/26/12

Author

Olivia Markbreiter

WP_Post Object
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    [ID] => 40460
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2012-07-24 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

since my last post i have trekked through wadi rum, lived with a bedouin family in the desert for two nights, lived with another family in diseh (disa?) for six days, lived with another another family in a mountain town (represent) called rajef, lodged in hotel dana for three days and got sick as a traveler for a good 36 hours whilst i stayed in the beautiful town, and finally arrived in amman yesterday.

my most fond memories of trekking and of my homestays are without a doubt the moments of personal, raw, and unbridled cultural experience. writing this yak is difficult because there is so much Amman going on outside of this internet cafe. Reflection is for a post travel experience!

i'm excited to tell my loved ones of my travels when i return to the states

until then- stay classy

forrey

[post_title] => quick yak [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => quick-yak [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-07-24 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=40460 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 295 [name] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 [slug] => jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 295 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 252 [count] => 38 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 15.1 [cat_ID] => 295 [category_count] => 38 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 [category_nicename] => jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012 [category_parent] => 252 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2012/jordan-crossroads-of-tradition-and-modernity-summer-2012/ ) ) [category_links] => Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012 )

Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

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quick yak

forrest stone,Jordan: Crossroads of Tradition and Modernity, Summer 2012

Description

since my last post i have trekked through wadi rum, lived with a bedouin family in the desert for two nights, lived with another family in diseh (disa?) for six days, lived with another another family in a mountain town (represent) called rajef, lodged in hotel dana for three days and got sick as a […]

Posted On

07/24/12

Author

forrest stone

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