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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012


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To start things off, I’m just going to plainly state that I’ve found it difficult to dive back into my real life and deal with 1st world problems. Who are these AP teachers to think that 100 question summer assignments are the most efficient way to spend my days of freedom? I realize that some teenagers require the work to insure that they don’t slack off for the entire break, but there is a plethora of things that one cannot learn from answering questions posed on typed document. Its ridiculous that so many years of schooling can’t teach me in the same magnitude that a 6-week course in foreign country can.

Of course, I am probably just ranting out of frustration. I’ve maintained quite a busy schedule since returning home. Unpacking my bags, embracing my relatives, explaining the trip countless times, adapting to reverse culture shock, finishing summer assignments, emailing my college counselor, my youth group director, and my boss, catching up with my friends, starting school, and struggling to retain the glow of a world traveler, has left me with little free time. I haven’t found the hours to complete a Yak- until now. I had this enlightenment in country, but only in this instant has it gone public.

This course has come full-circle in so many ways. The Dragons instructors and staff have really just thought of every minute complication that ensues with returning home. I’d like to thank you all for that. In the few days right after returning, realizations hit me one after the other like waves upon a pebbled shore. It seems to me that many students have a new definition of where “home” really is- in the line waiting to board an airplane, in the country where he or she spent over a month of summer, or simply within the confines of his or her heart. In my own opinion, home will always be windy Lucas Valley, a sheltered hideaway nestled between rolling hills of gold 35 minutes north of San Francisco in the beautiful Marin County. No matter how hard I try, this will not change. I have to realize that I always have to return home after an enervating journey.

In the beginning of my journey through Cambodia an instructor conveyed to us a segment of a commencement speech by David Foster Wallace. “There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, ‘Morning, boys, how's the water?’ And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, ‘What the hell is water?’” We changed greatly over the 42 days in country, as I am sure most Dragons alumni have come to grasp. We all comprehend these transformations at different times. It really hit me on August 5th, 4.5 kilometers south off the coast of Kep, on a small island by the name of Koh Tunsay. The water is a calming commodity, the beach a peaceful strip of white sand, and the lush jungle a picturesque backdrop to a tranquil paradise. It seemed to be idyllic for reflection; a flawless locale for transference.

Our stay on Koh Tunsay spanned from the late afternoon of the 2nd to the morning of the 5th. From the beginning, it had been our plan to watch the sunrise. Our first attempt was thwarted by fierce congregation of clouds that muffled the entire sky with its pretentious presence. The second time had every student sleeping through it- each, I’m assuming, seeing the sun upon awakening was hit with the same sorrowful realization of missed opportunity. So it was with great resolve on the third morning that we finally had the chance to stare in wonder at the eastern horizon’s transition into daylight.

To complicate our situation further, our accommodations were constructed on the western shore. This ensued an early morning sleepy stumble through the inky black swathes of jungle. We woke early, with the sun still asleep beyond the horizon. Our dragons group conglomerated from our separate bungalows in the pre-dawn gloom. My flip-flops splattered cool brown mud onto the backs of my legs as we began the trek inland. Armed with a handful of headlamps, our team skirted around the island’s northern edge. I myself however carried nothing with me- no camera, no wallet, no journal, no watch. I left all these behind to ensure a sense of presence. I found it is easier to live in the moment and be completely interconnected with the world around you when all these distractions are left behind. You have no burden to bear nor obligation to fulfill. You have your mind and your spirit and that is enough.

Back on the beach, the world glowed a muted silver, but surrounded by the reaching branches of forest, it was impossible to see 10 feet in front of you without the aid of a light. Once or twice we emerged from the clutches of the dense vegetation to clamber over the rocky shoreline. Once or twice we a hit dead-end and had to backtrack to recover the trail. Once or twice I questioned my motives for waking up so early. After around 40 minutes we reached our destination. Of course 40 minutes is only a rough estimate; at the time it could have been 15 minutes or even one hour. I had no watch and therefore time mattered very little to me. As long as our group reached the east coast before sunrise, time seemed petty and inconsequential. I suppose you could say it really just ceased to exist.

A curved sandbar extends from Koh Tonsay like an outstretched hand pointing toward Vietnam. Our group sat at the very tip, feet inches away from the water. The sky overhead was beginning to change its hue- we made it just in time. The sandbar lined up perfectly with the rays of orange light beginning to pierce the darkness. Behind our backs, the moon still shown brilliantly as if not wanting to be outdone by her polar opposite. In a way, her quiet perseverance in a fading indigo sky was just as humbling to behold as the rising sun. It was the sort of subtle beauty that is often overlooked. There is always more too see than what is directly in front of you. If one were to assume that the previously stated opinion is commonly overlooked (which it is), it can be inferred that if new discoveries are made by looking the opposite direction than the general public. When the majority looks straight ahead, take the time to swivel your head sideways and backwards to gain a new angle and a new insight. If a horde of whiney tourists mill around the top level of Bayon like American cattle, it’s my advice to take to the stairs and explore the temple’s cavernous underbelly. When every inch of the monument is marked by etchings, why would anyone want to join the cows?

The entire sweeping sky was a hemisphere spectrum of orange, gold, white, navy-blue, and cobalt. The sun itself had not quite reached the horizon, but the potent display of warm colors foretold of its coming. It was at this point that I stepped out into the water. I was not the first, nor the last. None of that mattered. I removed my sandals and placed one foot after the other into Gulf of Thailand.

The soft silt squished between my toes with a gentle grace. It was pleasantly cool. The water washed up around my ankles. The land slowly descended beneath me, lowering me imperceptibly deeper. One foot after the other… Twenty-five feet off the coast and the surface of the sea only swirled around my knees. After around 75 it hit my waist and at 200 it was at my chest. One foot after the other… The gulf seemed to stretch out infinitely, its dark azure waters rippling silently in all directions. Directly ahead of me, a sliver of sun sliced the sky above the black silhouette of far away island. Gradually the world grew brighter. Behind me rested Koh Tonsay, proudly beckoning me further. I felt I knew the island quite well for having only spent three days with it. The morning light illuminated its lush sloping mountainsides, its arching stripes of beach, and its sparkling waves.

The tips of my fingers brushed the surface of the undulating water. It was astoundingly quiet. This far from the coast, the sea had nothing to come into contact with. It simply ebbed and flowed. You are free from all distractions; your entire life in America, all material possessions, and every single one of your past trepidations. You have gone miles, mentally, physically, and emotionally to get to this point. Not a sound was made and I stood witness to this peaceful silence with open ears and an open heart. It is at this point, when nothing can be heard, that you must listen the hardest. The only thing left to do now is focus.

Then it hits you.

The island behind you is your safe house. It is your comfort zone and it is your halcyon refuge. It is a conglomeration of your past experiences. The islands ahead of you represent the endless possibilities of your future. Each is a silhouette, a shadowy isle of unknown. All are miles away, yet all are within your power to reach. The sun is the prospect of a brighter tomorrow. You walk in the path reflected by the light of the sun on the water’s surface. The water itself is your life calmly dancing all around you. It is all that is and all that will be. It is constantly augmenting towards your horizons.

Now recall Wallace’s proverb- the young fish that don’t realize they are swimming in water.At some point this changes.In essence, you come realize your own existence.

This epiphany, when it strikes, opens your eyes.You are finally awake. You are finally alive.

And you are changed forever.

We are wiser than we know.”

-Ralph Waldo Emerson

“A single event can awaken within us a stranger totally unknown to us. To live is to be slowly born.”

-Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

End Note-

Unfortunately, for reasons beyond their control, not every student was able to physically make it to the sunrise. Of course, as I explained, it doesn’t matter. Mentally and emotionally, we all reached the same symbolic precipice… and proceeded to jump off into the sea. We have found the authority to venture forward, to press on to new terrain. We can pursue our own endeavors and we can hunt down our own ambitions. We have the power to choose and no one can ever take that away.

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Best Notes From The Field, Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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Awakening

Jack Betz,Best Notes From The Field, Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

To start things off, I’m just going to plainly state that I’ve found it difficult to dive back into my real life and deal with 1st world problems. Who are these AP teachers to think that 100 question summer assignments are the most efficient way to spend my days of freedom? I realize that some […]

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The process of coming home so far has felt a little bit like landing a plane. You'd think that something flying through the air at such a speed wouldn't rattle around and shake like airplanes often do when passing through turbulent air--something that's so aerodynamic, if you'd never been in a plane before, you would guess would cut through the air and glide toward the earth and the wheels would gracefully slide out and slip onto the ground. But that's not quite how it happens--the plane hits the ground and immediately struggles to slow down, the plates on the wings pulling up, resisting the wind, and all the passengers rocking around in their seats until the plane slows down to a reasonable speed.

On my way home, I had a fair amount of time--and plane landings (five, to be exact)--to contemplate what life would be like at home, post Cambodia. So I think coming home is like landing a plane in the sense that it would seem, hypothetically, like a smooth journey--going from one wonderful experience back home to feel a different kind of luxury again: hot showers, soft beds, food and Internet access whenever you want it... but instead it's not quite like that. It's a difficult, sometimes painful experience to relinquish one life for another that seems newly foreign, unfriendly, and unpleasant. Of course, there was a hot shower and a soft bed waiting for me, like I knew there would be, but I was just coming home from a place where I questioned whether I really needed things like that in my life. And I was coming home to a place where everyone behaves as though, obviously we need them, life would be somehow worse otherwise. It makes me want to ask everyone here, would you really never be able to be happy if you ate the same thing for every meal and had cold showers? Why haven't you thought about it this way like I have? I have never become angry or impatient because of these thoughts, but sometimes it’s so hard to think the way that I did in Cambodia, not just about showers and beds, but about life.

I'm coming back to a place where all the thoughts I've had about myself and my own life have not yet changed my environment. I was given the opportunity to go someplace where I began to build a new way of thinking, then transported back to a life that didn't seem compatible with what I'd spent 6 weeks constructing--a way of thinking that I was very, very happy with.If I had such a personal transformation while still at home, I think my life here would have changed with it; gradually, as I would grow less satisfied with certain habits and more inspired by others, I would form my life around my new beliefs and come out on the other side with a daily life and environment that matched my thoughts. This is not to say, of course, that I wish I could have stayed home this summer--not that at all. But now I’m in a situation where I spent this time of my life in Cambodia building myself as a person and growing new branches and finding and creating new thoughts and theories about myself, my life, and the world, in a place that inspired me and was so new from the beginning. I am now back in a place that my new way of thinking has never seen before... it’s like taking a fish out of water. Can my new beliefs and things that I’ve learned survive outside of Cambodia, in a place where I’ve lived my entire life believing other things?

Forgive me for my rather disconnected Yak; I suppose I’ve dropped the plane analogy by now and just gone on a rant of questions. I’m still trying to gather my thoughts about how this process is going to work, how I’m going to work through this. And perhaps I never will gather them all together in a neat bundle. But hopefully my fish can learn to breathe air and flourish outside of the fish bowl, too. Hopefully, after a few weeks, or maybe a few months, it won’t feel like a struggle at all, but a happy and successful coexistance, or mixture, of two lives that I’ve lived. :)

Miss you guys. :)

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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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Landing

Catherine Von Holt,Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

The process of coming home so far has felt a little bit like landing a plane. You’d think that something flying through the air at such a speed wouldn’t rattle around and shake like airplanes often do when passing through turbulent air–something that’s so aerodynamic, if you’d never been in a plane before, you would […]

Posted On

08/14/12

Author

Catherine Von Holt

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This Yak is dedicated to my instructor Caleb Brooks.

99% ofitwas born from his teachings. Thanks

for a great summer.

A kind of paradise. Everything itself.

The sea is water. Stones are made of rock.

The sun goes up and goes down. A success

without any enhancement whatsoever.

-Jack Gilbert

Traveler’s diarrhea and culture shock left me feeling weak, both physically and emotionally, when I arrived in Nantucket, Massachusetts to meet my family.After 55 hours I had traveled from Phnom Penh, a city of cramped market stalls and bustling, motorbike packed streets, to Nantucket, an island that serves as the vacation destination of Wall Street mavens and trust-fund babies alike (fortunately my family is neither of those things). When I was not in the bathroom, I was busy comprehending where I was, how I’d gotten here, and what the hell I had done for the last six weeks. This mental task was probably more stressful than the physical task I was dealing with in the bathroom. I apologize for the detail, as Dragons knows, I’ve spent the last forty mornings talking about my personal waste.

Nonetheless, I understood quickly that I was experiencing culture shock in a unique place. I was not home, yet I was at a very familiar place: a house I have visited each summer of my life. Like all of us, I am struggling with departing Cambodia. With absolute certainty I can say that my summer in Cambodia this year has been the most important time of my life so far. Reflecting on the trip fondly and accepting that it is over, are very difficult things to do at the same time. Reconciling those two thoughts is what makes re-entry such an emotionally strenuous time.

To put it bluntly, the life I lived in Cambodia made me happy. The people, my instructors, and my friends made me happy. And I have been told for many years that the purpose of life is simply to be happy. So the idea that the trip had ended made very little sense to me when I landed in Nantucket.

After trying to explain small details about the trip to my parents, I gave up and slept for ten hours. I woke up slightly depressed, ate some dinner and watched the Olympics in silence. Somehow in a country where there is so much to watch on TV, it feels at times that there is so little to actually fulfill oneself with. Cambodia, I thought to myself, that is a country where I always felt fulfilled, where I felt busy, where I felt like I had meaning, and where I felt apart of this world.

At around 5 AM the next day, I was pleasantly reminded that those feelings are not exclusive to Cambodia.

I slipped on some sandals and a sweater. Delirious and shivering, I walked out of our house into a dark sky, lit by a half moon and a bright batch of stars. I walked through a curving path, through 70 feet of moors and down a steep flight of aluminum steps. The Atlantic Ocean confronted me like an old, disgruntled friend who felt neglected. “Interesting,” I thought to myself, “moonlight glistens on the Atlantic Ocean just like it does on the South China Sea.”

I began what I knew would be a long walk eastward, down the beach. Until that morning I had felt empty. I could not find cities filled with bustling motorbikes in Nantucket. I could not find tuk tuk drivers willing to drive me across the island. I could not find Cambodia in Nantucket. That much was clear as soon as I landed in a world of designer labels and mansions. But I could find a certain unenhanced beauty on Nantucket. The same natural beauty that made me fall in love with Cambodia.

Often in my country we ignore what truly makes up our world. Instead we focus on what human beings have filled it with. Nantucket has sprawling, oversized homes and Koh Tonsay has huts. Of course, people have made Nantucket and Koh Tonsay into two drastically different places. But no matter how much we change, the sea is still made of saltwater on the Atlantic, just as it is on the South China Sea. There are footprints in the sands of Koh Tonsay just as there are on Nantucket. Waves crash on the shore and wash those same footprints away on Nantucket, just as they do on Koh Tonsay. The beaches are empty at 5:50 AM on Koh Tonsay. And they are on Nantucket as well. “Just the way I like it,” I thought to myself as the sky began to light up, “sunrise with just myself and the sea.”

Believe it or not, the sun comes up and down every day in the United States of America, just as it does in Cambodia. I may struggle in the next few months to handle certain elements of the American lifestyle, but I know I will always find solace in nature. We can put as many million dollar compounds on the shores of Nantucket, but that will never change how that glowing, orange ball rises above the horizon every morning and lights our world. That sun has risen over the horizon every day for billions of years. As our instructor Caleb would point out, the sunrise cannot be enhanced.

The United States is as much a part of the miracle that we call Earth, as Cambodia is. When I remind myself of that concept, it is easy to see my country as just another kind of paradise.

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Best Notes From The Field, Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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Another Kind of Paradise

Andrew Wofford,Best Notes From The Field, Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

This Yak is dedicated to my instructor Caleb Brooks. 99% ofitwas born from his teachings. Thanks for a great summer. A kind of paradise. Everything itself. The sea is water. Stones are made of rock. The sun goes up and goes down. A success without any enhancement whatsoever. -Jack Gilbert Traveler’s diarrhea and culture shock […]

Posted On

08/13/12

Author

Andrew Wofford

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Dear Mara,

We would like to thank you and the communities of PrekPdao and Piem villages for the kindness, hospitality, and care you have provided to our children over the last six weeks. We are greatful for the opportunity you provided to them.We know that you all built ties that will last life long. What a treasure this is!

Dalya Guris and Guillermo Herrera

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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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Thanks to the Communities

Dalya Guris,Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

Dear Mara, We would like to thank you and the communities of PrekPdao and Piem villages for the kindness, hospitality, and care you have provided to our children over the last six weeks. We are greatful for the opportunity you provided to them.We know that you all built ties that will last life long. What […]

Posted On

08/8/12

Author

Dalya Guris

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Journey home
by MARA PHO

instructor
August 08, 2011


Updates from Cambodia!

The Cambodia summer 2012 team just left Cambodia earlier this afternoon accompanied by one instructor, Caleb Brooks, except for our fellow Swiss friend, Lillo who flew off on his own a bit later after the whole group and also Jake who will take off from the group at Bangkok.

In the past few days, there has been a mixture of sadness and excitement about leaving each other and heading home. It is never easy to say goodbye to our beloved friends whom we have bonded so well and we have gone through a lot together in the past six weeks. We studied about service learning, development, local cultures, religions, history, and more. We visited NGOs. We stayed in local communities. We went trekking. We slept in the hammocks in the wood. We went really rugged and local--eating rice almost every meal just like locals do. We rode in the back of the pick-up trucks, squeezing in the mini vans and staying in a local Wat etc.As this trip ended, we realized that we have accomplished so much thus far. I hope that everyone continues this journey further down the road. I am looking forward to staying in touch with you all.

I miss you already guys.

Have a safe and enjoyable flight!

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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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The group is on their way home

Mara Pho,Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

Journey home by MARA PHO instructor August 08, 2011 Updates from Cambodia! The Cambodia summer 2012 team just left Cambodia earlier this afternoon accompanied by one instructor, Caleb Brooks, except for our fellow Swiss friend, Lillo who flew off on his own a bit later after the whole group and also Jake who will take […]

Posted On

08/7/12

Author

Mara Pho

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Freedom means something different to everyone. To a woman trafficked into prostitution in Cambodia, freedom can mean returning home safely to her family. To a teenager living in Wisconsin, freedom can mean driving 80 miles per hour down the highway.

I've always had my different opinion on freedom, but I had never truly felt it. Yesterday, which leaving Rabbit Island on a boat heading towards the mainland, I felt what it meant to be absolutely free. My eyes went out into the ocean, watching clean blue waves spill over each other like children falling at a playground. I heard the sound of the boat's motor, muffling everyone conversations and the waves crashing against the sides of the boat. I felt the salted sea wash my face as I was flying over the water. My hair was blowing in the wind and knotting up, not in the least bit attractive.

A rush of emotion engulfed my body as I closed my eyes and took notice of everything. Freedom is a state of mind. I am free. I am leaving a chapter of my life tucked away at a beautiful island and heading off to my next adventure. All my responsibilities vanished in that moment. Everyone I had ever met in my life disappeared. It was just me and the ocean.

Freedom comes from within. A man can take everything away from you, but he can never take away your mind.

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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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What Is Freedom

Andrea Herrera,Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

Freedom means something different to everyone. To a woman trafficked into prostitution in Cambodia, freedom can mean returning home safely to her family. To a teenager living in Wisconsin, freedom can mean driving 80 miles per hour down the highway. I’ve always had my different opinion on freedom, but I had never truly felt it. […]

Posted On

08/5/12

Author

Andrea Herrera

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I have spent all of the past year only partly invested in the present. At school I intently observe the digital seconds running away on my watch, and by half way through class only concentrate on the remaining countdown to my next lesson. I usually pack my things up well before the bell rings. I spend first bell wishing it was second, second wishing it was third, third to fourth...and before I know it the day is over. I look forward to tests as it means getting them over with, I count on the weekend for a break, but then wish away Sunday as I finish my homework and prepare for school on Monday morning. Before I knew it, the week was over, the month was over, and 9th grade had ended. In wishing away all the times I was looking forward to, I missed all the moments that make us nostalgic about the past. The time we are given isn’t meant to be wished away.

This summer, my goal was to stay present…to appreciate everything in every moment. I have watched the ants parade in a funny squiggle across the wall, across the floor, and under the mats. I have rid myself of agendas and taken time to listen to fourteen other people’s lives, wanting to hear every detail, and remember every emotion surrounding their memories. I have enjoyed catching the odd whiff of Cambodian air, a scent that I cannot exactly place, but smells something of drying fish, motor exhaust, and incense. I’ve caught sight of colorful spirit houses hidden at the base of telephone poles or decked on a tree among smoggy gray streets. I’ve walked over red-dirt floors packed tight like brown sugar. I’ve grinned at the electrical wire strung between the trees, cleverly disguised as a branch. I’ve enjoyed the small things that I didn’t plan. In Cambodia I’ve learned that life is impermanent and subconsciously we feel obligated to mark this life with big events, big moments, and big successes. Spending time anticipating the big, meant I missed the unplanned, beautifully natural moments that pass by every day. Being observant is different from being present, but finding joy and humor in a pseudo-branch makes taking the time to slow down and observe life, in itself - presence.

In Cambodia, I take the seat facing backwards during all tuk-tuk rides. I engage with the people I’m surrounded by and discuss local and global issues. If not, I look beside me and enjoy the combination of people, things, and animals precariously perched on motorbikes. I’m not focusing on what’s ahead, but what is now, what is beside me. Life is short and moves fast, to be present doesn’t just mean counting the big things we think we’ll remember. Instead, it means enjoying the sound of the ocean, breathing in and out with the tide… being startled when the kitten named cookie dough jumps up on your lap looking for rice...and spending time questioning how trees have grown into the ancient Angkorian temples.

The idea of always knowing what’s coming up has been hard for me. When I know I naturally organize my time into neatly formed, regulated boxes, but then my time becomes a job to manage away. This summer, I’ve slowed down because if I hadn’t, I would have spent my time facing forward in the tuk-tuk.

Going home I realize I'll need to know some of what is ahead. In two weeks I'll go back to school, schedules, and plans. My summer in Cambodia can't last forever, but I will carry home the ability to enjoy what I didn't plan. I will remain present, observing every second of my day. I will enjoy exchanges in school hallways, discover ants that crawl on neat sidewalks, and continue inquiring my surroundings.

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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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Facing Backwards

Grace Cawdrey,Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

I have spent all of the past year only partly invested in the present. At school I intently observe the digital seconds running away on my watch, and by half way through class only concentrate on the remaining countdown to my next lesson. I usually pack my things up well before the bell rings. I […]

Posted On

08/5/12

Author

Grace Cawdrey

WP_Post Object
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    [post_date] => 2012-08-05 00:00:00
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As our group was driven from Kep back to Phnom Penh, I felt as though I was slowly leaving something behind. Like a flower whose petals were being picked off and tossed to the wind, or a dandelion whose white seeds were being blown off by the gusts that blew around everyone’s hair in the van as we hurtled down the narrow paved road. It wasn’t even until halfway through the drive that I realized this would be the last time to watch the Cambodian countryside, which I have grown so accustomed to, passing by.

This morning I watched the sun rise over a calm ocean. As my friends and I walked along the mud bank on the east side of Koh Tonsei, the water along the shore sounded something like a mix between a small, flowing creek, the rustle of bright green leaves, and steady rain. The quiet crunch of our feet on the sand and shell fragments accompanied that sound. So early in the morning, you’d think such an environment would send a reluctant teenager right back to sleep, but this morning, I felt more awake, alive, and refreshed than I think I have ever been.

In these six weeks, we have shared a lot of amazing moments—and in these last few days, our instructors have challenged us to prepare these memories in a way that they’ll be able to work as a positive… momentum, almost, in our lives. We have made pledges to ourselves—we will become more informed global citizens, more selfless people… productive, helpful, patient, inspired, motivated forces in the world.

I know that, with these experiences with me now, I’ll definitely try; I feel prepared to strive for that goal.

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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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Goodbye to rice paddies

Catherine Von Holt,Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

As our group was driven from Kep back to Phnom Penh, I felt as though I was slowly leaving something behind. Like a flower whose petals were being picked off and tossed to the wind, or a dandelion whose white seeds were being blown off by the gusts that blew around everyone’s hair in the […]

Posted On

08/5/12

Author

Catherine Von Holt

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    [post_date] => 2012-08-03 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

Dear Guatemala Families,

Next week marks the end of our Guatemala program and students will soon return home to share their tales with each of you.

One of our Guatemalainstructors will fly back home with the group and will ensure that all students find their domestic connections. Our Dragons field-staff will be in contact with us if they suspect any delays.

We wish all students a great trip home. Please leave us a voice message on extension 30 if you are not able to reach us during office hours. We will be checking our messages throughout the evening.

Sincerely,

BoulderAdmin

To check on the status of the group’s international flight, please refer to:

http://www.aa.com/travelInformation/gatesTimesAccess.do

Returning Flight:

August 8th, 2012

American Airlines #AA 928

Depart: Guatemala City (GUA) 6:50am

Arrive: Miami (MIA) 11:35am

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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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Return flight information

Dragons Administration,Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

Dear Guatemala Families, Next week marks the end of our Guatemala program and students will soon return home to share their tales with each of you. One of our Guatemalainstructors will fly back home with the group and will ensure that all students find their domestic connections. Our Dragons field-staff will be in contact with […]

Posted On

08/3/12

Author

Dragons Administration

WP_Post Object
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    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2012-08-01 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

We just want to let people back home know that the group is heading to an island on the coast in the southwest part of Cambodia. We are spending our next three days there mainly for students’ presentation of their independent study projects and lessons. We will not be able to access the internet. So please don’t expect to hear from us. We will have the group to write home or post their yaks when they get to Phnom Penh on the 5th. Many thanks for your supports and your care.

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Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

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Heading off to the rabbit island

Instructor Team,Cambodia: Studies in Development and Peace, Summer 2012

Description

We just want to let people back home know that the group is heading to an island on the coast in the southwest part of Cambodia. We are spending our next three days there mainly for students’ presentation of their independent study projects and lessons. We will not be able to access the internet. So […]

Posted On

08/1/12

Author

Instructor Team

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