Photo of the Week
Photo Title

« Back to Yak Board Archive Site

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011


WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43215
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-08-02 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-08-02 06:00:00
    [post_content] => 
After a 3-day homestay in a small Tibetan village near Xunhua, a 5-day trek through the beautiful Tibetan plateau, then another 2-day stay in the Tangka painter's home in Rebkong, we finally returned to Xining, where we can finally shower! This was the longest we've gone on this trip without Internet access, modern toilets or showers. But we are all in Xining now, everyone is safe, healthy, and in good spirits.

We also heard of theunfortunateevents that have taken place in Kashgar in the last few days, even though we are far from Xingjiang now, we are still sadden by the news. Our whole group had a moment of silence last night, for the people in Xingjiang. Our thoughts are with them.

On a brighter note, we are leaving for Beijing tomorrow! The capital of China is only a 24-hour train ride away. We are all very excited to visit this ancient city.

The Silk Road I-team
[post_title] => Back in Xining [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => back-in-xining [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-08-02 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2011-08-02 06:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43215 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

Back in Xining

Silk Road I-team,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

After a 3-day homestay in a small Tibetan village near Xunhua, a 5-day trek through the beautiful Tibetan plateau, then another 2-day stay in the Tangka painter’s home in Rebkong, we finally returned to Xining, where we can finally shower! This was the longest we’ve gone on this trip without Internet access, modern toilets or […]

Posted On

08/2/11

Author

Silk Road I-team

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43217
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-08-01 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => Home stays were the one thing I really didn't want to do on this trip. Sure I could see the value of going on one, but for me they were really intimidating. Now? It wouldn't be a breeze, but definitely easier. I stayed with a family in a small village on the edge of the Tibetan Plateau. It was a large house, square foot wise. And had a courtyard in the center, with a garden. Our family consisted on a grandmother, a father, a mother and two girls. They were very hospitable and spoke no english. The father spoke very little of manderin, so Jade could kind of get by. But we mostly used hand gestures and failed miserably. No one could understand our Tibetan, except for hello and thank you. We had a ball. On our third day we went out to the fields and helped till the soil. Our guide kicked our butts. We were so slow. Our spade was made out of wood and looked like an over grown crow cay mallets. I was the only one without bisters. After our stint in the field the other girls crashed over lunch and I read for a while. After a two hour power nap they went off in search of the general store for ice tea and pepsi. I stay behind and loved myself for it. The father and older girl brought out albums for me to look at. And they also brought diplomas. But because they were all in Chinese I had no idea what they were for. But clearly someone had gone to college. I then started to look at a lot a various pictures, mostly featuring a young man, mid twenties. I at first thought it was the father when he was younger. Then the girl returned and Jade asked about the diplomas. It turns out that the young man is the oldest son of the family. He went to med-school on a scholarship and was sending back money regularly to the family. I then started to take a closer look at the house and suddenly could see some of the money. It wasn't obvious, or anything, but the quality of the china and the flat screen suddenly made sense. It was a familyThe next day we said good bye, but still. I don't think I'll ever forget Jane teaching the baby to take a picture or the grandmother and me arguing over who got to wash the dishes. 
    [post_title] => Home Is Where The Plateau Is
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => home-is-where-the-plateau-is
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2011-08-01 00:00:00
    [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43217
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 324
                    [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011
                    [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 324
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 251
                    [count] => 70
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 18.1
                    [cat_ID] => 324
                    [category_count] => 70
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011
                    [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011
                    [category_parent] => 251
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011
)

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

Home Is Where The Plateau Is

Sarah Schacht,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

Home stays were the one thing I really didn’t want to do on this trip. Sure I could see the value of going on one, but for me they were really intimidating. Now? It wouldn’t be a breeze, but definitely easier. I stayed with a family in a small village on the edge of the […]

Posted On

08/1/11

Author

Sarah Schacht

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43256
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-30 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

We've emerged from the rugged backcountry made up of rolling hills, river-cut vallies, fog covered grasslands, inset monasteries and villages. Tonight our group is resting in Rebkong - a city infamous for its Tibetan arts. Tonight blisters can finally take a break away from boots, while the rest of our bodies rest after our first warm shower in the last week.

The students have many stories to tell, but in short, the instructor team wanted to share with the Dragons' community that everyone is well, safe, healthy, fed, and non-smelly anymore. These few pictures don't begin to capture the beauty nor smiles that were exchanged between families and the landscapes we crossed, but do enjoy!

[post_title] => Five Days Later... [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => five-days-later [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-07-30 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43256 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

Five Days Later…

Mei Chen,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

We’ve emerged from the rugged backcountry made up of rolling hills, river-cut vallies, fog covered grasslands, inset monasteries and villages. Tonight our group is resting in Rebkong – a city infamous for its Tibetan arts. Tonight blisters can finally take a break away from boots, while the rest of our bodies rest after our first […]

Posted On

07/30/11

Author

Mei Chen

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43358
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-26 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

I spoke with the instructors on the Silk Road program this morning. Things are going well for the students as they start off on their multi-day trek on the Tibetan plateau. They'll be out of internet range for the next few days. We'll keep you posted.

Thanks,

Matt

[post_title] => Beginning the Trek [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => beginning-the-trek [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-07-26 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43358 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

Beginning the Trek

Matt Burton,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

I spoke with the instructors on the Silk Road program this morning. Things are going well for the students as they start off on their multi-day trek on the Tibetan plateau. They’ll be out of internet range for the next few days. We’ll keep you posted. Thanks, Matt

Posted On

07/26/11

Author

Matt Burton

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43435
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-22 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

We have just had three days in the city of Xining, capitol of Qinghai. We have enjoyed three days of language lessons, some rest, time for laundry and evaluations. And, last night we enjoyed an evening stroll through the vegetable night market.

Today we're packing up and headed to Xunhua, about 4 hours from the city, to have a 3 night homestay in an agricultural Tibetan village. Then we'll hike out for a five day trek through monasteries to Rebkong, a city famous for its Thangka painters. These next 8 days we will be without internet connection, but hold your breath for some beautiful pictures next week when we return to Xining.

-Instructor Team

[post_title] => Leaving for Homestay & Trek [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => leaving-for-homestay-trek [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-07-22 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43435 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

Leaving for Homestay & Trek

Mei Chen,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

We have just had three days in the city of Xining, capitol of Qinghai. We have enjoyed three days of language lessons, some rest, time for laundry and evaluations. And, last night we enjoyed an evening stroll through the vegetable night market. Today we’re packing up and headed to Xunhua, about 4 hours from the […]

Posted On

07/22/11

Author

Mei Chen

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43451
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-22 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

Things I have learned so far on this trip:

1) I don't want to live in America my entire life

2) I take a ridiculous amount of things for granted

3) I don't appreciate how hard my father works to support my family enough

4) Wearing the same pair of pants for a week is just not a gross concept anymore. (If you had told me I would be doing that a few months ago I probably would have cried in disbelief)

5) Tibetan is a beautiful language

6) I am obsessed with Chinese children (ask everyone in the group, I stalk them with my camera)

7) Life without a cell phone is blissful

8) I can take a fifteen mile walk on any given day

9) I want to get my ear cartilage pierced (don't freak out Mom we'll be discussing this when I come home)

10) I don't think about the serious things enough

This list could go on forever, and it will be added to as we approach the end. Love to those in the States, see you in August!

[post_title] => 10 Things [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 10-things [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-07-22 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43451 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

10 Things

Alice Fort,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

Things I have learned so far on this trip: 1) I don’t want to live in America my entire life 2) I take a ridiculous amount of things for granted 3) I don’t appreciate how hard my father works to support my family enough 4) Wearing the same pair of pants for a week is […]

Posted On

07/22/11

Author

Alice Fort

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43486
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-21 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

My last post consisted of a very crowded train ride, and trains have been our mode of travel ever since. Kindly passengers who help us with our Chinese and children who we help with English; junk food and ramen and hot long nights. Sleepers where we pitch and roll, hard seats where we can only wish for our eyes to close and the noise to stop. And then there are buses, too, which are so insanely crowded that when we skid to a stop, every soul on the bus falls diagonally into one another, faces into faces, backpacks into stomachs, feet slipping and sliding in desperate dance.

Well, a train brought us to Lanzhou from Dunhuang, and then a bus from Lanzhou to Xining. Now I sit back in our hostel in Xining and I have time to think.

We said goodbye to Xinjiang a long time ago. Goodbye to nan bread and stony bare mountains and Uighurs and simmering heat; goodbye to Kashgar and Urumchi and crazy weddings and fragrant bazaars and words like Yakshimusiz. I did wonder, as I sat (yes, in the train; at midnight and watching the moon stay constant above a wide waste of dust and sand) if I would ever come back. Was this rugged central Asian land, was it gone forever now from me? I have no way of knowing.

And by train we are again someplace new. We are surrounded by mountains; things are green, the night is cold, and our hostel serves wildly expensive mochas. We are among Tibetans, among Hui and Han. We are far from Kashgar.

I look down the fifteen floors that stretch from my hostel window to the sidewalk. It's a dizzying drop. I remember the view from Kashgar, half a trip ago, when this country was new and alien and I felt small and confused in it. The honking and shouting and hawking of goods; watermelons and winding streets and construction and destruction and the smell of freshly baked bread. Now I no longer feel small and confused; but China never did give up its alienness, and I know I am a stranger in a strange land, as long as I remain here. And Qinghai, Gansu, Xinjiang? They may as well be different countries within themsleves. Wherever I go the place will be new and I with my blond hair and blue eyes will be strange.

I look down from the window then, see people moving about like ants on a great lopsided hill. They navigate the maze of the city, and across from my window there is aprk and then the mountains go on forever. The merest thought of the fall from my window to the ground flutters my stomach. I take my iced tea, and I tip it over the lit-up nighttime void, and I see the tea fall freely, through the air, in a stream, down down down, to become another spot on the very spotty road below.

I go down to a Tibetan lesson then, leaving the curtain fluttering in my wake. The mountains that saw the Silk Road stand sentinel over a new city motoring quietly into the future.

This place will never cease to amaze me.

[post_title] => View from Xining [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => view-from-xining [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-07-21 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43486 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

View from Xining

Katie Myers,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

My last post consisted of a very crowded train ride, and trains have been our mode of travel ever since. Kindly passengers who help us with our Chinese and children who we help with English; junk food and ramen and hot long nights. Sleepers where we pitch and roll, hard seats where we can only […]

Posted On

07/21/11

Author

Katie Myers

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43493
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-21 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 
The silk road group is on an overnight train tonight, traveling to Xining, the provincial capital of Qinghai. We left Dunhuang in Gansu, after two memorable nights in this city in the desert. We visited the mosque, the night market, and the Mogao Grottoes, but the most exciting time for the group was riding the camel in the Gobi desert and sleeping under the stars.

I'm sure there will be many camel photos to come in the next few days, but I want to post this photo yak with a focus on the subtle beauty of the sand dunes. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so I have about five thousand words worth of photos that show the shape, the color, the subtle play of light and shadow in this magical landscape. Enjoy!
[post_title] => Photo yak: desert and sand dunes [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => photo-yak-desert-and-sand-dunes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-07-21 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43493 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

Photo yak: desert and sand dunes

Boer Zhao,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

The silk road group is on an overnight train tonight, traveling to Xining, the provincial capital of Qinghai. We left Dunhuang in Gansu, after two memorable nights in this city in the desert. We visited the mosque, the night market, and the Mogao Grottoes, but the most exciting time for the group was riding the […]

Posted On

07/21/11

Author

Boer Zhao

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43494
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-21 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

No matter who we are, habit is what we turn to in times of great upheavel. For me, China counts as a great upheavel. Now if I were in a European country, I'd probably deal better. I don't look so out of place. But in China, there is no possible way I'd be mistaken for a local. The second looks, the blatant stares lessen as we go further West and into more urban areas, but I can still see them out of the corner of my eye. Still, there are someplaces I can draw comfort more than others. Thus I come to the topic of this Yak: Cities. If you haven't heard, the one requirement for college that I won't compromise on is an urban location. Cities are home to me. And even though each one is unique, there are some aspects that never change. Even in China.

This didn't really hit me until today when I was sent out with Jane to find an internet cafe. Neither of us speak good manderin (though Jane speaks enough to understand the answers to our questions... sort of). In short, we were on our own in a city that we don't know and a country whose language we can't speak. Intimidating right? Funny, but not so much to me. I'd never describe myself as an outgoing person, but the idea of asking for directons and finding a cafe doesn't intimidate me that much. If I had to go out and herd cattle or fix a chinese dish for dinner, I'm closer to panic. Find an internet cafe, easy-peasy. Atleast in theory. In reality, it was a bit more complex. We discovered the reseptionist didn't understand the words "internet cafe". She kept insisting there was internet here that we could use. I finally went for our guide book, remembering that it had a section of phrases in the back. When I got back, Jane had good and bad news. She had found the name of the cafe, but the lady that had told her thought that it was closed.

So we were back to square one. Where could be find a cafe? Inspiration hit me: the guide book. In under five minutes we had found a internet cafe, but it was the same one the lady had said was closed. But there weren't any others listed, so we took a chance and started off on our journey. It took a few minutes to orient ourselves. We couldn't find North (the sun was directly above us). But we followed the tiny map in the guide book and finally got ourselves very, very lost. We could find our way back, but we had no idea where we were. We asked for directions and only understood the hands pointing us in one direction. We walked for another five minutes and what to our wondering eyes did apear, but an internet cafe. YES! We then figured out, after much confusion with the owner, that they did accept passports for IDs. Our job was done.

We walked back and I curled up with my kindle, but didn't read. Thoughts have a way of interupting. Why hadn't the prospect of finding the cafe frightened me? I don't like going places I don't know how to get to. But I was fine, excited even. When I was in Kashgar, going to dinner was a scary thing for me. I hated not knowing what I'd get and ended up going to the same place every time. But here it was "Cool, I get to walk".

We are creatures of habit. I'm in a city here. I can hear cars and buses. I can't see the horizen because of buildings. People bump into me and I get to cut through crowds. Asking for directions? Just point me in the direction I need to go. I know cities. I understand them. China is very different in many respect, don't get me wrong. But for me a city is a city, no matter where on the globe its placed.

[post_title] => Habits and Home [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => habits-and-home [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-07-21 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43494 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

Habits and Home

Sarah Schacht,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

No matter who we are, habit is what we turn to in times of great upheavel. For me, China counts as a great upheavel. Now if I were in a European country, I’d probably deal better. I don’t look so out of place. But in China, there is no possible way I’d be mistaken for […]

Posted On

07/21/11

Author

Sarah Schacht

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 43499
    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-20 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

As we struggled to clean the sand out of our facial orifices, we reflected on our time on the Gobi desert, which, due to the absence of any serious gastro-intestinal issues, was an amazing experience. We arrived at the edge of the Gobi and I (Isabella) promptly broke my camera. We hopped on our camels and rode off into the expansive sand dunes. My (Jane) camel, lovingly dubbed Tyrone Crack Jeremiah. It was seriously diseased. We arrived at our campsite, and climbed to the top of a huge dune and had half an hour to reflect on our place in the world. Looking out at the vast desert we all found a new maturity within ourselves. We also had some time to roll around in the sand. The two of us rolled down the dune together. It kind of really hurt, but was a lot of fun. Everyone slept outside, excited about sleeping under the stars. No one anticipated the mild sandstorm. We had trouble finding McKay because he was burried in the sand. We left Dunhuang on a fifteen hour sleeper train where we practiced our mandarin and made some new friends. I (Isabella) woke up with a pile of sand in my sleeper. Now we be chillin' in Xinning, Qinghai at the Lete Hostel where we had our very first Tibetan lesson which everyone loved. We are all excited to contuinue learning about Buddism and Tibetan culture.

Isabella and Jane

[post_title] => Gobi [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => gobi [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-07-20 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=43499 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 324 [name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [slug] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 324 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 251 [count] => 70 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 18.1 [cat_ID] => 324 [category_count] => 70 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 [category_nicename] => silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011 [category_parent] => 251 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/summer-2011/silk-road-linking-people-and-traditions-summer-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011 )

Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

View post

Gobi

Jane Rossman and Isabella Dorfman,Silk Road: Linking People and Traditions, Summer 2011

Description

As we struggled to clean the sand out of our facial orifices, we reflected on our time on the Gobi desert, which, due to the absence of any serious gastro-intestinal issues, was an amazing experience. We arrived at the edge of the Gobi and I (Isabella) promptly broke my camera. We hopped on our camels […]

Posted On

07/20/11

Author

Jane Rossman and Isabella Dorfman

1 2 3 7