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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011


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Dear Rwanda Families,
This weekend marks the end of our Bolivia program and students will be arriving back home to share their tales with each of you.
One of our Dragons instructors will be flying back home with the group. They will work with all students to ensure that they find their domestic connections. They will be in contact with us if they suspects any delays or any other logistical issues arrise.
We wish all students are great trip home and please leave us a voicemessage on extension 30 if you are not able to reach us during office hours.
Sincerely,
Boulder Admin
To check on the status of the groups international flight, please refer to:
ethiopian.airlines.flights24.com
The students are traveling home on the following Flight:

Returning Flight:
August 7th, 2011
Ethiopian Airlines, ET 806
Depart: Kigali (KGL) 4:00pm
(stopover/refuel in Entebbe, Uganda)
Arrive: Addis Ababa Bole (ADD) 7:30pm

August 7th, 2011
Ethiopian Airlines, ET 500
Depart: Addis Ababa Bole (ADD) 10:15pm
(stopover/refuel in Rome, Italy)
Arrive: Washington DC (IAD) 8:40am
(August 8th )

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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Return Flight Information

Dragons Administration,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

Dear Rwanda Families, This weekend marks the end of our Bolivia program and students will be arriving back home to share their tales with each of you. One of our Dragons instructors will be flying back home with the group. They will work with all students to ensure that they find their domestic connections. They […]

Posted On

08/3/11

Author

Dragons Administration

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The Beijing night market. Illumined in crimson-gold radiance. Cries of beggars and hawkers vibrate eternally in the air. Pollution as thick as silence corrupts my cheeks. Pungent aromas; allusions of greed and compassion. Mouth sealed as if stuffed with antipathic baozi. Clouds gather together to form a unified barrier to the loudly twinkling stars. The scarlet of the city is reflected in their baseless eyes…

After wandering in this hectic expanse of partially concealed bureaucracy, and appreciating the half-hearted Maoist propaganda, I stumble across a street vendor offering squirming scorpions on a bamboo stick. Their blood-red bodies repel me, seem to speak tragically of the secret blood spilled at the hands of the Chinese government. Yet the vendor’s toothless grin, and the dirt-caked bamboo invite me to try a morsel of this alien creature, living history.

I imagine the centuries, perhaps millennia, this scorpion had witnessed. These foreign foodstuffs have cautiously observed pre-history, noted the rise and fall of nations, the uniquely ephemeral transition of the seasons. Their eyes had marveled at Marco Polo, wandered the texts of Confucius, and gazed dreamily at the Yellow Emperor under the celestial stars, floating on the river of mercury. And now they fearlessly stared into mine…
I ask the vendor to hand me three prime insects. He lifts the bamboo kebab fully adorned with salsa dancing scorpions. He plunges the stake into flaming oil and the exoskeleton boogie ends.

I grasp hold of the bamboo, cultural icon, and bite deep into the solid carapace. I am inexplicably revolutionized.

Juicy torrents of knowledge flood my brain. I feel in this moment the foreshadowing of events to come. I see through the eyes of the world…

A mystic form of déjà vu engulfs me. My legs pound beneath me, fleeing the raucous bites of the DOGS of China, the archaic chanting of Buddhist monks imbibe with my soul, a long lost elixir, torches from a Naxi funeral surface deluge all senses with truth… In the perimeter of my eyesight, where dreams can become reality, I see the Jade Emperor, ruler of heaven and of earth, beckoning to me.

“It is an honor…” I tell him.

Words appear, axioms of green flame. “I would not consider it such.” He confides to me. “My country is no longer how it once was. China is not the Middle Kingdom. One thousand years ago, my people furnished the world with Jade. Invisibility, flight, and eternal life, were realities with this sensational stone. Now the Chinese populace provide the earth with Macdonald’s magnets, and Walmart widgets. Our integrity has vanished…” And with that, the forgotten ruler of universe faded into miasmatic jade.

I was transported back into my cheap, Chinese-manufactured Teva sandals.

I reminisced upon my recent sage-green encounter. Instead of agreeing with the knower of all things, I decided to come to my own conclusions.

Deep in my stomach sat the poison of a scorpion. And it was it’s bitter-sweet pain which provided me with the answers…

China admittedly, has many vices; corruption and poverty to say the least. Through my time here I have been able to examine these fundamental debasements. I have spoken to the young, the old, the city-folk, as well as the villagers, and I have come to a personal conclusion. Perhaps it is the hypocritical perversions of a New-England bred boy, who has constant access to most “Western Necessities”, but this six week excursion throughout the most influential nation of this century has provided me with wild and new perspectives.

Despite the digressions of the government, I have come to notice the inherent goodness of people I have met and associated myself with. Whole families will welcome an individual into their homes, and strive to make their experience the best it could aspire to be. Random passerby on the streets are curious and kind to those who they pass by, and I have received the addresses of numerous people I have had less than a five minute conversation with. The phrases: “Come to my home! I will provide dinner! Meet my family!” rings in my ears. I am sure that I will never forget these people, and have concluded that although they live on the other side of the globe, they are my brothers, my sisters, my children and my parents.

And now, I am positive that the poison of the scorpion will burn like fire in my belly, to remind me of these truths, and of the experiences that I have witnessed in this bitter-sweet nation…

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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Fire in My Belly

Nathaniel Hansen,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

The Beijing night market. Illumined in crimson-gold radiance. Cries of beggars and hawkers vibrate eternally in the air. Pollution as thick as silence corrupts my cheeks. Pungent aromas; allusions of greed and compassion. Mouth sealed as if stuffed with antipathic baozi. Clouds gather together to form a unified barrier to the loudly twinkling stars. The […]

Posted On

08/3/11

Author

Nathaniel Hansen

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Humans live in circles.

A few days ago, I had meeting with my ISP teacher. She gave up poetry three years ago, after graduating from college and going to work, where she realized she couldn’t live as part of the world and as a poet; she wasn’t strong enough. I wanted to know why.

In ancient China, poets traveled constantly, visiting other poets, drinking, and writing. Many of the most famous Tang poems are “Farewell Poems,” written from one poet to another on the occasion of their parting. These poems aren’t airy—the images are heavy, the emotions thick and lingering. Take Li Bai’s “Seeing off Du Fu at Stone Gate” for example:

A few

spare days

linger

before our

drunken goodbye.

We’ve walked

this

mountain

We’ve seen

the

pagodas

that hover

by

the lakeside

but how long

until

you pass through

and

we fill our cups

again?

Ripples of autumn

reflect

on the water

and

the water

brightens them,

makes them

brilliant.

but Autumn grasses

fly far

and

away

so

for the time being

let’s drink

these cups

dry.

Poetry was the medium for communication only among these people. There are feelings in the poems meant only for other poets to understand, making poetry especially hard to translate. This is the reason so many translators, fluent in the Chinese language but not in that of poetry, produce empty poems—shells of what was written by the original poet. When a poet translates a poem, however, they aren’t translating, they are re-creating. When I translate these Tang poems, I make them my own, in a sense. I let in the feeling of the poem and let it mingle with my own understandings of that feeling. When I translate, I think on how, if the poet were a modern-day American, they would express this feeling and write this poem. I enter the Circle of Poets. This circle is what my teacher told me about. Poets do not often meet in person—their feelings and expressions do. She told me that, in college, she would stay up until the early morning scribbling out poetry in the dark. During the day, she would often sit alone, away from her friends, and read the poetry of others. They all would ask why she was sad, but they were wrong—she was engaging with the universal aloneness of the poet, and the universal connection that comes with it; she was happy in a way they couldn’t understand. Poets are alone in that they experience the world in a way others do not, and the only way to experience it is for them to have only the company of their own thoughts. But, the product of this aloneness allows the connection. When one poet reads the writing of another, they tap into this unique alone-connection. They understand the necessity of the aloneness to produce the type of thoughts (the kind with the unmistakable tinge of the poet) to write the poem, but fully appreciate that the exact feeling exists in a different expression in another person. They also know that someone is reading their poetry and reacting the same way. Though these poets are alone physically —often away from their friends with a pen and a notebook—they are unmistakably all present mentally and emotionally. Every poet is reaching for this place beyond language, this Poet Logos—they are all similar in that search and the way they express it, they are all similar in that those around them cannot understand it.

This is not the only circle I know. I’ve entered a circle now much similar to that of the poets, a circle of people all reaching for a similar goal. Each, also, with their own way of expressing it. I know that when this circle scatters and each person goes to their own home, we’ll be among people who cannot see what we are reaching for, who don’t understand our reaching. This group is Dragons. We are reaching for our better selves, we are reaching for a home past our own nation, we are reaching for a place and time where patriotism is unnecessary. I will not forget. I have met people who I’ve known for a lifetime and a only a short flash. Time expands and contracts drastically over here: lifetimes and flashes, temples and skyscrapers, chopsticks and hamburgers, but the circle does not warp, it only grows more full. After I return home, years could pass before I see them, but it’s not seeing each other in person that matters really, is it? It’s being there mentally and emotionally. Time and space can’t touch that.

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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Circles

Matthew Mattia,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

Humans live in circles. A few days ago, I had meeting with my ISP teacher. She gave up poetry three years ago, after graduating from college and going to work, where she realized she couldn’t live as part of the world and as a poet; she wasn’t strong enough. I wanted to know why. In […]

Posted On

08/3/11

Author

Matthew Mattia

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"I hear the sound of fields of mulberry trees becoming oceans"

- Liu Xiyi

An image of my yeye has been haunting my mind for a few dats now, especially as I've been translating the poem "A Substitute for the Melancholy of the White-haired Old Man." He would sit somtimes in the courtyard on his hobbit-sized chair, wearing a beret and oversized military jacket, though he was never a soldier. He would sit there and watch the rolling of clouds, the subtle changes in the hues of the sky, the spilling of water from basin to basin by the kitchen; the shifts and whispers of the passage of time in his courtyard.

I'd thought before on his bo'ai, his tremendous love--in his smiling laugh, his laughing smile, and the funny way he cocked his head when he did, almost like the chickens he'd lived with for so many decades (to me, unimaginable spans of time), but I'd never considered his silence and what that was telling me.

From the great swoops of his hands when he spoke, his eyes -like unsettled water- that breathed in his surroundings, and those face-wide smiles, I knew he was a man of strong feeling and heavy thoughts-- thoughts more numerous than these hundreds of prayer flags chattering out a sound like the folding of blankets. When the sun shines through them, they're all the same color. When the sun shines through them, it's easy to see they're all from the same yearning, too.

"How long is sweet and delicate youth? In an instant our hair will be as white as crane feathers-- like threads of silk thrown into a tangle."

- Liu Xiyi

There was so much I was missing in my conversations with my yeye-- his words lost heat to the surroundings as they left his mouth. There was so much more his silence could tell me, though. His silence taught me about time-- about something it took him years to learn, I'm sure, and something he hopes that I, his son, can learn sooner. His silence taught me why he smiled-- about using time well, because there isn't time; using time for bo'ai. It's about time I stop getting annoyed at those I love over the silliest of things, because it's just like spitting at the sunset-- spitting at something so majestic that words break down before it.

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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A Substitute for the Melancholy of the White-Haired Old Man

Matthew Mattia,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

"I hear the sound of fields of mulberry trees becoming oceans" – Liu Xiyi An image of my yeye has been haunting my mind for a few dats now, especially as I’ve been translating the poem "A Substitute for the Melancholy of the White-haired Old Man." He would sit somtimes in the courtyard on his […]

Posted On

07/31/11

Author

Matthew Mattia

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Journal entry at a temple
Part 1
Buddhism promoted peace and selflessness, I thought. Yet wandering through the temple today, paying entrance fees and gazing at the illustrations gave me quite a different feel of the religion. The entire complex feels commercialized to me - signs for tourists are everywhere, along with trashcans and little vendors. Even monks work at the desks of souvenir shops, selling trinkets and "blessing" them. The monastery is magnificent though, with huge soaring temples surrounded by traditional houses and dwellings. However, even as I sit quietly in a corner of an empty prayer room, I can't feel a connection. All I can think about is the startling grotesque and vivid imagery around me. Devils killing evildoers whilst peaceful figures look down from above is not comforting to me. Neither is the disturbing illustrations of colorful half animal gods having sex. Going to a token private school, I have read one of the Dalai Lama's books on who we are as human beings and what he believes in and all that... And I cannot for the life of me connect it with what I see here. With droves of tourists and signs imploring them to stop taking pictures, I cannot find the inner peacefulness I read about, and I do not see the kindness and loving of all humans in the illustrations that line the temples. What I do see is a 100 kuai ticket, monks selling merchandise, and the smoke of huge insane sticks, each competing to be the largest and most noticeable.

Part 2
Now I sit on a broken beam, part of an empty construction sight tucked into the monastery's living quarters. The trashcans here are behind a wall, seemingly in storage, and besides the quiet chatter of a couple monks I am alone. This quarter I'm in has not been dressed up for tourists, rather it is barren and simple. Here I can see how the monks live. I also notice the foundations of this place: I have a great view of the valley situated on this hill. The stone below the tourists' sidewalk is old and the walls are stucco. Grass grows on faded wooden roofs. Obviously I have a critical eye, but in one aspect this temple seems like the rest of china: there is empty construction everywhere. I don't yet know why this temple was built in this location, but I can understand that in the past few decades its face at least has changed. Tourism and commercialism are now what I see as the reason this Monastery still exists, but there has to be the religion hidden here somewhere. At first I was sceptical of the temple as genuine, not just some tourist attraction, but I feel like this place turned to tourism purely out of need. Upkeep for a temple of 600 monks costs alot, and the illustrations and frescoes on the wall, which I am told are called Thangka paintings, are definitely not 10 kuai a piece. And it is beautiful, but I still can't find any meaning inside the individual temples. For example, I believe statues can represent something much more powerful, a symbol that people connect with, but these idols seem empty and hollow. There is no mention of meaning behind them, just donated money at their feet and wilting flowers on the floor. The temple makes me think of an idolized ideal; truly the morals and teachings of Buddha are valuable and helpful, but you are supposed to pray to the god and follow his teachings, not pray to his clay idols and pay for certified trinkets. At the same time, its not fair for me to be so critical and skeptical, since a) I can't read most of the chinese descriptions, as touristy as they may seem, and b) I do not know the history behind the temple or the individual statues. I need more info...

Reflection after a visit to a Thangka painting centre

Part 3
After we visited the temple on the outskirts of Zhongdian, we had a class at a thangka painting centre near our hostel. The owner was Buddhist, and before our drawing class he held a discussion/class about Buddhism and thangka painting. His friend, an ordained Lama, also participated. They explained Buddhism by simply focusing on the 4 noble truths, all the while connecting Buddhism to the illustrations and frescoes we had seen at the temple. They talked about how different sentient beings were represented, how some were embellished to stress their message or role. Obviously I was not alone in noticing the rampant tourism at the monastery, because the most important question anyone asked was wether the tourism was important to believers and the temple, if buddhists really did pray to the idols an believe in gods, and how could Buddhism still coexist with such commercialism? Our speakers seemed to know where we were coming from, as if they had anticipated the questions. They explained that, first of all, true buddhists do not pray to statues in the sense that they do not believe that a statue is a god. Rather, they use them as a lightning rod to direct their prayers, which in fact are not about money or luck or even about themselves. The goal of a real Buddhist is to visit the temple frequently to pray for sentient beings, like buddhas. Buddhism does not necassarily have a god or gods, said the Lama, because the Buddhas are enlightned humans, and we all have this potential. Most importantly, when we discussed the 4 noble truths the Lama explained clealy (and this I did know, but it made sooo much sense actually experieinceing/noticing this dilemma) that suffering comes from greed and jealousy, which all stem from ignorance. Ignorance, like the final puzzle piece, answered all my questions. All the tourists coming to the temple did not understand Buddhism any more than I did. They simply wanted money and luck and "tried out" buddhism. Those with the cameras and misinformed ideas that thought visiting a temple was like going to the beach for a day simply fueled the creation of a mask - the tourists themselves made it look like a commercialized sell-out of a temple. Real pigrims simply used the statues as vessels for the prayers. Most importantly perhaps, I was ignorant when I made my original observations. True, they are valid nontheless, but now I understand why certain gods are drawn fiercesome and some with palms tilted outwards. Our speakers didn't answer every question directly, and of course I sill have my doubts, but I'm glad I got a more positive and legitimate view of Buddhism.I will never understand that particular illustration of those green 'friends' doing 'stuff; together, but at least I understand the picture next to it. :)

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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A Day With Buddhism

Sam Koffman ,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

Journal entry at a temple Part 1 Buddhism promoted peace and selflessness, I thought. Yet wandering through the temple today, paying entrance fees and gazing at the illustrations gave me quite a different feel of the religion. The entire complex feels commercialized to me – signs for tourists are everywhere, along with trashcans and little […]

Posted On

07/31/11

Author

Sam Koffman

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Last night, as I was emptying my daypack I found that my camera was missing. After a mild panic attack I came to the conclusion that I had left it at the program house, and that it wasn'tlying in the back seat of a taxi somewhere in Kunming (population 2 million). This morning I arrived at the program house to find my camera resting safetly on top of the computer desk (wheww).

Now in a great, sort of care free mood, I decided to flip through the photos to see what I would have lost.. and wouldn't be able to share with my family and friends back home. Many of our experiences could only be illustrated with photos. For instance, our first big trip was a day hike to the Great Wall.

When we arrived at the beginning of the trail leading up through the mountains that would eventually connect us to the Wall the mist wasvery thick. It obscured our view of anything farther than100 feet in front of us! So, when we finally made it to the Wall we could only see short sections of it, and none of the surrounding mountains. But, after an hour or so, the mist cleared up and revealed the most spectacular view! It was so beautiful, magical..... wonderful?... Like I said it would be impossible for my words to do justice to the view (Photos below).

Here are some of the cool, notable photos I've taken so far.. photos that I would be devastated to have lost.

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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(Old Yak that never posted.. Photos will be in a later, separate Yak!!)

Phil Barnhart,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

Last night, as I was emptying my daypack I found that my camera was missing. After a mild panic attack I came to the conclusion that I had left it at the program house, and that it wasn’tlying in the back seat of a taxi somewhere in Kunming (population 2 million). This morning I arrived […]

Posted On

07/30/11

Author

Phil Barnhart

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    [post_content] => we are in SHANG GRI LA!!! (unfortunately, not the actual lost city). we were supposed to go to dechin soon, but because of the rain the road is closed :(. we have had so much fun thusfar, though everybody is tired from the bus ride from haba snow mountain. well i got to go there are people ion line waiting to post a yak. BYE!
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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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cant go to dechin

avery chiao,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

we are in SHANG GRI LA!!! (unfortunately, not the actual lost city). we were supposed to go to dechin soon, but because of the rain the road is closed :(. we have had so much fun thusfar, though everybody is tired from the bus ride from haba snow mountain. well i got to go there […]

Posted On

07/30/11

Author

avery chiao

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    [post_date] => 2011-07-29 00:00:00
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    [post_content] => 

Greetings to all those in the world who were wondering where we are,

this awesome dragons program is currently in Shangri-la, or Zhongdian. We just came from Haba Village, which was a small muslim minority village located high in the mountains of Yunnan. The drive there was long, to say the least, but totally worth it. The views from the windows of our bus were breathtaking - soaring mountains topped in clouds, covered in forests and breaking off into looming cliffs above us. Driving through tiger leaping gorge at 7pm was an experience. There is one road that has somehow managed to cling to the side of the cliff. 5 feet outside the bus is at least a 400 foot drop, above us another 400 feet of sheer rock. Our driver, being the proffesional cliff surviver he is, got us through safely (but we were freaking out the whole time). Haba was cold, beautiful, and quiet. We star-gazed, picked mushrooms, and ate chinese brisket. Now we are in Shangri-la, staying at a nice hostel with the kindest owner you will ever meet. We have encountered slight problems about the transportation to the next part of our journey, Deqin (There is one road, and its blocked off, so there is no transportation...) and this lady has helped us so much in coming up with many back-up plans. Right now we are at the state of the journey where we love squat toilets that flush, dont mind showering every third day, and love the feeling of our jeans after a week of wearing them. This is what its all about.

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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Travel Update

Sam Koffman,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

Greetings to all those in the world who were wondering where we are, this awesome dragons program is currently in Shangri-la, or Zhongdian. We just came from Haba Village, which was a small muslim minority village located high in the mountains of Yunnan. The drive there was long, to say the least, but totally worth […]

Posted On

07/29/11

Author

Sam Koffman

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Howdy everyone!

So we left our rural homestay in Nanyaocun a few days ago. We were assigned to write a story of some sort from the perspective of one of our homestay family members and what we think their impression was of us. I'd like to share my writing with you. I wrote this piece from the perspective of my jiejie, Yingli. She was really like a sister to me, and I'm missing her a lot right now! All my love to her.

There's the gate. She must be home from class. Time to start lunch. She eats the corn six spoonfuls at a time, so I'll need a big bowl of that.

"Ni hao jiejie!" I can't help but smile every time she says that. I miss my little sister, but this girl with red hair is temporarily filling her shoes.

Now she's washing her clothes again. So many clothes! And they're all blue, black, brown, and grey. And nothing comesabove the knee. And her shoes areall muddy. I guess that's her style.

As we eat we just smile at each other. She asks me aboutwhat we're doing tonight, and as I answer I can tell that she's understanding maybe half of what I'm saying. Yet she smiles enthusiasticly and says "Hao!" Now it's back to just smiling at each other. It's nice though, I don't feel awkward around her.

"Hen hao chi!" she says as she finishes off the bowl of corn. Every single meal she comments on how good the food is, and it always makes me smile.

Now she'll continue to struggle with hand washing her clothes, and then we'll go to Lily's and she'll sit while all my relatives ask questions about her. Then we'll hold hands and dance and smile, just like sisters do.

~ Jaz

(with Sam reading over my shoulder...)

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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Someone Else's Shoes

Jazmyn Tanski,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

Howdy everyone! So we left our rural homestay in Nanyaocun a few days ago. We were assigned to write a story of some sort from the perspective of one of our homestay family members and what we think their impression was of us. I’d like to share my writing with you. I wrote this piece […]

Posted On

07/29/11

Author

Jazmyn Tanski

WP_Post Object
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    [post_author] => 39
    [post_date] => 2011-07-25 00:00:00
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    [post_content] => 

Hello all! We’re sitting on the porch of Lily’s courtyard house as it’s raining and sharing stories of pre-course conceptions of each other and how silly they were. At the same time, a village kid is running around the courtyard with flowers in hand and a mother hen is feeding her chicks in a building on the other side. I’m missing my yeye already and we haven’t even left yet. But, tomorrow we do! It’s about time we share the tentative schedule for our travel.

Tuesday/July 26:

8:00 am: Meet at school

8:30 am: Leave by bus for Haba Snow Mountain

1-1:30 pm: Arrive in Haba

1:30-2:30: Lunch

3-4:30: Lesson on Islam

4:30-5:30: Chinese class

5:30-7: Free time/ISP work time

7-8: Dinner

8:30-9:30: Night Walk

9:30-whenever: Chilling with the group

Wednesday/July 27:

7:30: Breakfast

8:00: Morning Meeting

8:45-12: Chinese herbal medicine lesson

12:30: Lunch

1:30-4:30: Chinese class

4:30-7: Free time/ISP Time

7-8: Dinner

8-whenever: Chilling with the group

Thursday/July 28:

7:30: Breakfast

8: Morning Meeting

9-1: Trip to Cave of the Immortals

1-2: Lunch

2-5: Chinese class

5-6: Cultural lesson

6-8: Free Time/ISP Time

8: Dinner

9-whenever: Chilling with the group

Friday/July 29:

By 8:30: Leave from Haba

2: Arrive in Shangrila

3: Visit to largest monastery in Southwestern China

Saturday/July 30:

Morning: Visit to smaller temple

Afternoon: Chinese Class

Sunday/July 31:

Morning: Short Chinese Class

Until afternoon: Explore, Write Yaks, and Pack

Afternoon: To Deqin, sleep in Deqin

Monday/August 1:

Morning Chinese Class

Stay in Deqin lodge near Sacred Waterfall

Day hike along pilgrimage path to Sacred Waterfall

Tuesday/August 2:

Morning Chinese Class

Camp in Deqin area

Day hike to glacier or Meili Xue Mountain

Wednesday/August 3:

Morning Chinese Class

Camp in Deqin area

Day hike to glacier or Meili Xue Mountain

Thursday/August 4:

Return to Kunming by night bus and prepare to begin transference activities

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China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

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Through Snow and Mountains: A Tentative Schedule

Matthew Mattia,China: Language Intensive , Summer 2011

Description

Hello all! We’re sitting on the porch of Lily’s courtyard house as it’s raining and sharing stories of pre-course conceptions of each other and how silly they were. At the same time, a village kid is running around the courtyard with flowers in hand and a mother hen is feeding her chicks in a building […]

Posted On

07/25/11

Author

Matthew Mattia

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