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SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS


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    [post_content] => Students are passing through customs and airport security, and will be boarding their flight for Hong Kong soon.

Thanks again for a great semester!
    [post_title] => At Beijing Airport
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At Beijing Airport

Instructors,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

Students are passing through customs and airport security, and will be boarding their flight for Hong Kong soon. Thanks again for a great semester!

Posted On

04/30/17

Author

Instructors

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    [post_content] => Where there be dragons? Well, we found them.

While we were deep in the towering mountains of Guizhou, Jack, Paul and I set out on a long, arduous trek. We wandered and wandered aimlessly for hours. We hiked past great bodies of water and through the thickest of forests. But suddenly, at the top of a great mountain, we sensed the presence of something greater. The entrance to a dark and daunting cave loomed in the distance. And so, the three of us rapelled down the steep mountain side to inquire on our curiosity.

As we grew closer to the cave we could sense the strength of its chi. The entrance concealed what was a vast pit of darkness and only marked the beginning of a long journey. We approached the cave with apprehension and as we arrived at its doorstep our suspicions were confirmed. A cacophonous roar that could be heard across the mountain ranges bellowed from inside. The roar of a great dragon!

Alas, we were only three mortals. Our efforts alone would not be enough to take on the mighty dragon. Thus, we reluctantly returned to base camp in search of reinforcements. We relayed the accounts of our reconnaissance, and amalgamated a squadron of 8 others. 7 of our own, and our adamant guide Tang大哥. Unfortunately, 李老师 was in a great slumber and we were deprived of his world renowned spear throwing skills.

At sunrise, we embarked on our journey to accomplish our ultimate goal; to slay a mighty dragon worthy of our efforts. After a monsoon soaked the lands before daylight, we crossed the rushing rapids of remote rivers and hiked higher than the heavens to meet our match.

We arrived anxious, yet confident. Our strategy and weaponry would surely outmatch the force of the Dragon... or so we thought. Our initial reconnaissance gave us little intel on the inner workings of the cave. Lead by our brave instructor and cave strategist Julie, we entered. The entry room of the Dragon's lair was a grand entrance that funneled into a narrow passageway. The path was precarious, with rushing water gushing out into side collection pools. On our way down into the narrow passageway, instructor Matt and student Serene lost their footing on the slippery slopes and were carried away by the current into the collection pools. We had no other choice but to leave them behind and carry on with our mission. We knew in our hearts it was what they would have wanted.

Our journey into the single passageway turned into a labyrinth of tunnels and side vents. We wandered for days and days through the tunnels, using the aura of the dragon's chi to guide us into his central chamber. We passed by skeletons of fallen cave dwellers and past journeymen on our way, and eventually we had reached our final destination.

In a flurry of adrenaline and excitement, student Jacob charged straight for the dragon triumphantly yelling "杀掉!" Jacob went out in a blaze of glory as his passion and hubris ultimately led to his downfall as the dragon overpowered him.

After seeing Jacob perish in his direct approach, the nimble and deft gymnast Paul, set out on a side route seeking to flank the dragon. As Paul valiantly ran across the sides of the chamber looking for his opportunity to strike, he was no match for the quickness of the dragon and also succumbed to the mighty Dragon.

With two more fallen members, our ranks were reduced to instructor Julie, guide Tang大哥, student Jack, and myself.

Student Jack emerged as the next victim, oh wait, I mean challenger. After seeing combative approaches fail, Jack elected for a more strategical plan. He tactfully approached the dragon in peace and attempted to entertain the dragon. With his silliness and humor he performed the most elegant of modern dances hoping to distract the dragon. However, the dragon soon grew unamused and Jack fell at the hands of the dragon, dabbing to the very end.

After seeing three students all perish within a matter of minutes, instructor Julie had thoughts of job security loom ominously in her mind, but was still focused on the task at hand. Julie attempted to combine the strategies of all the students. She directly approached the dragon, and in the only Canadian way she knew how, she politely asked the dragon to let the rest of us free claiming we were no match for the dragon. Yet again, the dragon was unrelenting and would satisfy no such request. However, Julie was ready to strike. She used her Canadian background as a facade of her cunning strategy. She tricked the dragon into lunging at her and gracefully sidestepped around the dragon's strike landing weakening blows to the dragon. Julie and the dragon engaged in a great duel for the ages, but again she was no match for the power and dexterity of the dragon.

This left just Tang大哥, myself and a weakened and now flustered dragon. Tang大哥 thought this was the opportune moment to strike and used his array of handmade spears and arrows landing hit after hit. Yet like all the others that had come before him, he was no match for the dragon.

With a heavy heart, I stood strong as the last challenger of our team, adamant in finishing our quest. However, killing the dragon ourselves was clearly not possible. Generations of adventurers and soldiers had come and gone, with no successes. Thus I devised a unique and cogent plan.

I challenged the dragon to a race to see who could catch the sun first. As I had learned from my Chinese class in the ancient tale of "夸父追日" or "Kuafu chases the Sun," even the bravest and strongest perished at the hands of the Sun. Being that my Chinese name is 马小虎 and that I was born in the year of the tiger, I identify with the character traits of a tiger. I claimed that I admired the strength of the dragon, as we were the two top animals of the food chain. However, there could not be enough room for two predators at the top. I boasted about how in ancient Chinese folk tale the Tiger beat the Dragon in the Zodiac race, placing 3rd out of 12 while the dragon placed 5th and that I would be able to represent the tiger and beat the dragon in a race to chase the sun! I said that if I won the race I would be let free to return to the mainland and tell tall tales of how mighty of a dragon he was and that no human could defeat him. But if he won the race I said I would relinquish myself to his will and would acknowledge that he indeed was the mightiest of dragons and that a Tiger is ultimately no match, putting the Dragon at the top of the zodiac food chain. Satisfied with the outcome of either side, the Dragon agreed to my terms.

And so, at day break we set off on our race. However, I had no intention to actually race. As I had predicted the dragon immediately took off for the eastern horizon as the sun emerged over the mountain peaks of the village. Because the dragon had only ever seen the inside of the cave, he did not know what path the sun would take. Thus, as the sun rose higher into the sky the dragon flew higher and higher past the heavens to chase the sun. In his own hubris the dragon was confident that he would be able to catch the sun, as I was only a mere mortal and would be no match for his flying abilities. However, no matter how high the dragon went, he was never able to catch the sun. As the dragon slowly ran out of energy, he began falling out of the sky and symbolically began his great downfall. As I waited below I could see his great shadow fall from the heavens and eventually see the dragon plummet into the ground.

As I approached the dragon, it was immobile and on its last breaths. I felt some degree of empathy for the dragon. Its confidence and ego was built up over generations, only to be the source of its tragic fall as it saw the light of day for the first time. No matter, I needed to avenge my fallen students and instructors. As the dragon lay in front of me, suffering and helpless, I took its life in one decisive strike.

Upon my return to the village, I relayed tales of tragedy and triumph. Instructor Ming, who elected not to join us, suggested to have a feast with the entire village to commemorate the lives of the fallen. In his excitement of having so much dragon to eat, and his inner desire to not waste any food, Ming ate too much of the dragon not knowing that many of the organs are deadly, including the organ that allows the dragon to breath fire. In his attempt to "sweep" and finish off the rest of the food, he ingested the fire breathing organ, fatally burning himself on the inside.

And so, this left just me. The lone survivor, a maverick, to tell the epic tales of our adventures and battles. So I write to you today, in memory of the fallen 7. Their lives shall be forever etched in history, as this great tale will be passed on from generation to generation, as a precaution against the hubris and shortcomings of mankind.
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Finding Dragons

Philip Milana,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

Where there be dragons? Well, we found them. While we were deep in the towering mountains of Guizhou, Jack, Paul and I set out on a long, arduous trek. We wandered and wandered aimlessly for hours. We hiked past great bodies of water and through the thickest of forests. But suddenly, at the top of […]

Posted On

04/30/17

Author

Philip Milana

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    [post_content] => We are enjoying our last full day in China, at a village by the Great Wall. We hiked a 'wild' (not restored) section of the Wall yesterday, and today we are talking about going home - what it means, what to expect, how to make sense of this semester in China. Thank you to all families and friends for your support in making this semester a great success! The following is a collection of responses from all five students, for what they need YOU to know.

I Need You to Know...

My time spent in China was not wasted and I don’t regret a moment. I have built memories, relationships and values that I will carry with me for as long as I can. In these months I have come to value and appreciate a more simple life, more than that the immense feeling of community in small and large ways that we have seen throughout our travels. I have learned that communities like this can exist anywhere, but it does not come naturally – it is built with understanding, perseverance and love. When I return I hope to continue to build and make use of the skills I have focused on through our trip: relationship building, self awareness and leadership. These months have been a real adventure, and know that this trip hasn’t changed me, but I have grown. I can’t wait to come back to spend some time with everyone and share stories of our adventures, then we can embark on some of our own. Love you all.

 

Going to China was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made and these past few months were some of the most enjoyable in my life. The perspectives, knowledge, and relationships I’ve gained are priceless in value. When I return to the states I hope to apply these new perspectives to my daily life and continue pursuing new found passions I have discovered here in China. In such a short amount of time, I have discovered paths, opportunities and contacts that open up a whole new world of possibilities for my future that I had never seriously considered before this trip. I hope that my Chinese and interest in China will remain adamant through college and into my professional career as I utilize new found skills and abilities gained over the trip. These past three months have been some of the most memorable, and I hope to cherish the relationships and memories I have accumulated over the course of the trip as I return home. Thank you Mom and Dad for supporting me on this journey, it was worth it and so much more.

 

…that despite the expectation that I will have a lot to say, I don’t yet. As of this writing, I haven’t even left China yet. I am not full of pent-up things waiting to be shared, or things that I “need” others to know right now. I have had a great time here and I am more than happy to answer questions, but I most likely won’t initiate conversations about my experience here unless I am asked.

That said, I need you to know that I have missed all of you and I am excited to see everyone soon.

 

I want to improve myself.
I really like China.
I want genuine relationships with the people I know.
I want to enjoy home more.
I hope I have changed as a person.
I will be more appreciative of what I have.
I will reconsider my ambitions.
I will try to understand your thoughts no matter how little they reconcile with mine.
I want to take an interest in you.
I miss you.
The U.S. seems boring to me now.

 

I am so grateful to have grown up in such a loving and supportive environment. I would like to thank my mom especially for being the most stubborn, strong minded and down to earth person I know. You are my rock and my inspiration; I would be a completely different person if it weren’t for all the advice and help you’ve given me throughout the past 19 years. At times we get into arguments, but I mostly think you’ve passed your wits onto me (not complaining) and I don’t say how much I appreciate and respect you. As for my Dad, thank you for being such a hard working yet loving individual, your dedication and determination is truly an inspiration. I appreciate you both for raising such a beautiful family. After being away from home this past year for school then dragons I’ve had the opportunity to grow as an individual and I can’t go without saying I miss being little. You made life so easy, and words can’t express how grateful I am for that. I know this summer will go back to things being unsaid and we will all grow annoyed with each other but for now I’m happy to say I miss my parents, brothers, and mei mei. See you all really soon.
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I Need You to Know

Students,Best Notes From The Field, SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

We are enjoying our last full day in China, at a village by the Great Wall. We hiked a ‘wild’ (not restored) section of the Wall yesterday, and today we are talking about going home – what it means, what to expect, how to make sense of this semester in China. Thank you to all […]

Posted On

04/29/17

Author

Students

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We are now reflecting on the past 80-odd days within the shadow of the Great Wall.  During our final X-phase that ended at the Lama Temple in Beijing, we started by, (as planned) taking a pair of trains to get to Zhongwei.  On our first day in the city, we visited the Gao temple, exploring an underground dungeon with artwork depicting a Chinese version of hell.  While the temples we had visited had mostly subscribed to the Tibetan and Theravada forms of Buddhism, which lack concepts of heaven and hell, the Buddhism in this temple was that of the Han Chinese.  The next day brought us to the tourist hub of Shapotou, where we enjoyed activities like sand sledding and zip lining and delivered lessons on issues like desertification.  Shapotou gave us a preview of the majestic sand dunes that we would experience more intimately in the coming days.  But before our desert trek, we went to a village about an hour from Zhongwei.  During the ride over, we passed through a sea of gaunt mountains stretched to each horizon, forming an otherworldly landscape.  Once we arrived at the village, we hung out at the bank of the yellow river before heading upwards to find resident to speak with.  The next day, it was time to begin our trek.  Our walk to the camp site was made difficult by the large jugs of water and other group supplies that our guides had us carry, but once we were there we were exposed fully to the wonders of sand, walking barefoot among the dunes.  At night, we played cards with our guides and others on the trek.  In the morning, we packed up and returned to Zhongwei, where we prepared for an evening train to Beijing.  Upon waking up in Beijing we immediately headed to the international school Keystone Academy.  Getting there was a quite a journey, but the beautiful, three-year-old campus made us quickly forget our fatigue.  On our second day in the city we split up, doing various individual activities, although we regrouped for a Peking Duck dinner, one of Beijing's specialties.  Now, so far all of our activities had been in China.  None of us ever expected that we would be venturing onto US soil before May 1.  But on the final day of X-phase, we visited the US embassy in Beijing, gaining insight into how recent political changes in Washington have affected people on the ground.  It will not be long now before we actually step onto US soil--see you soon!

Serene: it was fun.

Jack: it was fun.

Jacob: no terrain can compete with that of a real desert.

Phil: 不错。

Paul: 六。(uh sah)

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SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

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X-Phase Recap

The Five Dragons,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

We are now reflecting on the past 80-odd days within the shadow of the Great Wall.  During our final X-phase that ended at the Lama Temple in Beijing, we started by, (as planned) taking a pair of trains to get to Zhongwei.  On our first day in the city, we visited the Gao temple, exploring […]

Posted On

04/29/17

Author

The Five Dragons

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    [post_content] => Dear Spring 2017 China Semester Students & Families,

It is hard to believe that 3 months have passed since embarking on this incredible adventure! It won’t be long and students will be boarding their planes back home. We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival!

Below is a reminder of the return group flight information for eagerly awaiting families (all times are in local time zones):

Monday, May 1st

Cathay Pacific Pacific #0898

Depart: Hong Kong (HKG) 9:25 am

Arrive: Los Angeles (LAX) 7:40 am

We will have a Dragons Administrator on call for the duration of the travel day. Should you need any assistance after regular office hours, please call our “on-call” number at 303-921-6078. We wish all students a great trip home! Sincerely, Boulder Admin [post_title] => Return Flight Information [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => return-flight-information-56 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-26 10:02:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-26 16:02:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 599 [name] => SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS [slug] => china-semester-spring-2017 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 599 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 595 [count] => 75 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 0.1 [cat_ID] => 599 [category_count] => 75 [category_description] => [cat_name] => SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS [category_nicename] => china-semester-spring-2017 [category_parent] => 595 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2017/china-semester-spring-2017/ ) ) [category_links] => SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS )

SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

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Return Flight Information

Hilary LeBlanc,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

Dear Spring 2017 China Semester Students & Families, It is hard to believe that 3 months have passed since embarking on this incredible adventure! It won’t be long and students will be boarding their planes back home. We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival! Below is a reminder of the return group flight information […]

Posted On

04/26/17

Author

Hilary LeBlanc

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    [post_content] => Crossing the border and entering into Inner Mongolia, we have ventured into the desert and spent a night on the sand.  The sand dunes have proven as fun to walk on as they are beautiful to look at--burrowing my feet into the soft earth, I can find a refreshing escape from the daytime heat or the cold of the night.  Like water, the desert's sea of sand is suited for swimming, though drying off can be a slow process.
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Desert Trek

Jacob Waldor,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

Crossing the border and entering into Inner Mongolia, we have ventured into the desert and spent a night on the sand.  The sand dunes have proven as fun to walk on as they are beautiful to look at–burrowing my feet into the soft earth, I can find a refreshing escape from the daytime heat or […]

Posted On

04/24/17

Author

Jacob Waldor

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    [post_content] => Has been great! So great that students are fully engrossed in their days, and not fulfilling their duties to the Yak Board. Here are your friendly instructors again, filling in with photos from the past few days.

Our first evening in the oasis city of Zhongwei was spent getting acquainted to the lovely hostel North by Northwest, and its super-sized poker cards. The next day we spent in the city, playing dice after lunch, and visiting the Gao ('High') Temple, a place of worship that combines Buddhism with Taoist and Confucian philosophies, and features a visual representation of Hell fashioned out of a former bomb shelter. The day after we were at Shapotou, a scenic area by the Yellow River. We heard a lesson from each student, covering the topics of desert geography, desertification, local ecology, Yellow River culture, and an introduction to Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region. Students are doing really well embracing a traveler's ethos for their expedition, with clear learning objectives, and eschewing the choice of being tourists on camels. (Jacob still looked at the camels lovingly for a long time.)

More to come!
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The Final Expedition So Far

Instructors,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

Has been great! So great that students are fully engrossed in their days, and not fulfilling their duties to the Yak Board. Here are your friendly instructors again, filling in with photos from the past few days. Our first evening in the oasis city of Zhongwei was spent getting acquainted to the lovely hostel North […]

Posted On

04/24/17

Author

Instructors

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    [post_date] => 2017-04-19 09:48:37
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    [post_content] => What started out as a medium to expand my vocabulary ended up being a new found passion for the calligraphy itself.

I went in with the mentality of learning more about character structure/makeup and the meaning behind characters as a way to expand my vocabulary, a central goal of mine for this semester. In hindsight it seems quite foolish that I intended to use another focus of inquiry as a medium to accomplish that goal instead of choosing an ISP topic that focused on vocabulary directly. Fortunately for me, I fell in love with the calligraphy anyways.

The learning curve was extremely exponential. I had 6 hour and a half lessons, so 9 hours in total. After three classes of focusing on writing one phrase per class with little progress to show for it, I had becoming increasingly discouraged and frustrated. I never had a natural affinity to drawing and was worried my lack of artistic ability was showing. However, I came prepared for the 4th class. I had gotten ready ahead of time and started practicing before my teacher arrived, so I was warmed up and prepared for when class started. That class, I started working on a poem written called “春晓” by 孟浩然. After writing the first character, 春, I was both excited and relieved to see that it looked relatively even and symmetrical. In my excitement, I looked over to my teacher and said, "pretty good right?!" She replied, "very good!" Of course, the exchange was in Chinese though.

From then on I had a new found confidence in my calligraphy skills. More importantly I had become excited for the calligraphy classes, whereas for the first few classes I was anxious I would not do well. After some great practice during classes 4-6, I was ready to start working on my final version of the entire poem at the end of my final class.

The poem has 20 characters in total, 22 including the title and 26 including my signature. It took me around an hour and 15 minutes to write the entire poem. For the first half I went at my own pace, so extremely slow. Subsequently, the first half had some of the best characters I have ever written. At about the midway point I realized I was running out of time, so the second half was slightly rushed. Regardless, I was extremely proud of the final product. It was something that I was happy to hang up in the program house for other group members and party-goers to see!

Now having been on the road for two and a half weeks, my calligraphy ISP made me become more aware of any calligraphy in my surroundings. During my 6 classes of calligraphy I learned not only about how to properly write the characters but also about different styles of calligraphy and how the way characters are written can express deeper meanings. For example, when writing the character for moon, 月, the thickness of the character can symbolize whether the moon is a full moon or a crescent moon. Thus, whenever I see calligraphy I try to analyze the style and any meaning I can find behind the characters I understand.

While we were in Chengdu, we had some time to explore an old town street called Jinli, 锦里. I was intrigued by one of the local shops that sold specialized fans with calligraphy written on one side with a painted designed on the other side. The calligraphy expert at the shop would take someone's name and on the spot write out a four line poem with 5 characters per line. The first three lines started with a character from their name. This sparked my interest in the connection between Chinese poetry and calligraphy, where the characters of the poem can collectively have meaning and the calligraphy style and form they are written in can add another deeper layer of meaning. With this understanding, I think I can take my calligraphy to the next level. The only trouble is, writing poetry is hard enough in English, let alone Chinese.

Fortunately for me, the stars aligned and the continuation of this train of thought was meant to be. After leaving Chengdu, we left for Emei Shan, where we stayed in a cottage, owned by a friendly couple, for 4 days. The husband just happened to be a Chinese literature major, and was very familiar with Chinese poetry. I showed him my final calligraphy project and he was very impressed! We had some great discussion about Chinese poetry on poems written by 孟浩然 and poems he wrote himself. I gained a much better understanding of poem structure, ancient history references, and artistic styles used in poems.

If I ever decide to write Chinese poetry myself I feel much more prepared, however I would still need a significant amount of research and time to do it! When I get back home, I will continue practicing calligraphy and I already have some projects planned out. Very excited to start once I get back!
    [post_title] => Calligraphy ISP Reflection
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Calligraphy ISP Reflection

Philip Milana,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

What started out as a medium to expand my vocabulary ended up being a new found passion for the calligraphy itself. I went in with the mentality of learning more about character structure/makeup and the meaning behind characters as a way to expand my vocabulary, a central goal of mine for this semester. In hindsight […]

Posted On

04/19/17

Author

Philip Milana

WP_Post Object
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    [post_date] => 2017-04-19 09:44:47
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    [post_content] => The official X-phase has finally begun, and we are heading North to the Hui minority autonomous region in Ningxia.  Our journey to Zhongwei involves a 20 hour sleeper train to Lanzhou followed by a 6 hour hard seater that will take us to our final destination.  There, we will spend at least one night out in the desert, reaching our camping spot with the help of a camel.  Much is still flexible within our plan, though, but we will be sure to learn about the growing ecological problem of desertification, the history and culture of the Hui people, the geology of the region, local village life, and desert agriculture.  Our study of desertification may involve visiting a research center, where there is also an amusement park that has river rafting and sand sledding, and talking to locals.  Speaking with locals will be integral to our experience because they can point us to activities off the beaten path by telling us where we can find remote villages and relating the effect of development on their lives.  After five nights in Ningxia we will take an overnight train to Beijing.  In Beijing we will visit Keystone Academy, an international school, engage in individual activities, and hopefully have the opportunity to speak with government officials.  On the 27th at 5pm, our X-phase will come to an end, and it will be up to our three instructors to bring the program to a close.
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SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

View post

X-Phase, for real now

五Dragons,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

The official X-phase has finally begun, and we are heading North to the Hui minority autonomous region in Ningxia.  Our journey to Zhongwei involves a 20 hour sleeper train to Lanzhou followed by a 6 hour hard seater that will take us to our final destination.  There, we will spend at least one night out […]

Posted On

04/19/17

Author

五Dragons

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    [post_date] => 2017-04-19 00:37:01
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-19 06:37:01
    [post_content] => Following the end of our urban expedition in Chongqing and Chengdu, we headed south to Emeishan (Emei Mountains), a 2-hour high speed train ride away from Chengdu. Emeishan is a prominent site for Chinese Buddhism, with which we engaged during the day on April 17. On the 13th, upon arrival at Qinghe Guesthouse, we spent the afternoon chatting about takeaways from the urban expedition, and the evening setting goals for planning the Final Expedition. For the next three days students worked hard to clarify learning goals, and come up with an itinerary and budget for their Final Expedition.

We visited the Golden Summit monastery and returned to Chengdu yesterday, and are now on an overnight sleeper train to mark the start of the Final Expedition (April 18)! Expedition itinerary from students to come soon. In the meantime, we hope you enjoy photos from the past few days in the Emei area.
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View post

Emei Retreat

Instructors,SPRING: CHINA: SOUTH OF THE CLOUDS

Description

Following the end of our urban expedition in Chongqing and Chengdu, we headed south to Emeishan (Emei Mountains), a 2-hour high speed train ride away from Chengdu. Emeishan is a prominent site for Chinese Buddhism, with which we engaged during the day on April 17. On the 13th, upon arrival at Qinghe Guesthouse, we spent […]

Posted On

04/19/17

Author

Instructors

1 2 3 8