Photo of the Week
SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
Photo Title


WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 132907
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-06-26 12:07:42
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-26 18:07:42
    [post_content] => 

Dear Andes & Amazon Students and Parents:

 

We would like to call your attention to the rabies pre-exposure inoculation. Please reference page 37 of the Andes & Amazon Course Preparation Manual for the following response:

 

Q: Should we get the pre-exposure for rabies?

A: We strongly recommend it for this course, but please consult with a professional physician first. Rabies is a uniformly fatal disease transmitted by the bite of a rabid animal. In the developing world, dogs are the most common carriers of rabies. Rabies pre-exposure vaccine exists and is effective, but even with these vaccines, exposure to rabies requires follow-up therapy. The pre-exposure vaccination does not eliminate the need for additional therapy after a rabies exposure; however, it simplifies therapy by eliminating the need for human rabies immune globulin (HRIG). HRIG, suggested by the Center for Disease Control as part of the post-exposure treatment, is NOT AVAILABLE in many developing countries, and families who wish to treat potential exposure with HRIG may have to evacuate to a country where HRIG is available. Students who have been inoculated with pre-exposure vaccine will most likely not need to evacuate the country if bitten. Students who have not been inoculated with the pre-exposure vaccine and who require evacuation will incur evacuation costs not covered by Dragons. Please note: Rabies pre-exposure vaccine involves a series of shots which need to be started at least a month before departure. Please make sure to plan accordingly.

 

Our experiences in Latin America have shown that dogs are a prevalent risk that we actively mitigate through training and other proactive measures. However, we have also learned that in the case of a dog bite, HRIG is not readily available in most Latin American countries. Therefore, depending on the circumstances of the bite, students without the rabies pre-exposure inoculations would likely need to be evacuated to the US where HRIG is available.

 

While Dragons cannot formally recommend any inoculation, we want to clearly communicate the benefits of the pre-exposure vaccine, available through any travel clinic and through most family physicians, since in the rare event of an animal bite it may allow a student to remain in-country without program disruption and additional expense.

Sincerely, Dragons Administration

Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

[post_title] => Important information regarding the rabies inoculation [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => important-information-regarding-the-rabies-inoculation [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-06-26 12:07:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-06-26 18:07:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 526 [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 526 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 512 [count] => 56 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 2.1 [cat_ID] => 526 [category_count] => 56 [category_description] => [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016 [category_parent] => 512 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/ ) ) [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited )

SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

View post

Important information regarding the rabies inoculation

Julianne Chandler,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

Dear Andes & Amazon Students and Parents:   We would like to call your attention to the rabies pre-exposure inoculation. Please reference page 37 of the Andes & Amazon Course Preparation Manual for the following response:   Q: Should we get the pre-exposure for rabies? A: We strongly recommend it for this course, but please consult with a professional physician first. Rabies is […]

Posted On

06/26/16

Author

Julianne Chandler

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 132905
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-06-26 12:07:06
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-26 18:07:06
    [post_content] => 

Hello upcoming Amazon travelers!

As you are all likely beginning to visit travel doctors and make a plan for vaccinations and medication, we wanted to take this opportunity to provide some additional information, especially with regards to malaria prophylaxis.

Dragons has no specific stipulations or requirements regarding malaria and you should know that it is up to your discretion. We hope the following information from us can supplement info you’ve already received.

As a caveat, and in line with all of our literature, please consult your travel doctor for ALL medical recommendations. We do our best to provide clear information, but also recognize that we at Dragons are not medical professionals and cannot give specific medical advice. This is to be worked out with your doctor, but we encourage you to come to them with questions because it is not uncommon for many doctors to offer blanket-prescriptions while not considering the specific details of their client’s travels.

Also note that many malaria prophylactics have side effects that should be considered and tested before committing to 11 weeks of travel in a foreign country. In addition, it is important to note that medications for malaria do not prevent you from contracting the disease, but they do lessen the associated symptoms.

An important way we can help in your decision with your travel doctor is to give you a very clear breakdown of the regions and altitudes where you will travel, which are the two determining factors in coming up with a plan for malaria prophylaxis.  Ultimately, we are in full support of whatever regimen your travel doctor has prescribed.

 

THE CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL REFERENCES The CDC website for Bolivia (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/bolivia.aspx) states the following: “Areas of Bolivia with Malaria: All areas <2,500 m (<8,202 ft) in the following departments: Beni, Chuquisaca, Cochabamba, La Paz, Pando, Santa Cruz, and Tarija. None in city of La Paz.”

 

And for Peru the following “Areas of Peru with Malaria: All departments <2000 m (6,561 ft) except none in Arequipa, Moquegua, Puno, and Tacna. Present in Puerto Maldonado. No malaria in highland tourist areas (Cuzco, Machu Picchu, and Lake Titicaca).”

 

OUR ITINERARIES

Your semester will begin either in the La Paz or Cochabamba departments of Bolivia at altitudes between 2600 and 5000 meters above sea level, or in the Cusco department of Peru at altitudes above 2800. Your travels will then take you to various parts of the mountains in the La Paz department or to Peru in the Cuzco and Madre de Dios Departments at similar altitudes (over 2600 meters). Your group will descend to the Amazon Basin no sooner than the end of March and until that time will be at altitudes higher than 2600 meters. Once you have descended to the Amazon lowlands students should expect to spend a maximum of two weeks at altitudes between 400 and 1600 meters (either in the La Paz, Cochabamba and/or Beni Departments of Bolivia or in the Madre de Dios and Cuzco departments of Peru).

 

PLAN While we cannot give specific medical advice, note that the CDC does say the cities of Cochabamba, La Paz, Sorata, Cuzco, and other areas we will travel in the first 6 weeks are at altitudes that are above malarial risk areas.

Additionally, we can plan for the specific day that you drop into the Amazon lowlands and can advise each of you in advance to begin your medications (no sooner than the end of March). In turn, when you come back up to the mountains, the divide is very clear as well and we can come up with a plan for finishing the prescription.

Our total time in malarial risk zones, according to the CDC, will be no more than 2 weeks.

Please talk to your travel doctor about this, bringing a print-up of this note as well as the sample itinerary offered on our website and in our catalog and see what they recommend. We will work with whatever recommendations your doctor makes.

 

VISAS AND MOSQUITOES It is imperative that you obtain an ORIGINAL COPY of your Yellow Fever Vaccination Card (the yellow paper that many people just staple to their passport) for entry to Bolivia.  This will also be needed to extend your tourist visa after arrival.

 

We hope this helps, and please send us an e-mail or give us a call if you have any questions. We hope your preparation for the Spring semester is going well!

 

Best,

Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Julianne Chandler and Dragons’ Admin

[post_title] => Important! Information about malaria in the Amazon [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => important-information-about-malaria-in-the-amazon-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-06-26 12:07:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-06-26 18:07:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 526 [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 526 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 512 [count] => 56 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 2.1 [cat_ID] => 526 [category_count] => 56 [category_description] => [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016 [category_parent] => 512 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/ ) ) [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited )

SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

View post

Important! Information about malaria in the Amazon

Julianne Chandler,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

Hello upcoming Amazon travelers! As you are all likely beginning to visit travel doctors and make a plan for vaccinations and medication, we wanted to take this opportunity to provide some additional information, especially with regards to malaria prophylaxis. Dragons has no specific stipulations or requirements regarding malaria and you should know that it is […]

Posted On

06/26/16

Author

Julianne Chandler

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 142029
    [post_author] => 25
    [post_date] => 2016-05-01 13:14:27
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-05-01 19:14:27
    [post_content] => Welcome home Andes & Amazon Accredited semester students! The group flight just touched down in Miami. A big thanks for a wonderful semester.

All the best,

The Boulder Admin Team
    [post_title] => On The Ground In Miami!
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => on-the-ground-in-miami
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-05-01 13:14:27
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-05-01 19:14:27
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 526
                    [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 526
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 512
                    [count] => 56
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 2.1
                    [cat_ID] => 526
                    [category_count] => 56
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [category_parent] => 512
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
)

SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

View post

On The Ground In Miami!

Admissions2,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

Welcome home Andes & Amazon Accredited semester students! The group flight just touched down in Miami. A big thanks for a wonderful semester. All the best, The Boulder Admin Team

Posted On

05/1/16

Author

Admissions2

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 142017
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-05-01 06:07:25
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-05-01 12:07:25
    [post_content] => And they're off! Sleepy and ready-eyed, we parted ways before the sun rose this morning in La Paz.

Some students are headed hometown the US and others are continuing their travels in Argentina, Colombia, Nicaragua and beyond!

Thank you, friends, family and loved ones for sharing these students with us these past few months. It's been a real adventure!

With love,

Elena & Chris
    [post_title] => And they're off!
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => and-theyre-off-5
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-05-01 06:15:10
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-05-01 12:15:10
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 526
                    [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 526
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 512
                    [count] => 56
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 2.1
                    [cat_ID] => 526
                    [category_count] => 56
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [category_parent] => 512
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
)
View post

And they’re off!

Instructors,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

And they’re off! Sleepy and ready-eyed, we parted ways before the sun rose this morning in La Paz. Some students are headed hometown the US and others are continuing their travels in Argentina, Colombia, Nicaragua and beyond! Thank you, friends, family and loved ones for sharing these students with us these past few months. It’s […]

Posted On

05/1/16

Author

Instructors

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 141960
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-04-29 20:10:56
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-30 02:10:56
    [post_content] => My time in Bolivia has been saturated in conversations about the first indigenous president of Bolivia, Evo Morales. Evo's rise to power was directly correlated to his involvement in the Water Wars and without this leadership in a time of crisis, he would not have the support he needed for his election campaign. His methods of intervention and proposed change in the governments were grassroots protests and blockades. we see these tactics being used now by Evos indigenous campisinons, and yet Evo is not responding in a way that he once asked the government to respond to his methods. This brought up the question, even though Evo was mainly elected by his indigenous supporters, does he still maintain that support in his third term and if not, why?

 

We spent a majority of regional seminar exploring the politics of Bolivia and it is hard not to look at Evos political reign in Bolivia when speaking about modern day Bolivian politics. He has been a revolutionary leader not only for Bolivia's indigenous communities but also for Bolivia as a whole! His first political term was marked by indigenous rights activism and programs that changed the direction of Bolivian politics to a government of and for the people instead a of the decades of corruption and colonial power that had proceeded it. These changes brought hope to indigenous people within Bolivia, which accounts for over half the population.

 

Evo was elected for a second term with an overwhelming majority, but during the end of his second and the beginning of his third term, things changed. Evo started crumpling under the pressure of international corporations and corruption slowly dug it's way into Evo presidency. The marginalized populations in Bolivia have always held Evo up on a pedestal and many of his supporters choose to only look at the good things Evo has done during his presidency. This mentality has continued despite several corruption and familial scandals but I have seen Evos support dwindle as the people of Bolivia have woken up to the corruption that has plagued Evos presidency. This mentality become evident when Bolivia voted no on the referendum for Evos fourth term.

 

I found myself in Plaza Principal on the first full weekend in Cochabamba and it just so happened that Evo was giving a speech about Bolivian campisinons right to grow coca. I found Evo to be inspiring and saw how his still inspires many of his people's support. After this event, I took it upon myself to always ask people what their thoughts were about Evo and how he was running the country, and everyone I asked said that he did a lot of good in the beginning of his presidency but they see that he has become corrupt and they no longer want him in power. As the semester went on, and I learned the extent of corruption and neglect that Evo was entangled in, I better understood the opinions of the Bolivians I had spoke with. Evo was the future of Bolivia, but Bolivia needs a new leader who will prioritize investment in sustainable development and empower it's people to look forward to a brighter future!
    [post_title] => The Future of Bolivia- Is Evo still the answer?
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => the-future-of-bolivia-is-evo-still-the-answer
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-04-29 20:10:56
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-30 02:10:56
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 526
                    [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 526
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 512
                    [count] => 56
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 2.1
                    [cat_ID] => 526
                    [category_count] => 56
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [category_parent] => 512
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
)
View post

The Future of Bolivia- Is Evo still the answer?

Kayla Scott,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

My time in Bolivia has been saturated in conversations about the first indigenous president of Bolivia, Evo Morales. Evo’s rise to power was directly correlated to his involvement in the Water Wars and without this leadership in a time of crisis, he would not have the support he needed for his election campaign. His methods […]

Posted On

04/29/16

Author

Kayla Scott

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 141653
    [post_author] => 20
    [post_date] => 2016-04-21 16:18:37
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-21 22:18:37
    [post_content] => Dear Andes & Amazon Accredited Students & Families,

It is hard to believe that 3 months have passed since embarking on this incredible adventure! It won’t be long and students will be boarding their planes back home. We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival!

Below is a reminder of the return group flight information for eagerly awaiting families:

May 1st, 2016

LAN Airlines #2569

Depart: La Paz, Bolivia 6:20 am

Arrive: Lima, Peru 7:15 am

May 1st, 2016

LAN Airlines #2510

Depart: Lima, Peru 8:25 am

Arrive: Miami, FL 3:15 pm

We will have a Dragons Administrator on call for the duration of the travel day.   Starting on Saturday, April 30th, should you need any assistance after regular office hours, please call our “on-call” number at 303-921-6078.

We wish all students a great trip home!

Sincerely,

Boulder Admin
    [post_title] => Return Flight Information
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => return-flight-information-36
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-04-21 16:18:37
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-21 22:18:37
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 526
                    [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 526
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 512
                    [count] => 56
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 2.1
                    [cat_ID] => 526
                    [category_count] => 56
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [category_parent] => 512
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
)

SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

View post

Return Flight Information

Anne Koenning,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

Dear Andes & Amazon Accredited Students & Families, It is hard to believe that 3 months have passed since embarking on this incredible adventure! It won’t be long and students will be boarding their planes back home. We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival! Below is a reminder of the return group flight […]

Posted On

04/21/16

Author

Anne Koenning

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 140674
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-04-14 19:51:54
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-04-15 01:51:54
    [post_content] => Woohoo! We made it to the fully independant study phase of the trip, and the days now seem too short.

I have settled into a lovely little hostel in the center of Cochabamba, on a street lined with internet cafes and architecture/deisgn businesses, and am ready to get after my street art project in earnest. Yesterday I learned how to mix colors inside spraypaint cans, a technique I never would have considered without it being taught to me, likely. I have gotten access to a great shared space for practicing art called El Martadero, where my mentor Puriskiri has a classroom dedicated to the use of and practice with spraypaint. Later today I will spend a couple of hours with Kayla and her mentor Mario learning techniques for drawing and painting human forms, as many of the ideas that I am having for politically charged murals are pretty anthropocentric (but I generally can't draw human form worth a dang).

Sunday was one of four Dias de Peaton in Cochabamba, when, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., rather than driving, everyone walks, bikes, or employs some other form of generally not fossil-fueled transportation. I would be incredibly excited to see this tradition observed in more places in the U.S., other than just bike-to-work day; in fact, most businesses were closed in observance of this holiday, and the streets were filled, especially El Prado, with vendors, activities, and revelers. I saw some pacay fruits that were longer than my entire arm!

Since restoring the availability of data on my phone, I have noticed a serious recurring temptation to simply check out from the phenomenal world around me via Instagram and other social medias and networks; however, something I notice now after spending so much time without regular access to these things, is the empty feeling I am left with after spending half an hour staring at the tiny little screen that lives in my pocket. While it certainly provides an great utility in connecting me to my ISP mentors, program guides, and my friends, it can easily provide an escape route that whisks me away from the amazing city in which I have the privilege of living for the next 11 days.

Anyways, I think I'll have more chances to recount more of the excitement the is sure to present itself in the coming days, along with updates on my final projects to which I will be devoting much of my time here.

chau chau for now,

N
    [post_title] => City Sights
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => city-sights
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-04-14 19:51:54
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-15 01:51:54
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 526
                    [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 526
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 512
                    [count] => 56
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 2.1
                    [cat_ID] => 526
                    [category_count] => 56
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [category_parent] => 512
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
)

SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

View post

City Sights

Nathaniel Young,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

Woohoo! We made it to the fully independant study phase of the trip, and the days now seem too short. I have settled into a lovely little hostel in the center of Cochabamba, on a street lined with internet cafes and architecture/deisgn businesses, and am ready to get after my street art project in earnest. […]

Posted On

04/14/16

Author

Nathaniel Young

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 139939
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-03-22 16:40:10
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-22 22:40:10
    [post_content] => 

            Huddled alongside the other men in our intrepid little group, across from the women, and listening somewhat distractedly to Favian’s hushed incantations and supplications, I had very little idea of what awaited us, and in particular myself, in the Peruvian highland Nation known as Q’eros. Though I felt that I was somewhat prepared by the texts that I had read over the previous days, written by two very different people at vastly different times though history, I was trying to hold myself to my set intention of “no expectations.” As I participated in my part of Favian’s ritual, I felt a budding sense of magic that I hoped would only continue to grow over the course of the next five days. I could not have predicted how that time ended up playing out.

            After spending a few hours in the narrow bed of the truck that transported us from Ocongate to the largest Q’eros village, known as Quico Grande, breathing slowly to avoid choking on the diesel fumes that crowded in with us under the leaky tarp which provided us with shelter from El Niño’s rains, the corrugated steel roofs and concrete bridge of the town were as welcoming a sight as I could imagine. Because the families with whom we would be staying were still out in the mist-veiled mountains, tending to their llamas and alpacas and potatoes, we Dragons trouped into Favian’s kitchen and drank mint tea to warm ourselves. While the estate belonging to Favian was built from concrete, most of the other houses we saw were constructed of irregular stones mortared with clay and grasses; some were roofed in the traditional style with thatch, but most were covered with the more recently available corrugated steel. Favian explained that since Quico Grande had access to a road, where the other Q’eros villages did not, residents of the larger and higher town enjoyed a wider variety of building materials, notably cement, steel, and plastic.

            A few hours of waiting and resting passed, and the families who had volunteered to open their homes to us began to return form their day’s work. Most of the group members were paired off for the night’s home-stay, while Jack chanced it on his own. Grant and I were adopted, as it were, by a man named Julian (I was fairly surprised to find that many of the Q’eros natives had Castellan names, rather than Quechua names), and he led us to his house, which was a mere 30 paces or so from Favian’s storage room where our backpacks had been stowed.

            A dimly lit, single room cottage with a traditional thatched roof, Julian’s abode smelled of campfire and a familiar yet un-nameable scent that reminded me of the Northern First Nation sweat lodges, which I found immediately comforting. Having been graciously provided with some fleece pelts to sit on, Grant and I spent the next several hours in a shared sense of un-belonging. Unable to communicate efficiently, we frequently spurred burst of laughter from our host’s family, which only compounded my mental discomfort; though I later learned that it is common for the the people of this Place to laugh at each other, and not just us gringos.

            While I was trying to keep my expectations minimal, I found that my initial senses of magic and wonder were turning to those of shame and discomfort; while I knew full well that we were outsiders, I had been hoping to experience genuine warmth and a sense of connection, rather than this feeling that somehow we were providing first a source of entertainment due to our communication roadblocks, and later a sense of commerce when, the next morning, Julian displayed an array of trinkets which he wanted us to buy. Though the beaded bracelets, skillfully crafted by Julian or his family did indeed catch my eye, and I may have purchased one in a different circumstance, I felt obligated to buy one due to the presentation rather than a genuine desire. Thus began my sense of disillusionment: where I had hoped to learn more about those that I perceived to be a people with a very special and alive connection to their magical Place among the jagged Andes peaks, all I had observed to this point was a reserved air and a desire for wealth.

            My experience of Quico Chico, situated one or perhaps two miles down the valley, and completely inaccessible by road, was, barring one small misunderstanding, quite pleasantly different. Grant and I once again found ourselves under the same roof, this time with a a kindly older man by the name of Martín, and his wife, whose name was in Quechua and which I have regretfully forgotten. Their one-room cottage was nearly a quarter of the size of that in which we stayed in Quico Grande, but in my opinion this engendered a sense of familial intimacy that was lacking in the larger house, full though it was with some six to eight other people besides Julian and ourselves.

            Our time in Quico Chico was centered around an event which happened on our third day in Q’eros (our second day in Quico Chico), known as the Pachamanqa, which from Quechua to English roughly translates as “Offering to Mother Earth.” The Pachamanqa consisted of two primary events: the first being a ritual slaughter of two adult sheep, during which they are exsanguinated, skinned, and reduced into their singular parts for cooking while simultaneously, by other villagers, a small, hollow, stone shrine is constructed around and over a fire pit containing wood to burn; once the stones are hot, the structure is partially collapsed, and the meat from the sacrifice is placed in and among the rocks, and the remainder of the rocks are used to cover the meat so that it will cook. The rocks are then covered with soaked, woven plastic (which I was unhappy to see), then soaked grasses, then another sheet of plastic, then buried under earth and soil. This fashioned earth oven thoroughly cooked all the meat from both animals in under three hours. The second main event of the Pachamanqa is a gathering of all the villagers who wish to (and are able to) attend; Favian said words of gratitude to Tayta Inti or Padre Sol (both meaning Father Sun), Pachamama (Mother Earth), Madre Luna (Mother Moon), and Las Estrellas (the Stars, the children of the Sun and Moon), and after, a great feast was set to by all in attendance. The meat was delicious, and was accompanied by new potatoes from Favian’s own field. During the entirety of both events, the nearly ever-present rains subsided, an indication to me that Pachamama and her sons, the Apus (meaning Lords in Quechua) that are the mountains in this part of the world, might have been listening to our supplications and watching us throughout.

            After the Pachamanqa, the rain returned once more. I found that as the day went on, the impression made upon me by the events that transpired only deepened. This might have been the magic I sought. This had not only been my first time personally witnessing a slaughter of any kind, it was also my first true look in Q’eros of how the people relate to the land, and therefore their livelihood. There, in everyone I saw, was a certain matter-of-factness that I observed to be simultaneously authentic and unquestioning. Quite likely very few of the people of Q’eros, whether they had gathered for the ceremony or not, gave much thought to a different way of life; except for an odd few, those who are born in Q’eros live their whole lives in Q’eros and will die in Q’eros. The simplicity of this magic took me quite by surprise. The excerpts I had read prior to this experience spoke of a connection between the Quechua people and their entire surrounding area: in particular the mountains, but also the hills, rocks, passes, and rivers all have names and personalities that can and should be supplicated to, even at times needing placation in order to break a storm, a drought, a blight, or to cure a sick animal or person.

            Other than the Pachamanqa, however, the most I saw of any semblance of connection to Place was when a Q’eros individual would chew the sacred coca leaf. Even this blowing upon of the leaves after a quick mention of the nearest and largest Apu seemed perfunctory at best (much to my disappointment). Of the two texts that I read, the latter, written by Catherine J. Allen, was more concerned with the current nature of the Quechua people who still live in the more native fashion in the Andean highlands. The former was a dry, dusty account, written by Garcilaso de la Vega, also known as El Inca due to his mixed heritage (his father was a Spaniard who took an Inca noblewoman as his wife shortly after the fall of the Inka Dynasty), and who was raised in Cusco only a few years after the Inca’s subjugation by the Spanish. Garcilaso recounts the stories that were told to him by his Inka aunts and uncles, who were in fact delighted to share their version of how the Inka had originated, as this had never before been recorded in writing, and he says that the existence today of the Quechua and Aymara (as well as other, smaller, less well known groups of native peoples) is a testament to the Places in which many still reside today, a testament in particular to the fact the the Spaniards failed to conquer completely the harsh and unforgiving domain of the Inka in the High Andes, to which I now pay my respects with small offerings of coca.

            The latter account, written some time ago, though considerably more recently than Garcilaso’s accounts, and by a woman of North American or European heritage, engendered in me a much higher respect of the Apus, as well as their lesser cousins, the passes, the hills, the rocks and lakes throughout these lands. It is this writing that has caused me in this writing to inscribe Place with a capital “P;” the author wrote of how the people revere these Places and commune with them through prayers and by burning offerings, even though many Christian rituals have taken hold here. While I find great meaning in such practices, I did not myself observe this connection among the majority of people, except in the blowing upon of coca leaves with a muttered mention of only the largest landmarks, the Apus. Favian’s rituals and offerings were the only example I witnessed of the old ways, though in retrospect this could quite well have been due to my status as an outsider.

            To the Apus, Urpichay Sonqollay, gracias, thank you as well to the passes, hills, boulders, rivers and valleys for granting us passage through your sacred lands. I intend to bring the tradition of honoring the mountains back home with me, for my home is in the shadow of the great Rocky Mountains, whose old names I now long to know.

[post_title] => Memories of Q'eros [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => memories-of-qeros [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-03-22 16:40:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-03-22 22:40:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 526 [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 526 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 512 [count] => 56 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 2.1 [cat_ID] => 526 [category_count] => 56 [category_description] => [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016 [category_parent] => 512 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/ ) ) [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited )

SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

View post

Memories of Q’eros

Nathaniel Young,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

            Huddled alongside the other men in our intrepid little group, across from the women, and listening somewhat distractedly to Favian’s hushed incantations and supplications, I had very little idea of what awaited us, and in particular myself, in the Peruvian highland Nation known as Q’eros. Though I felt that I […]

Posted On

03/22/16

Author

Nathaniel Young

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 139940
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-03-22 16:25:54
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-22 22:25:54
    [post_content] => ¿Que tal compañeros?

Life is good. I am living with a great family in Tiquipaya, about 1.5 kilometers from our little Casita Dragones, and wow, are there a lot of animals here. Cows, guinea pigs, ducks, turkeys, dogs... Always an interesting sound or scent in the air.  I have gotten to know Doña Maxima pretty well, and her two adult children are quite interesting as well. Doña Maxima herself is a total bad-ass, who gets up every day at 5:00 in the morning to tend to her cows, the milk from which she sells to the national dairy company Píl. After that she sets the cows out to graze and tends to her garden and other animals. Usually she can be found in the fields near her house cutting alfalfa oldschool-style with a small sickle, which she uses masterfully. Her son Felix is an electrical engineer, and teaches at a university, and her daughter Lizzeth is studying to become a doctor. She works at a laboratory in a hospital.

Spanish classes at the program house are a definite challenge, but the more I talk in class and in the city, the more I learn! Speaking of the city, I am spending more and more time in the culturally rich city of Cochabamba. There is so much history here, it practically covers the walls in the form of murals. Entonces, I will be working with an established muralist for my ISP project, who goes by the name "Puriskiri," a Quechua word which translates to something like "walking back and forth a lot." He's got a great style, and while he mostly does graffiti (he only uses spray paint, even for his murals!), his murals have a strong political message to them, whether they speak to the issues present to this day in the mining communities, or are angled at the government both here in Bolivia and abroad. My favorite piece of his is a depiction of Donald Trump with a gun pointed at his face, accompanied by the words "¡por la boca, muere el cerdo!" It's a rather harsh commentary, but one that clearly and unapologetically states his point of view. I'm very excited to learn techniques from him so that I can convey my own messages (though they will likely be less graphic).

The time has been flying past, it's hard to believe that we've already been here for just over two weeks, and that we have just under two weeks left until the truly independant journey phase of the program, which I will most likely be spending in the city of Cochabamba proper. Hopefully soon I'll have some pictures to share, both of my daily life in Tiquipaya and of the artwork I am soon going to be producing.

Asi es todo por ahora, hasta pronto.

-N
    [post_title] => Cochabamba Calling
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => cochabamba-calling
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-03-22 16:25:54
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-03-22 22:25:54
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 526
                    [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 526
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 512
                    [count] => 56
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 2.1
                    [cat_ID] => 526
                    [category_count] => 56
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [category_parent] => 512
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
)

SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

View post

Cochabamba Calling

Nathaniel Young,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

¿Que tal compañeros? Life is good. I am living with a great family in Tiquipaya, about 1.5 kilometers from our little Casita Dragones, and wow, are there a lot of animals here. Cows, guinea pigs, ducks, turkeys, dogs… Always an interesting sound or scent in the air.  I have gotten to know Doña Maxima pretty […]

Posted On

03/22/16

Author

Nathaniel Young

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 139747
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-03-18 17:02:59
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-18 23:02:59
    [post_content] => Bolivia is home. These valleys, these mountains and their beautiful feminine qualities grace us with the opportunity to open our hearts. As I sit in the program house listening to my favorite song, watching the sun dance between the trees and Mikaela playing with our new adopted pup Sammy I can't help but feel magic. My Bolivian mama is the most incredible, beautiful, hard working, bad ass-feminist (just like my home mama) and I have a lot of gratitude for this home of independent women. I am eating incredible meals throughout the day, everyday!! All food from the garden, such a gift. I have a favorite street and cafe in Cochabamba!! As we are in the beginnings of our independent studies, I am in touch with and being exposed to the powerful Afro Bolivian community in Cochabamba and soon in my solo travels to the Yungas I will begin my storytelling/photography project. In hopes of creating the space for healing and illuminating the experience of those with Afro Roots. This of course plays in to my own discovering and relearning of my identity. A big journey, one of joy and sorrow. With that, here is to beginnings of an incredible journey with an incredible people.
    [post_title] => Bolivia is home.
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => bolivia-is-home
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-03-18 17:02:59
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-03-18 23:02:59
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/blog/
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 526
                    [name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [slug] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 526
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 512
                    [count] => 56
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 2.1
                    [cat_ID] => 526
                    [category_count] => 56
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
                    [category_nicename] => andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016
                    [category_parent] => 512
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2016/andes-amazon-accredited-spring-2016/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited
)

SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

View post

Bolivia is home.

Faridah Ndiaye,SPRING: Andes & Amazon Accredited

Description

Bolivia is home. These valleys, these mountains and their beautiful feminine qualities grace us with the opportunity to open our hearts. As I sit in the program house listening to my favorite song, watching the sun dance between the trees and Mikaela playing with our new adopted pup Sammy I can’t help but feel magic. […]

Posted On

03/18/16

Author

Faridah Ndiaye

1 2 3 6