Photo of the Week
Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014
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    [post_date] => 2014-05-09 22:06:41
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    [post_content] => Dear friends and family of the Indonesia Semester,

We have received word from the instructors that all students are in the air and on their way home. We wish them safe travels and warm re-connections with all of you back home. With care,

Dragons' Administration
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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

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Students in the air and on their way home

Dragons' Administration,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

Description

Dear friends and family of the Indonesia Semester, We have received word from the instructors that all students are in the air and on their way home. We wish them safe travels and warm re-connections with all of you back home. With care, Dragons’ Administration

Posted On

05/9/14

Author

Dragons' Administration

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    [post_date] => 2014-05-02 09:21:55
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-05-02 15:21:55
    [post_content] => On April 28th, 2014 I found myself in South Sulawesi, to be specific,
Toraja, looking at a very large number of water buffalo.

It’s funny because water buffalo kind of look like cows.
What’s even funnier is that I spent my eighth and tenth grade years at
a ranch in Utah raising calves and studying animal husbandry.
Honestly.

So, as I entered the Pasar Kerbau (buffalo market) the smell of poop
that just so happened to come from a one billion rupiah buffalo,
reminded me of something I hold so dear to my heart and a feeling of
joy erupted inside of me. With a new found confidence and remembrance
of my “cow-knowledge,” I walked through the Pasar Kerbau with the
ultimate grace. I danced between two bucking bulls. I ducked and
dodged a horn to the face. I leaped like a Sampelan sea-nymph over
buffalo pies. I stroked a baby buffalo’s ears with the tenderness of a
child reaching out to touch the hand of something precious.

In other words, it was incredible and I was in my element a little
bit. We learned that Torajan buffalos are the buffalos that have the
really rad markings and are considered to be the most valuable. They
are sometimes albino and have blue eyes and pink skin under their
coarse coat of black and white fur. The markings are super important
when it comes to price and one well built Torajan buffalo, like I
mentioned before with the whole poop thing, can go for one billion
rupiah. It’s pretty amazing how much Torajans save up to be able to
purchase one of these buffalos. On the other hand, some scrawny
non-Torajan buffalos can go for only five hundred thousand rupiah.
Well, that was the cheapest one we could find.

All in all, the Pasar Kerbau was an epic adventure with actually, a
bit of a competitive feel. Okay, so Ganda puts us all to the test with
a game he makes up. Ganda by the way is the main man who is in charge
of the homestays here in Toraja and is a fabulous resource to all of
us. Just in case all of the parentals who are reading this wanted to
know. The game consisted of us getting into groups of three or four
and trying to find out as much information about the buffalos, buffalo
prices, markings, and other various inquiries, as possible. At the end
of the buffalo market, after we had answered all of the questions on
the piece of paper Ganda had given us, we went to the food market and
had to purchase as many items as possible with twenty thousand rupiah.
That was a hell of a task if we are being frank here, but it was
awesome.

Finally, we arrived back home to our homestay village and had to relay
our information back to Ganda and the rest of the groups, with Ganda
judging who had the most knowledge as well as the most items purchased
at the food market. Leah had a pretty boss spiel about the buffalo
markings and her group gathered a total of four items, putting them in
first place and therefore winning the game. Well done, squires! The
other groups (including mine) failed to communicate on a couple
occasions and made some rookie mistakes, like purchasing a watermelon
for the entire twenty thousand or spreading out and spending more than
the given amount of rupiah.

Here are some quotes and remarks from the rest of the group:

Paige: "Gazing into the milky white, cloudy iris…The abyss stared back."
Liz: “Okay guys…Be careful. They will bite you….Like a horse.”
(Quoting Ganda before we entered the market.)
Zoe: “Wait you’re at the buffalo market…Without a guide!?” (Quoting
someone else’s guide when asked who we were with.)
Leah: "I thought it was a rock…It was buffalo poop. They should have a
sign. Wait where’s Paige? Oh, she’s over there taking a selfie with
that buffalo."
Taylor: "It was cool. Some were cute, some were not. It smelled like a
county fair and wearing flip flops was definitely a mistake."
Ian: "Born to die."
Rob: "It smells like poop."
Chris: "It was fun."
Alyssa: "It smells like home."
Lindsay: "I’m not going to follow the path Leah took between the butts
of two buffalo. If I do, they will break my legs."
Caleb: "I haven’t seen that many pounds of meat on the hoof since my
granddad took me to the Fortworth Rodeo in ’85. I need a hurt locker
trying to navigate this minefield."
Chrissy: "You know what would make it stop hissing? Just kill it." (On
large beetles, while trying to think of a quote relevant to the
buffalo market.) "I feel really bad for the albino buffalos because
they are getting sunburned. Also, they look like newborn baby hamsters."
(On the buffalo market.)
Rita: "Just wow, you have to come down here (to Toraja) to see for
yourself. I want to go back again."
    [post_title] => Pasar Bolu: An abundance of buffalo.
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Best Notes From The Field, Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

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Pasar Bolu: An abundance of buffalo.

Cat Simons,Best Notes From The Field, Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

Description

On April 28th, 2014 I found myself in South Sulawesi, to be specific, Toraja, looking at a very large number of water buffalo. It’s funny because water buffalo kind of look like cows. What’s even funnier is that I spent my eighth and tenth grade years at a ranch in Utah raising calves and studying […]

Posted On

05/2/14

Author

Cat Simons

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    [post_date] => 2014-04-16 22:18:07
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    [post_content] => Sporting a ludicrously large brown cowboy hat with the word COWBOY
plastered in white letters on the front, Ian’s grandfather looked out
of place with the rest of the sarong-wearing Indonesians in his
family. “Halo, nama saya Alyssa,” I introduced myself, stepping into
the one large room of the stilt house. Grandpa cracked a wide,
toothless smile and mumbled something in the Bajau language. Squatting
on the floor, several kids played with a baby python they had somehow
trapped in a plastic water bottle. Ian’s bapak, Lauda, appeared
carrying an armful of homemade spear guns and we all piled into the
wooden family boat.

We motored out to an unremarkable spot in the ocean, still in sight of
the floating village. Lauda dropped the makeshift coral anchor and
everyone jumped in the warm water. Within a few minutes, Grandpa
reappeared at the side of the boat casually carrying a pizza-sized sea
turtle in his hands. It flapped its fins crazily as we touched and
admired its shell. The fishermen gave me the baby spear gun, which,
despite its nickname, would prove to be an effective weapon. I swam
off in search of prey and noticed happily that Grandpa had taken me in
as his pupil for the day. He stayed close to me, occasionally pointing
out fish and patiently helping me reload my gun.  Soon after we
started the hunt, I made my first kill. Immediately,
Grandpa dove down to retrieve my spear and pulled the wriggling brown
fish off of the tip. To my surprise/horror he put the fish’s head
directly in his mouth and bit down hard to kill it while he used his
free hands to quickly reload the gun. After returning to the surface,
we exchanged wordless exclamations of delight.

After tossing the fish in the boat, Grandpa motioned for me to give
him the spear. I could hear only my own breathing in the snorkel tube
as I watched him expertly jab the rusty iron tip into a small hole in
the coral. Grinning bigger than ever, he swam upwards with a shiny
green lobster dangling from the spear. Throughout the next hour,
Grandpa took great delight in finding slimy things to make me shriek
into my snorkel. First he produced a striped sea snake, giggling while
swinging it in the air, followed by an octopus that wove its tentacles
up his arms and inked on us, and finally a massive rainbow-colored eel
that wriggled away with a spear wound through its tail. By the end of
the day, I had made 7 kills and a friendship with an ancient but
awesome Bajau man. When we clambered back into the boat, we were tired
and sunburnt and could not have been happier.
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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

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Fishing With Grandpa

Alyssa Mavor,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

Description

Sporting a ludicrously large brown cowboy hat with the word COWBOY plastered in white letters on the front, Ian’s grandfather looked out of place with the rest of the sarong-wearing Indonesians in his family. “Halo, nama saya Alyssa,” I introduced myself, stepping into the one large room of the stilt house. Grandpa cracked a wide, […]

Posted On

04/16/14

Author

Alyssa Mavor

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    [post_date] => 2014-04-16 13:35:00
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    [post_content] => The Pelni horn blares with all the force of some extra- terrestrial
call to awaken the dead. Sleeping families from all nooks and crannies
awake, gather their belongings, and slowly shuffle through the decks,
down the strangely rounded steps and out into the harbor of Bau Bau,
Sulawesi. Among the sea of faces are the fourteen of us, our life
jackets- strapped to the back of our packs- causing a cumulative
orange glow to surround us as we B-lined towards our hotel. As I think
back about the past weeks, my mind races with memories of
once-in-a-lifetime activities. Hunting cus cus, making bow and arrows,
living in the jungle, playing jacks with my home-stay brothers for
hours while we watch the monsoon pour water down around us; Each
activity adding unprecedented variety to the mix of, for lack of a
more eloquent phrase, the utter awesomeness that is the Dragon’s
Indonesia Semester. However, as we get ready to enter this next
section of the trip, the undercurrent of my mind is being swept a
long, not just by the prospect of doing more cool stuff but something
else entirely. One week ago, Caleb challenged each one of us to put
together a thirty minute summary of our life story. Thirty minutes
each night for one person to attempt to explain why they are they the
way that are.

Now, one of the most unique things about traveling with a program like
Dragons, in comparison to packing a bag and hitting the road is the
simple fact that you are traveling with a group. Getting to know each
other becomes as integral a part of the trip as buying a boat ticket
to the next location. But sharing who you are with a group of complete
strangers and explaining why you are that way are two completely
separate challenges.

Over the past several days I have mapped my way through nineteen years
of memories by journaling, talking with my peers, and by sharing the
stories of each other’s’ lives amidst the background of the vibrant,
bustling culture of the Pelni- the overnight boat that brought us to
Sulawesi. Although the task seems simple enough, it seems to be on
everyone’s mind even days after we began sharing. What to share? How
much to say? What are the ‘defining moments’? “Do I even have any?”.
It’s a bit like trying to explain your favorite book to a new friend;
You’ve read it a hundred times but still can’t quite seem to
communicate why it was so influential to you. So I wake up early, I
watch the school girls pass the hotel, adjusting their Jilbabs (head
scarves) and giggling like school girls do and I try to figure out how
explain my family, interests and personality traits to this amazing
group of friends who know who I am, but don’t quite know why. In the
background of this amazing journey, I find myself posed with a
question that I never thought of answering surrounded by an atmosphere
completely unfamiliar to me. By winding down this slightly absurd path
of self-inquiry while continuing to experience Indonesia I could not
be more grateful for this opportunity, these people, and whatever lies
ahead.
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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

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Looking Forward by Looking Back

Leah Whitehead ,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

Description

The Pelni horn blares with all the force of some extra- terrestrial call to awaken the dead. Sleeping families from all nooks and crannies awake, gather their belongings, and slowly shuffle through the decks, down the strangely rounded steps and out into the harbor of Bau Bau, Sulawesi. Among the sea of faces are the […]

Posted On

04/16/14

Author

Leah Whitehead

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    [post_date] => 2014-04-11 18:14:09
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-12 00:14:09
    [post_content] => Dear Parents and Friends,

We've emerged from the jungle at long last! We are now all back in Ambon, a beautiful city of green hills and blue bays on the very southwest corner of Maluku. Our stays in Sawai, Masihulan, and the place we lovingly call “Jungle Camp” were at turns dazzling, damp, beautiful, heartening, damp, fun, a little wet, exhilarating, and damp, but always eventful and full of learning. Please know that we are all in good health and looking ahead with a lot of anticipation to our imminent journey by ferry to the southeast tip of Sulawesi and the doorstep of the Bajau communities located there.

We should also probably say that while all of the above is completely true, one big detail we've left out is just how very much each of us stinks right now. I mean, it's bad. Even the legendary Ian Batts, who has on occasion managed to pull off wearing white knit shirts by Ralph Lauren with simply no problem at all in situations that would almost literally boggle your mind has been reduced to a backpack full of garments that have the kind of scent one imagines might be the reviled offspring off mildew and stomach acid. But please rest assured that laundry of proportions that Homer himself might be moved to write about is being done at this present moment, and that all manner of bathing, scrubbing, shaving, tweezing, and brushing (along with probably even more hygiene-related gerunds that I can't think of right now) is also being done, and that we all plan to return our pre-jungle well-manicured and floral scented selves in a relative jiffy...

...the above words got unfortunately lost in that classic void between intention and opportunity. It's been over a week now since they were clattered out, and we've since traveled a great deal.

We are now in the southeastern-most corner of the multi-appendaged island of Sulawesi. We came by way of the infamous Pelni line, Indonesia's state-owned passenger ship service, from Ambon to Bau Bau. Then we took a different, smaller passenger boat from Bau Bau to Kaledupa, then we took a wooden longboat from Kaledupa's port to the Bajau settlement of Sampela under the cover of night. The moon was a little smudge ringed by a faint halo, and the stilted homes came out of the darkness in an almost spectral way, and before you knew it we were all greeted and fed and staying in our current homestays.

Our time here in Sampela has been as spectacular as advertised. There's been lots of world-class snorkeling among the other-worldly reefs of Pulau Hoga, lots of spearfishing with Sampela's guru Louda, lots of net fishing with other homestay fathers and time spent taking in the way of life so unique to the Bajau of this settlement.

Our group is already pretty salty and sun-kissed through and through. The food provided by the family of our local contact, Andar, has been nothing short of amazing, and most nights we've been eating what we caught and/or speared earlier in the day, which is a lot of fun.
We hope to be in touch with more updates very soon!

Best from here,

Team Indo
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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

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Update from Sampela.

Instructor Team,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

Description

Dear Parents and Friends, We’ve emerged from the jungle at long last! We are now all back in Ambon, a beautiful city of green hills and blue bays on the very southwest corner of Maluku. Our stays in Sawai, Masihulan, and the place we lovingly call “Jungle Camp” were at turns dazzling, damp, beautiful, heartening, […]

Posted On

04/11/14

Author

Instructor Team

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    [post_date] => 2014-04-07 12:35:30
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-07 18:35:30
    [post_content] => Greetings everyone!

We're fully into the "sea" section of our trip, which means that after an eventful couple of weeks on Ambon and Seram in the jungle, we've now taken the infamous Pelni, Indonesia's very own line of huge passenger ships, all the way across the the Southeastern tip of Sulawesi and the port city of Bau Bau.  The journey here was such an experience, and we're happy to report that once you get far enough out the ocean is in fact very literally navy.  Almost so navy it's purple, in fact.

We're leaving here in just a matter of hours for an area called Kalidupa, and from there we're heading right to Sempela, a Bajau community where we'll be doing our next homestay.  This homestay in particular is like nothing else Dragons offers, and really like few experiences available in the world.  We're all excited to live among these 'people of the sea' and learn from their unique relationship with the ocean firsthand.

Connectivity has been dicey at best, but we will do what we can to be in touch as often as we can from in the coming days.

Best to you all,

Caleb, Chrissy, and Rita
    [post_title] => Checking in from Bau Bau.
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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

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Checking in from Bau Bau.

Team Indo,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

Description

Greetings everyone! We’re fully into the “sea” section of our trip, which means that after an eventful couple of weeks on Ambon and Seram in the jungle, we’ve now taken the infamous Pelni, Indonesia’s very own line of huge passenger ships, all the way across the the Southeastern tip of Sulawesi and the port city […]

Posted On

04/7/14

Author

Team Indo

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    [post_date] => 2014-04-06 07:28:37
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    [post_content] => I have a friend. This friend is not unwanted, however they do come as

surprise, always unexpected. We do not meet often but when we do it always when

they decide the time is right. We live close to each other; you could even say we

share a house more specifically a doorway. You must be wondering who my new

friend must be since we share so much but see each other so little. Well I will share

with the story of our first encounter and the beginning of our surprising friendship.

The air was cool and damp during the early hours of morning, 6 a.m. to be

exact. I had just woken up after a broken night of sleep, completely exhausted from

the previous nights activities. I had been dancing at a wedding reception for what

seemed like hours. Sleep still crusted in my eyes I made my way to the bathroom for

the usual morning activities. As I proceeded out of my bedroom doorway pulling

aside the embossed, lavender curtain I was suddenly felt something fly onto the top

of my head! Completely startled I acted out my, “What was that?! Get it off me”

dance until I was positive the creature had vacated my person. I quickly proceeded

to the bathroom without further investigation, as it was far too early and my

interest level was zero.

 

Later that day I returned home to relax and bond with my host family, but

first a quick afternoon nap. Upon waking up from my nap I exited my room and once

again was pounced upon by some flying insect. Highly curious this time, I watched

the flight path of the insect, after swatting it from my person once again, until it

landed on an adjacent wall. After the insect landed I hurried over to get a good look

at my returning attacker. I was shocked to see a female Praying Mantis. Following

my inspection the Praying Mantis regained her post on my doorway curtain.

Perhaps she enjoys the lavender color or the silky texture of the curtain, I am not

positive. Maybe she mistook me as a male Praying Mantis and planned to devour

me, but that would be highly unlikely. What I am positive about is that we are each

startled by the other’s presence.
    [post_title] => I have a friend
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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

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I have a friend

Liz Farrell,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

Description

I have a friend. This friend is not unwanted, however they do come as surprise, always unexpected. We do not meet often but when we do it always when they decide the time is right. We live close to each other; you could even say we share a house more specifically a doorway. You must […]

Posted On

04/6/14

Author

Liz Farrell

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    [post_date] => 2014-03-23 19:42:21
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-24 01:42:21
    [post_content] => See all of it. The water teal and translucent up close, coral making
a light and dark pattern on the ocean floor beneath you like marine
batik. A few yards out the surface reflecting the warm tones of the
setting sun, the star itself hidden behind the limestone cliffs you
passed on the way to Sawai earlier in the day. Hugging them in the
longboats, the sea an impossible green that became almost white where
the water level had perforated the walls of stone.

Just about the whole ROYGBIV spectrum from left to right across the
sky now, all of it mirrored by the water. Clouds like cursive way out
on the horizon. A rainbow appears over the peninsula to the north, a
ladder of color that fades about 70 degrees into its arc above the
village. A smaller, fainter one just to its west. A man clears his
throat into a microphone. A splash somewhere behind you followed by
laughter. An outboard motor sputtering in the distance. The stilted
houses along the shore either glowing or silhouetted with light. Even
the trees absorbing a little orange.

The first lines of the call to prayer begin to echo over the water,
spoken slowly at first. A light rain speckles the surface, pocking and
inverting it, crackling and hissing, those countless craters the only
difference now between sea and sky. A boat comes in to the village,
unzipping the reflection that immediately heals like some miracle
scar. The amplified voice rises to a wail, a spiral-shaped sound that
grows toward the heavens. The tide a mere tremble, its ripples moving
in as if conveyed. The voice pauses to be replenished then rises
again, reverberating from the forest out over the bay as the
tin-sheeted spire of Sawai's modest mosque starts to gleam like a
flame, a pregnant candle hovering over the roofs of thatch and
weathered wood.

A turtle surfaces and dives and surfaces again.

The sea fading into a color you might call mauve. The furnace cooling
a bit now. The rainbows more like stains marking where they used to be
than visible per se. The ocean undulating with the crescendo of the
azan, that voice that calls out over the waters seeming to beckon
them, too. I don't know if he's mourning, but it sounds that way.
Maybe it's just the time of day. The fluorescent lights on the fishing
bagan anchored far out in the harbor flick on.

Maybe this is prayer. This listening and watching. This paying
attention. Seeing all of it musters a deep Thank you in me, a gentle
vibration from the trenches of the soul. This gratitude that is more
reflexive than conjured must surely be the first, truest prayer.

The Arabic verse faded like an old promise, its words little more than
music to me. But I hope it spoke of love and justice and compassion
and mercy. I like to think it spoke of the mysteries. Of the tide that
now recedes like someone breathing as they sleep, of the blue spots on
the needlefish and the school of tiny minnow that are an apparition
sifting through the reeds, shape-shifting like a flock of starlings.

We shared a meal and played music and watched the fishing boats go out
and said thank you. Even as barrel bombs fall in the neighborhoods of
Homs, and the search for the missing continues, and news arrives of a
loved one's sudden passing, we well with prayers of sea turtles and
cloudbursts and skies like the end of the world.

What's more human than that, after all? And what's more divine?
    [post_title] => Praying in Sawai
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View post

Praying in Sawai

Caleb Brooks,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014

Description

See all of it. The water teal and translucent up close, coral making a light and dark pattern on the ocean floor beneath you like marine batik. A few yards out the surface reflecting the warm tones of the setting sun, the star itself hidden behind the limestone cliffs you passed on the way to […]

Posted On

03/23/14

Author

Caleb Brooks

WP_Post Object
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    [post_date] => 2014-03-21 13:41:54
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-21 19:41:54
    [post_content] => 
Zoe told me she likes to try and do things of which she thought she would never do or couldn’t. Indonesian dance was one of those things. Zoe likes to dance but never took dance classes before. When she came to my house for the first time to learn Indonesian dance, I showed her videos of different kind of dance styles (Yogyakarta, Balinese, East Javanese, West Javanese, etc). Zoe chose the last one: ‘Sonteng’ from Bandung, west Java. It is a very nice and dinamic dance, but not the most easy to do! Like almost all Indonesian dances, this dance is very different from the western dance styles. It has different kind of movements and it might be hard for non-Indonesian bodystructures. But Zoe showed us: she can do it! With a lot of positive energy and a good will, Zoe learnt the dance and was realy able to listen to the details of the music to hit the music with her movements. And that in just three weeks! Every time Zoe came to practice, I could see her good will to learn everything and she was realy enjoying everything. At the farewell party, Zoe showed her dance to all attendees in full costume. It was very nice to see her dance and enjoying it! She gleamed. The public was stunned. At the end of the dance, Zoe went to the public to invite them to dance with her. Even her Yogya-dad, who normaly is quite quiet, came up to dance with her. Very nice! Zoe showed us all: you can do everything as long as you try it! -Anouk (Zoe's dance teacher) Photo 1: Zoe and Anouk Photo 2: Zoe pulling Chris up to participate in her ISP presentation Photo 3: Zoe's ISP performance [post_title] => Expand your borders [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => expand-borders [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-03 11:25:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-03 18:25:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=99118 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 185 [name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014 [slug] => indonesia-semester-spring-2014 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 185 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 238 [count] => 66 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 9.1 [cat_ID] => 185 [category_count] => 66 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014 [category_nicename] => indonesia-semester-spring-2014 [category_parent] => 238 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2014/indonesia-semester-spring-2014/ ) [1] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 56 [name] => Internships and Independent Study Projects [slug] => internships-and-independent-study-projects [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 56 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 488 [count] => 37 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 34.1 [cat_ID] => 56 [category_count] => 37 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Internships and Independent Study Projects [category_nicename] => internships-and-independent-study-projects [category_parent] => 488 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/program-components/internships-and-independent-study-projects/ ) ) [category_links] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014, Internships and Independent Study Projects )
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Expand your borders

Anouk,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2014, Internships and Independent Study Projects

Description

Zoe told me she likes to try and do things of which she thought she would never do or couldn’t. Indonesian dance was one of those things. Zoe likes to dance but never took dance classes before. When she came to my house for the first time to learn Indonesian dance, I showed her videos […]

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