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    [post_date] => 2011-03-06 00:00:00
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There was a life behind these dolls - bruises, birthdays, ripe mangoes, muddy toes. And there was life after they passed to remember them- sisters, brothers, children perhaps. I looked up at them while sitting on a hot boulder beneath the cliff graves. These tau tau, as the Torajan call them, are sculptures molded to resemble the deceased that could afford a sacrifice of 14 buffalo to the village for their funeral ceremony. I saw them in their new homes in the mountains and felt that I was in some way visiting a people of the past. There was a weight, and I knew I was not alone in feeling it. Even if none of us could describe or understand what was pushing against us in silence, we were interacting with this space. Maybe it was the freedom to create stories for people I would never meet. Maybe it was the lichen itching forward on the rock surface, pronouncing its years of curious growth. Maybe it was the culture of keeping lost loved ones so close to the present. I sat and felt the enormity of time: of life and death and how interwoven the two really are. I asked a woman in Limbong recently if she was afraid of death. She smiled. If I am happy in life, she said, I will be happy in death.

We went fishing in a rice paddy the other day. Crossed in mud - colder and thicker as our feet sank through- towards the circle where the rice angels sleep, as the Torajans say. I caught a fish inside the angel’s ring. Rather, I lowered my arms into the murky waters and the fish seemed to swim into me. I cradled it up in my arms, but there was no struggle, only a gentle opening and closing of its lips. We cleaned this fish, along with 7 others in the stream nearby, cleared out their organs, and barbequed them with salt over a fire. We ate off of banana leaves, peeling pieces of fish into our rice and jabañero chili; scooping healthily into our mouths, pushing the portions forward with our thumbs. I ate quietly, thanking the fish for my nutrition.

Life and death- how intricately indivisible they are. How gifted I am to be a part of them both.

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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Life and Death

Kiara Segal,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

There was a life behind these dolls – bruises, birthdays, ripe mangoes, muddy toes. And there was life after they passed to remember them- sisters, brothers, children perhaps. I looked up at them while sitting on a hot boulder beneath the cliff graves. These tau tau, as the Torajan call them, are sculptures molded to […]

Posted On

03/6/11

Author

Kiara Segal

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For my independant study project I decided to look at local religion and how it impacted and combined with local culture. For example I recently looked at how Chrisianty interacted with the local practice of ancestor worship in Tana Taraja and also how Balinese Hinduism might differ from other kinds of Hinduism as might be practiced in India and other parts of the world. Thats all for now, I hope to figure out more later on.

Don't worry I plan to write a full Yak soon. It will probably be amazing. Well worth the wait. Saving the best for last.

[post_title] => ISP Update from Langdon [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => isp-update-from-langdon [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-03-06 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=45287 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 356 [name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [slug] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 356 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 256 [count] => 96 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 19.1 [cat_ID] => 356 [category_count] => 96 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [category_nicename] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [category_parent] => 256 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2011/indonesia-semester-spring-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 )

Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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ISP Update from Langdon

Langdon Thaxter,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

For my independant study project I decided to look at local religion and how it impacted and combined with local culture. For example I recently looked at how Chrisianty interacted with the local practice of ancestor worship in Tana Taraja and also how Balinese Hinduism might differ from other kinds of Hinduism as might be […]

Posted On

03/6/11

Author

Langdon Thaxter

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At this point I have settled on studying indigenous religion and shamanism as the primary focus of my Independent Study Program, as in how the different Indonesian peoples viewed and communicated with God(s) or the spirit world before Hindu, Islam and Christianity replaced these views, or how the introduction of these religions may have been simply incorporated into the original indigenous beliefs. I plan on comparing what I find to what I know about the indigenous Alaskan Native beliefs.

I am also interested in medicinal plants and may study them on the side or somehow incorporate them if appropriate.

[post_title] => ISP - Keenan Troll [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => isp-keenan-troll [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-03-06 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=45288 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 356 [name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [slug] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 356 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 256 [count] => 96 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 19.1 [cat_ID] => 356 [category_count] => 96 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [category_nicename] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [category_parent] => 256 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2011/indonesia-semester-spring-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 )

Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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ISP – Keenan Troll

Keenan Troll,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

At this point I have settled on studying indigenous religion and shamanism as the primary focus of my Independent Study Program, as in how the different Indonesian peoples viewed and communicated with God(s) or the spirit world before Hindu, Islam and Christianity replaced these views, or how the introduction of these religions may have been […]

Posted On

03/6/11

Author

Keenan Troll

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    [post_date] => 2011-03-06 00:00:00
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    [post_content] => 

Selamat Sore!

First off I'd just like to explain the reason for our seeming lack of Yak-Yak posts by emphasizing the amount of effort that it takes to get online in Indonesia-- a perfect example occurred today shortly after our arrival in Kolondale on Sulawesi which is basically the gateway to our next destination Morowali. We checked into our guest house just fine, settled for a bit and headed out in search of food and internet hot spots. We eventually found one dimly lit, teal web cafe that was perfectly nice UNTIL about 30 minutes into our web surfing when the power blew in the whole place. Woops. When asked when we could fire up again, the man running the place responded with something like "tidak tahu-- hati hati"= "Don't know-- slow slow." That's just the way it goes here-- hati hati. There was really nothing to do but sit here in the dark listening to backstreet boys and jason mraz songs (quite obviously covers) and sing with the little man working here. Turned out not being half bad.

Anyway, Sulawesi has proven to be an incredibly curious place and getting more and more so. We're all working on individual ISP projects that cover a vast range of topics. I've chosen to work on with the language incorporating stories, myths and simple narratives in combination with drawings. I've been working narratively in my own art practice recently, so the application of bahasa Indonesia is becoming more and more intreaguing to me. New possibilities keep presenting themselves in unexpected ways.

Lots and lots of love!! Missing you all more and more!

Em

[post_title] => hello friends, family, friend's family and family friends! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => hello-friends-family-friends-family-and-family-friends [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-03-06 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=45289 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 356 [name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [slug] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 356 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 256 [count] => 96 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 19.1 [cat_ID] => 356 [category_count] => 96 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [category_nicename] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [category_parent] => 256 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2011/indonesia-semester-spring-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 )

Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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hello friends, family, friend’s family and family friends!

Emily Chambers,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

Selamat Sore! First off I’d just like to explain the reason for our seeming lack of Yak-Yak posts by emphasizing the amount of effort that it takes to get online in Indonesia– a perfect example occurred today shortly after our arrival in Kolondale on Sulawesi which is basically the gateway to our next destination Morowali. […]

Posted On

03/6/11

Author

Emily Chambers

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    [post_date] => 2011-03-06 00:00:00
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One of what I see as the main challenges of home stays is allowing yourself to feel comfortable in a place that is, to some extent, uncomfortable. That is not to say that the houses themselves are uncomfortable, but rather that we are used to the idea of home as being a place where you can totally relax, and being in a home stay can feel intimidating and a little nerve wracking. But with two home stays down, I have learned that these preconceived notions are, like most, false.

It is starting to feel like we are getting the hang of it. And there is a lot to get used to: being a complete guest in someone’s house and trying to feel comfortable in a distinctly different place, fumbling with our dictionaries to try and express what it is we want to say, be it how delicious the food is or how much we appreciate the hospitality (the word for which I finally have remembered is kerama tamahan, so even if you do find the word in your dictionary it is such a mouthful that it can be hard to get out!).

Our first home stay was comparatively urban. Located just 30 minutes from Ubud in Tanggayuda, we were living comfortably. For any emergency need, there was an air conditioned supermarket just up the road. The families all welcomed us in with delicious food wrapped in banana leaves and a comfortable bed to sleep on. I found such warmth and comfort from the kindness extended to us by these families that connecting with them felt logical and simple. They were so excited to receive us and hear about our lives and just as eager to share.

After leaving Bali we headed to Tana Toraja, Sulawesi where we trekked to Limbong, where our second home stay took place and severely juxtaposed the first. Limbong is a remote town, far from any store containing that chocolate bar you are craving or the particular shampoo you want. That said it makes sense that our home stay in Limbong was a bit daunting for many of us. In addition to it being remote, there was no English spoken there. But upon arriving at my home for the next few days, I found that my excitement about living in a traditional Torajan house, the Tongkonan, outweighed my nerves. And though I grinded many a conversation to a screeching halt while I flipped through my dictionary to find one word or another, I found ways to connect with my family that trumped that communication. For example, my home stay brother would wash the family’s buffalo (kerbau in Bahasa Indonesia) every morning and the Grandmother would sit and point out missed spots and hand him buckets of water to address each spot. By resolutely sitting down next to her and handling the bucket, I found that though my words sometimes just floated through the air between us, not fully making sense to anyone, I was able to participate in an important and valuable ritual that connected us and gave a base of familiarity. With that element of comfort, I was able to laugh at myself when I misspoke or slipped up the steep stairs to my room, and similarly my family felt comfortable enough with me to do the same.

I think one of the main things I have learned from the home stays this far is that though the language barrier can be a hard one to break down, there are many other ways to connect with people. And though all of our Bahasa Indonesia is improving, knowing that I can connect and feel at ease with people who are so beautifully different from me offers a great deal of comfort. And once that awkwardness dissipates, I find myself able to learn and observe and understand the ways of the people we are lucky to live with.

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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A Sense of Home

Marjorie Isaacs,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

One of what I see as the main challenges of home stays is allowing yourself to feel comfortable in a place that is, to some extent, uncomfortable. That is not to say that the houses themselves are uncomfortable, but rather that we are used to the idea of home as being a place where you […]

Posted On

03/6/11

Author

Marjorie Isaacs

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    [post_date] => 2011-03-03 00:00:00
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    [post_content] => 

As the students begin to think more about their ISPs some of us are faced with struggles in how to begin them, myself included. But then again, what seems better than to just dive right in?

My topic began with three possibilities.

The first of which was a comparative study between my own spiritual searching and the religions found all over Indonesia. Then I decided that, being a set-in-my-ways Agnostic, with my own ideas of spirituality and how far it can go, that I may just end up upsetting the locals, and myself, more than I would learning about their beliefs, as well as my own.

The second idea was housing and what work went into their abodes. But it all just seemed so technical.

The third idea was their clothing. Mainly their everyday wear and a little bit on their ceremonial dressings. Because I was once an aspiring fasion designer, before deciding my ideas were more idealistic than based on actual measurement, I decided this seemed appropriate.

So which idea was best? The obvious choice was fasion. That was before I came saw that their everyday wear was almost completely Americanized, besides the ceremonial dress. I was/am not very interested in just studying ceremony wear, with the side street being why they were wearing Wu Tang Clan and Marilyn Manson shirts and cargo pants; because I had originally intended it to be the opposite. This is were I hit my first road block. Try as I might, I could not get interested in the idea and the studies that the idea would present me with. I began to question my choice in interest.

A few days ago, in the small village of Limbong, I realized that there were two main houses types. “normal houses” on stilts, and Toconans, elegant houses with roofs that looked like they had had a boat placed on top of them. Needless to say I have since switched my study topic.

Many Indonesians put a lot of emphasis on stories that have been passed down. Because of this, their culture shows these stories in one way or another.

One of these stories tells why, in Tona Torajan houses, you may see a crocodile somewhere in the house. Provided by a good friend Rante.

A man was walking from the village to his rice field, which was by the river. On his way he met a crocodile, who threatened to eat him. The man begged the crocodile to spare his life, and the crocodile agreed if they could come to an understanding. The crocodiles did not like that the people were washing their dishes in the river. Spicy foods are a favorite here in Indonesia, but not among the river dwelling animal. The crocodile explained that the spicy sauce was dangerous for them. “It gets in our eyes, we cannot see anything. Why would you do this?” The crocodiles were also not happy about being in Saluwesi, they just didn’t like the land I guess. So the man agreed that they would not wash the dishes in the river anymore and the crocodile was happy. Then the crocodiles left the island. I guess they just got the balls to leave after that, because, as far as I know, the villagers follwed through with their word.The crocodiles, in the homes, now represent power and protection from bad spirits. I would reccomend asking a Tona Torajan about the story tough, because, like any foriegn tale, it is best narrated by a local who grew up with it. It’s like asking an Indonesian to explain the story of the tooth fairy after hearing an American say it.

Personally, I am glad with the topic I have settled with. I am excited to hear more about the different houses in different homestay villages, because as far as I can tell they all have their own arcitecture and stories to go along with it.

Love from Indonesia,

Alex

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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Learning from Interest (ISP update – Alex)

Alex Green,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

As the students begin to think more about their ISPs some of us are faced with struggles in how to begin them, myself included. But then again, what seems better than to just dive right in? My topic began with three possibilities. The first of which was a comparative study between my own spiritual searching […]

Posted On

03/3/11

Author

Alex Green

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Hi all,

During our homestay in Limbong, we had ample time to think about the topics for our Independent Study Projects. We all utilized Rante and Otto (our amazing guides,) as translators and went around to different people in the village to discuss our ISPs. My project is: The major public health issues in different parts of Indonesia, whether they be water-bourne, blood bourne, etc, and how much influence western medicine vs. traditional medicine has had on the different regions. I had a wonderful interview with two women from the village. I was incredibly impressed by the sophistication of their healthcare system and was also very surprised to hear that the nearest clinic was over 1 hour away by walking, and their idea of an ambulance is a pew from the church carried by 4 strong men. I had such a wonderful time talking to the locals with Otto and Katie. They we extremely open and helpful and I learned a lot.

Everyone else’s projects seem very interesting, and I am looking forward to seeing the end results!

Miss you family! xo

Anna

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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ISP Update from Anna

Anna Porter,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

Hi all, During our homestay in Limbong, we had ample time to think about the topics for our Independent Study Projects. We all utilized Rante and Otto (our amazing guides,) as translators and went around to different people in the village to discuss our ISPs. My project is: The major public health issues in different […]

Posted On

03/3/11

Author

Anna Porter

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    [post_date] => 2011-03-03 00:00:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00
    [post_content] => 

I came to Indonesia with a rough idea of some things to expect, but I still hoped to be surprised nonetheless. This wish has come true every day.

We have just completed a 6-hour trek back to Rantepao, after 2 days of trekking to the Tana Torajan village of Limbong and a 3-day homestay there. Still I sustain what I must reluctantly describe as a warm and fuzzy feeling from the experience. My "brother" and I spent Tuesday night with some other local teenage guys playing some Torajan folk songs. I do not know the songs nor the language they were in, but I listen and occasionaly hum along to the chorus. They seemed unphased by my presence, and we had a great time. I was impressed with the guitarist--he was playing a right-handed guitar left-handed and upside-down.

The next day was to be our last in Limbong before we departed this morning. I decided to spend the day feeling like a kid again. I went on a walk with Arlo and Monique to check out some fascinating insects. Monique found a small crab whom I affectionately named Augustus. Sadly, our friendship spanned a grand total of 20 minutes, and I let him go free.

I returned to the village to engage in small-scale architecture with the pack of young girls running around. We were building miniscule houses out of pieces of wood and bark (an idea spurred by Alexandra), destroying them and rebuilding better ones. We finally were satisfied with a small sekolah, complete with a bendera (School with a flag). Inevitably, the pack of young boys came around and were observing our activities with puzzled looks on their faces. I came to the conclusion that they were bored and wanted to play. I asked them "Mao Bermain?" (wanna play?), and they responded with eager smiles and nods. Diego miraculously produced the Secret Weapon, a collapsible frisbee. We tossed it back and forth, I attempted to impress them with behind-the-back and under-the-leg throws for 5 minutes before the Secret Weapon ended up on a roof, thanks to me. Oh well. I proceeded to dish out a few dangerous, high-speed piggyback rides which soon left me exhausted.

It came time for our meeting with the leaders of the community for an exchange of questions. Isaac, this week's kepala (chief) presented the questions, and our guide Otto acted as interpreter. We learned a multitude about the workings of the Torajan community and its surrounding agriculture. While this was happening I couldn't help but notice that the boys had scrapped our sekolah and were fashioning all sorts of articulate structures, fighting over the big pieces of bark just like I used to fight with my brother over valuable Lego™ pieces.

After answering a few questions in return, we presented them with our gift--a large water tank to be used at massive funeral gatherings. They displayed their gratitude and we collectively concluded that the Where There Be Dragons team and the village of Limbong were as one big Kelguara: family.

We dispersed, and less than an hour later some of us reconvened there with the guitar. Soon, to my pleasant surprise, we were joined by the older men of the village, other students from the Dragons team, and our guides Otto and Rante. We listen, and entertain them with attempts to sing a few songs of our own.

The other Dragons disperse, but I decide to stick around. The cigarettes glowing in the dark mimic the stars above, and attract the attention of an ambitious firefly. Unlike the ones I have encountered in the lower 48, who unleash a quick burst of light that quickly fades, this little guy sustains his glow and hovers around us for a solid half hour before finding a perch atop a rice barn. Is this one of their ancestors, who are believed to descend from the heavens and sit atop these boat-shaped roofs?

I slept peacefully that night, of course awakened the next morning by the roosters faithfully practicing their calls. Why do I even set an alarm in this country?...

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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The Warm Fuzzies

Keenan Troll,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

I came to Indonesia with a rough idea of some things to expect, but I still hoped to be surprised nonetheless. This wish has come true every day. We have just completed a 6-hour trek back to Rantepao, after 2 days of trekking to the Tana Torajan village of Limbong and a 3-day homestay there. […]

Posted On

03/3/11

Author

Keenan Troll

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For my Independent Student Project I will be looking at the role water plays in different Indonesian cultures. I will learn about the use of water in both a practical and spirtitual sense. I have learned how to identify whether the local water ways are clean by searching for certain types of insects. I will continue toemploy this technique to judge and recordthe water in different areas we visit. In addition, I will interview locals and discussther view on how water should/is used.

[post_title] => ISP Update from Monique [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => isp-update-from-monique [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-03-03 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=45307 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 356 [name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [slug] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 356 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 256 [count] => 96 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 19.1 [cat_ID] => 356 [category_count] => 96 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [category_nicename] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [category_parent] => 256 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2011/indonesia-semester-spring-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 )

Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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ISP Update from Monique

Monique Kelmenson,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

For my Independent Student Project I will be looking at the role water plays in different Indonesian cultures. I will learn about the use of water in both a practical and spirtitual sense. I have learned how to identify whether the local water ways are clean by searching for certain types of insects. I will […]

Posted On

03/3/11

Author

Monique Kelmenson

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Hi Everyone!

This is my first ever in-field yak, and I am a little unsure of how to start, but I guess just jumping in is probably the best thing to do. So, here goes!

In trying to decide on one final topic for my ISP, I found it hard to nail anything specific down. There is so much about life on Bali and here in Sulawesi that is intriuging, exciting, different, and new. With all of the different threads catching my interest, I decided to keep my ISP somewhat open and not limit myself with any one specific topic. I have chosen to begin by studying the life cycle of the people who we are living with, and already I have found very diverse traditions and ideals that make up the roots of the life cycles here. For example, the rich funeral ceremonies of the Tana Torajan people or the respect and reverence of the Hindu religion on Bali. I think that this topic gives me freedom to explore many aspects of life here, while at the same time tying it back to this central theme of important aspects of the life cycle.

Okay, I am not sure if that made any sense, but it is still a work in progress and certianly will make a whole lot of sense by the end of this trip.

Marjorie

[post_title] => My ISP (by Marjorie) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => my-isp-by-marjorie [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2011-03-03 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=45308 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 356 [name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [slug] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 356 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 256 [count] => 96 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 19.1 [cat_ID] => 356 [category_count] => 96 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 [category_nicename] => indonesia-semester-spring-2011 [category_parent] => 256 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2011/indonesia-semester-spring-2011/ ) ) [category_links] => Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011 )

Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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My ISP (by Marjorie)

Marjorie Isaacs,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

Hi Everyone! This is my first ever in-field yak, and I am a little unsure of how to start, but I guess just jumping in is probably the best thing to do. So, here goes! In trying to decide on one final topic for my ISP, I found it hard to nail anything specific down. […]

Posted On

03/3/11

Author

Marjorie Isaacs

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