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Hi, everyone, I'm 18 and I live in a small town in Maine. As I read the requirements for posting on the yak yak, I struggle with answering the who you are”part because I'm not 100% sure. Although, I do know I love to travel, challenge myself, and explore. I am excited to embark on this journey and learn about Indonesia. To be quite honest, I'm excited about everything.

I look forward to meeting you all.

Sincerely,

Monique

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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Introduction

Monique Kelmenson,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

Hi, everyone, I’m 18 and I live in a small town in Maine. As I read the requirements for posting on the yak yak, I struggle with answering the “who you are”part because I’m not 100% sure. Although, I do know I love to travel, challenge myself, and explore. I am excited to embark on […]

Posted On

01/24/11

Author

Monique Kelmenson

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    [post_date] => 2011-01-18 00:00:00
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Hi all,

My name is Anna Porter, and I live in Brookline, MA- yes I am heartbroken about the Patriots and there loss this weekend...

I just returned from Spain where I was studying Spanish, living with a host family, and enjoying Spanish culture in Barcelona. Its been a really weird transition back home, but so far, I have really enjoyed living stress-free and hanging out with my family.

I have always known a gap-year was in the cards for me. My mom and dad always wanted it for me, and I was not complaining. For the second half on my term, I knew I wanted something more rustic and challenging then Barcelona. I have never been a big risk taker, and I saw this as my one shot to prove myself wrong. I had heard lots about "Where there be dragons," my cousin has done two programs, and countless others in my area have as well. I looked through the programs and Indonesia caught my eye, (maybe I was taking a little inspiration from Eat, Pray, Love.) The course sounds amazing, and I am so excited to meet all of you. I am really excited to do artisan work in Bali, and all the yoga. I am also very interested in global studies and health, so I am really interested in learning about the region culturally in those aspects.

I love to swim, which I know we will get to do, and I also love to hike, so this program seemed like the perfect fit to me. I am not nervous about anything, except I just bought my backpack and can't believe that everything for 3 months is supposed to fit.... I can't wait to meet all of you, see you very soon!!

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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Hi!

Anna Porter,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

Hi all, My name is Anna Porter, and I live in Brookline, MA- yes I am heartbroken about the Patriots and there loss this weekend… I just returned from Spain where I was studying Spanish, living with a host family, and enjoying Spanish culture in Barcelona. Its been a really weird transition back home, but […]

Posted On

01/18/11

Author

Anna Porter

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Letter of Introduction from Diego Merino

By Diego Merino

January 16, 2011

While Katie looks out on a serene scene of New England in the winter, and Aldo gazes at brilliant Pacific sunsets from under the eaves of the rainforest, I am in Madurai, in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, watching a classic Indian cityscape going by my window: a traffic mix of rattletrap buses, mix of motorbikes, bicycles, auto-rickshaws and the occasional cow; women in brightly colored saris and men with imposing moustaches; a liberal application of dirt and trash spread over the scene; and a million times more honking than is really necessary.

But down the street is the reason I’m spending a month in this otherwise unremarkable city: I’m working for People’s Watch, a local organization that has been working for human rights in Tamil Nadu for the last fifteen years. I share this with you for three reasons.

First, to point out that in more or less every corner of the planet where people live, there are groups of people – students, teachers, health workers, women, indigenous people, young people, lawyers, businesspeople, citizens of all kinds, even the occasional political leader – who come together to face the daunting challenges in their communities, like poverty, discrimination, environmental degradation, and the loss of cultural traditions. (I’m sure you know many of these people already. Perhaps you are already one yourself.)

Second, to suggest to you that far from being a separate realm, human rights are inextricably linked with the issues of community, culture and conservation that this program focuses on. Not only that, human rights also give us a powerful lens with which to look at those issues, and can empower us to find ways of making a difference, both during and after our experience in Indonesia. Please: before you get to Bali, drink a cup of tea or coffee and read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights – more than 60 years after it was written, it’s more relevant than ever to the challenges of today.

And third, to share with you about myself. For the last several years, my work has consisted in supporting many creative, courageous grassroots groups activists for social justice, environmental sustainability and human rights, especially in Latin America. My experience with these groups has become a profound source of inspiration to me. Over the last year, I’ve already had the privilege of working with similar groups in Indonesia, and I am incredibly excited about walking with, learning from and working side by side with the indigenous communities and grassroots organizations that we will visit on this program.

I can’t emphasize strongly enough two themes that Aldo and Katie have already mentioned in their letters. On one hand, the incredible potential of this kind of travel to be a profound experience that transforms our view of ourselves, our capabilities, and the world. And on the other, the message that no matter how hard I and the rest of the Dragons team work to make an amazing program, the bottom line is that the single biggest factor in that determines your experience will be you. As you’re packing your bags (and I’m offering a special dinner to the two students with the lightest backpacks), make sure you don’t forget the most important items: flexibility, patience, sense of humor, adventuring spirit, open-mindedness, vulnerability, generosity, and compassion.

And while I’m on the subject, the next-most important factor in your experience, after yourself, will be each other. The very first thing we have to do to lay the foundation for an incredible semester is to build up our own little community, from scratch, based on the values we choose together. If you haven’t already done it, help us get this task started right, by sharing your first Yak. Katie’s explained the first Yak assignment in her letter already:

Posting Yaks is an important part of the Dragons experience.Yaks are a wonderful way of documenting our journey and allowing the world to share in our unique experiences.We’ll all be posting LOTS of Yaks and photos during the course, so let’s start getting into the swing of things now!Your first assignment for this program will be to take some time, reflect upon your reasons for joining this course and post a Yak letting us all know who you are, where you are and what excites you most about our upcoming adventure.

Also, consider this: Where There Be Dragons is a metaphor, of course, for venturing out of our comfort zones and into unknown worlds. But unlike every other destination that Dragons travels to, in Indonesia there really are dragons! We’re venturing deep, deep into one of the most fantastically diverse places in the world – environmentally, biologically, culturally, and linguistically. The places we go and the people we meet there are going to stretch our minds and hearts and touch our lives in ways we can’t even yet imagine.

I can’t wait to start the journey with you. See you soon!

Diego

diego.merino@gmail.com

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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Letter of introduction from Diego Merino

Diego Merino,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

Letter of Introduction from Diego Merino By Diego Merino January 16, 2011 While Katie looks out on a serene scene of New England in the winter, and Aldo gazes at brilliant Pacific sunsets from under the eaves of the rainforest, I am in Madurai, in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, watching a classic […]

Posted On

01/17/11

Author

Diego Merino

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Island / Region Key

USA

Bali

Sulawesi

Maluku (The Bandas)

PROPOSED ITINERARY

Dates

Place Name

Description of activities

Feb 9

Depart LAX

Depart Los Angeles,

Feb 10-13

Arrive Bali

Bali - Initial student orientation and welcome. Students will stay in family run guesthouse for first few days. Scavenger hunts and language lessons.

Feb 14-20

Tanggayuda, Bali

Semi-urban homestays in the village of Tanggayuda, intensive language study, internships with local artists and / or service opportunities, rice-planting, traditional performances, meet with local healers, learn how to make Balinese offerings,sunrise hike up Mt Batur, Intro to Balinese Hinduism, attend ceremonies in local temples.

Feb 21

Depart Bali

Depart Bali on Lion Air (7 am) for Makassar (arrive 8:15 am). Travel directly to Tana Toraja in the highlands of central Sulawesi.

Feb 22 - March 2

To Tana Toraja, Sulawesi

Tana Toraja: Students will meet the Torajan people, renowned for their elaborate funeral rites and burial caves carved into rocky cliffs. Meet with elders in the tongkonan ancestral houses and learn about aluk, the indigenous animistic belief system which governs social life, agricultural practices, and ancestral rituals. Discover the important social and religious role of woodcarving and other traditional art forms through workshops and meetings with local artisans. Trek for 3 days through stunning valleys and picturesque terraced rice fields, and learn about Torajan daily life through a unique 5-day homestay.

March 3

To Pendolo, Sulawesi

Travel from Rantepeo to picturesque Pendolo on Lake Poso .

March 4

Pendolo, Sulawesi

Rest day in Pendolo. Fun at Danau (Lake) Poso and fresh fish BBQ.

March 5

To Kolonodale, Sulawesi

To Kolonodale (early) Meet with NGO Friends of Morowali to learn about the Wana people and local environmental / cultural identity issues.

March 6 - 12

To Morowali ark, Sulawesi

Trek through the stunning Morowali Nature Reserve - tropical rain forest and home to a number of rare endemic birds and mammals. Spend time with the forest-dwelling Wana, the indigenous people who reside within the reserve and along its boundaries. Learn about sustainable hunting and gathering practices used by the Wana, collect rattan and harvest cassava. Students will explore current issues facing the Wana including the destruction of the pristine primary rainforest in which they live, relocation, health and the challenges of maintaining cultural identity in a raidly changing world.

March 13

To Kendari, Sulawesi

Travel from Kolonodale to Kendari on the Pelni Ship, Tilongkabila or by car down the eastern coast.

March 14

To Wanci, Sulawesi

Take the morning boat from Kendari to Wanci (leaves 10 am, arrives 8 p.m.) and spend the night in Wanci.

March 15-16

To Hoga, Sulawesi

Travel from Wanci to Hoga on the morning speedboat at 10:00. Stay on Hoga for initial marine and coral reef ecology classes. Beach cleanup and snorkeling at one of the world’s most biodiverse marine environments.

March 17-24

To Sampella, Sulawesi

Stay on Sampella (Bajau/Sea Gypsy) Village in homestays. Learn about intertidal farming, Bajau cooking, seaweed (agar) farming, unique Bajau religious practices and local rites and rituals. Meet with local shamans and witch doctors, and Sampela’s renowned fisherman. Learn about local fishing practices and conservation issues. Meet with Bajau elders to share life stories and learn about local ethnic relationships in the region.

March 25

To Hoga, Sulawesi

On Hoga Island for debrief of homestay and mid-course reflection / goal setting for second half of program.

March 26

To Bau Bau, Sulawesi

Early morning departure for Wanci and night boat to Bau Bau.

March 27

Bau Bau, Sulawesi

Arrival in Bau Bau; shopping for supplies for Pelni trip to Bandas. Rest day.

March 28-29

To Bandas, Sulawesi

Morning Pelni ship from Bau Bau to Bandas (via Ambon)

March 30-April 8

To Bandas, Maluku

Arrival in Banda - exploration of the Spice Islands (Palau Ayr, Run, Lontar and Hatta), hike Gunung Api volcano to see sunrise, harvest nutmeg, cloves, an d kenari nuts with local farmers, learn about the rich history of the islands and their role in the Spice Trade. Meet with local students and teach English in BandaNeira. Learn abut current interfaith dialogue in the region and how the past conflict is being resolved. Help out in the local sea turtle breeding center. Study coral reef ecology and marine biology while snorkeling the pristine waters of the outer islands.

April 9-11

To Seram, Maluku

Fly from Banda to Amahai on island of Seram. Travel by vehicle to Saka and take longboats to Sawai for two nights in Pak Ali’s guest house.

April 12-20

In Masihulan, Maluku

Homestays in Masihulan with local families. Service learning alongside ex-bird poachers-turned eco-guides at the local bird rehabilitation center. Climb tree platform to seek out cockatoos, lorikeets and other endangered birds. Learn traditional Maluku songs at community campfires and explore the pristine mangroves by longboat.

April 21-25

To Manusela National Park, Maluku

River trip up the Sawalai river by longboats, harvest sago palm, and trek into Manusela National Park for forest ecology lessons, tree-climbing to canopy platforms, night fishing and a forest carbon survey.

April 26

To Ambon, Maluku

Travel to Ambon from Sawai via Saka using longboats and car.

April 27

To Ubud, Bali

Flight to Bali from Ambon

Aril 28-May 5

Student Led Expedition in Bali / Lombok

Student Led Expedition (possibilities include West Bali National Park or climbing Mount Rinjani on Lombok Island)

May 6-8

Ubud or Candidasa, Bali

Transference: student ISP presentations, program debrief and transference activities; final ceremony and celebrations.

May 9

Depart from Bali

Flight home

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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Proposed Semester Itinerary

Jamie Woodall,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

Island / Region Key USA Bali Sulawesi Maluku (The Bandas) PROPOSED ITINERARY Dates Place Name Description of activities Feb 9 Depart LAX Depart Los Angeles, Feb 10-13 Arrive Bali Bali – Initial student orientation and welcome. Students will stay in family run guesthouse for first few days. Scavenger hunts and language lessons. Feb 14-20 Tanggayuda, […]

Posted On

01/14/11

Author

Jamie Woodall

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Hello, fellow voyagers! The time for our departure approaches, and if you're like me, there's butterflies in your stomach and a tingling in your toes.

I want to drop a quick note about dictionaries. While you don't want to overburden yourself with too much weight, a pocket Indonesian/English dictionary weighs only a few ounces and contains a wealth of reference information. My honest hope is that all of you will be able to talk "around" an unknown word after some time in-country, but having a dictionary allows access to hundreds ofwords that you may otherwise never hear or read.

I myself am bringing two different dictionaries which will be available to the whole group, so this should in no way be read as a "you need this product" kind of message. I would, however, like to mention that the Tuttle Indonesian Pocket Dictionary is small enough to store in a cuscus' pouch and is affordably priced. (You can also pick one of these up in Bali for about $20 at any Periplus Bookstore)

So, if you feel you would profit from having a personal language reference, this is a good one. But you are also welcome to use mine, which have the undeniable benefit of being carried in my backpack and not in yours.

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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A note on Dictionaries

Arlo Pelegrin,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

Description

Hello, fellow voyagers! The time for our departure approaches, and if you’re like me, there’s butterflies in your stomach and a tingling in your toes. I want to drop a quick note about dictionaries. While you don’t want to overburden yourself with too much weight, a pocket Indonesian/English dictionary weighs only a few ounces and […]

Posted On

01/13/11

Author

Arlo Pelegrin

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Indonesia Semester Clothing & Equipment List

THINK LIGHT! You will have to put whatever you bring onto mini-buses, jeeps and boats and you may have to carry your bag for long distances. The lighter you pack, the happier you (and the rest of the group) will be! Pack your bag and then walk around the block three times. Anything you can live without? Students who arrive in Los Angeles drastically over-packed will be asked to send extra items home at their own expense. And although there will be many opportunities to do your laundry by hand, you’ll be happiest with light, wrinkle-free, quick-dry clothing that doesn’t easily show dirt.

We recommend that you bring what's listed here, and not much more. Remember: It is very important that you can fit all of your belongings into one backpack (and a day pack) that you are comfortable carrying on your own!

DO BRING:

  • A BACKPACK maximum 45 liters. If your stuff doesn’t fit into this size pack, you are packing too much!
  • A BACKPACK COVER: Waterproof slip to fit over backpack is important as we will likely experience a few big downpours in the rainforest.
  • Personal travel MOSQUITO NET (single) - should be lightweight and pack down small.
  • CAMERA and memory cards or film. For extended periods of travel, we recommend at least 4 GB of memory, especially if you are shooting video footage with your digital camera.
  • STURDY DAY PACK (less than 20 litres) for day trips. This must be well-made as it will be used daily and may be weighted down with books or gear and water for day hikes.
  • Small lightweight DRY BAG for camera and other small personal items on boat rides
  • THERMAREST inflatable mattress (will only be used for a short period on the program but is necessary for village stay in Morowali and a few other destinations). The 3/4 length style is good as it packs down really small and is enough to get you through a few nights on a hard floor.
  • Small MOSQUITO REPELLENT (smaller than 3 oz) you can buy more in Indonesia.
  • One pair of walking OR hiking SHOES Commonly known as “approach shoes”. The best option is a light, low top, quick-draining hiker or mountain running shoe that can double as a street shoe. (These must be able to fit inside your pack).
  • One pair of walking SANDALS like Chacos, Tevas, Keens or flip flops (again, these should fit inside your pack). Flip flops are readily available throughout Indonesia for approximately $2-3 USD/pair but are not as strong as some North American or European brands. Please note that is is also difficult to find large shoe sizes sizes (greater than men’s 11) in Indonesia. Please make sure that the top sides of the flip flops are textured to ensure that you can walk comfortably in them even if they are wet or muddy.
  • Small travel size SHAMPOO and conditioner that will last about one week. You can buy more in Indonesia when you run out.
  • TOOTHBRUSH and small tube of toothpaste. These are also available in Indonesia.
  • Small travel size SOAP. We recommend liquid form as it is much easier to deal with. You can buy more in-country when you run out.
  • One DEODORANT that you prefer, there is a limited selection here.
  • Lightweight small or medium sized QUICK-DRY TOWEL When you arrive, there will be opportunities to buy the traditional sarongs and bathing clothing that is used by most people in South East Asia.
  • RAIN JACKET / PONCHO (highly breathable and lightweight). Alternatively, you can buy a very compact rain poncho in Indonesia for USD $3-4.
  • WOOL or SYNTHETIC SOCKS* 2-3 pairs. Some wool socks are blended with nylon to make them more comfy and to help them last longer. Trail running socks would be ideal.
  • Small, lightweight HEADLAMP. Very important!
  • SWIM GOGGLES - just a small simple pair for river swims or quick glances under the surface.
  • MEDICATIONS of any kind, prescription or over the counter, with instructions on its use and dosage (by your doctor if by prescription).
  • MONEY BELT or Security Wallet: You’ll want to keep your passport, traveler’s checks and other valuables in a secure wallet or belt that’s well attached to your body. Eagle Creek makes good products.
  • SUNSCREEN, 30+ (1-2 bottles) You can buy refills, if needed, in Asia but it is more expensive).
  • LIP BALM WITH SUNSCREEN
  • SUNGLASSES with good UV protection and a hard case for rugged travel is advised.
  • GLASSES. If you wear glasses or contacts, please bring an extra pair.
  • WATCH with an alarm, but a small travel alarm clock will work as well. Waterproof watches are preferable.
  • WATER BOTTLE 1-Quart Plastic (such as a Nalgene) or Aluminum water bottle (such as a Sigg).
  • HAT which offers good sun protection.
  • THICKER SLEEPING SHEET or EXTREMELY LIGHTWEIGHT SLEEPING BAG – Sleeping sheets should be silk or cotton. Alternatively, you can bring any old sheet from home and then go on an adventure to find a seamstress in the local market to sew a sheet for you. Two inexpensive sarongs (available everywhere in Indonesia) sewn together will also serve this purpose! Alternatively, you can bring a lightweight sleeping bag (for use in warm climates) - just make sure it can pack down small. The latter is recommended if you tend to sleep cold.
  • A handful of strong Ziplock bags as they serve many purposes and keep things dry!
  • A JOURNAL and 2 pens.
  • Small ALBUM of pictures of family and friends including pictures of your house, school and local landscapes/cities. Pictures are great for starting conversations, using in English lessons, or just to ward off homesickness. Great for home stays too. (Suggestion: Avoid pictures showing immodest clothing such as bikinis as they are not culturally appropriate, especially in rural areas of Sulawesi and Maluku.)

Boys:

  • Two presentable and polite T-SHIRTs (you will get a Dragon’s t-shirt and this can serve as one t-shirt). Quick dry shirts that wick away sweat are a great choice. Try to avoid black or really dark colors, as it is hot in Indonesia! More t-shirts can be purchased in Indonesia if necessary.
  • One EXTRA T-SHIRT for sleeping in home-stays and villages
  • One LONG-SLEEVED SHIRT for hiking in the jungle (mosquito protection)
  • One LIGHTWEIGHT FLEECE TOP that dries quickly
  • One pair of lightweight shorts that can be worn for sleeping in home-stays and villages.
  • Five changes of UNDERWEAR (should not be visible in any cases).
  • SOCKS: 3 pairs (same as above)
  • One presentable COLLARED SHIRT (can be short sleeved as it will be hot. Bring light colors but try to avoid white entirely as it gets dirty easily.)
  • One-two pair(s) of smart/ casual PANTS (lightweight like Dockers). Please make sure that at least one pair is dressy enough to meet local officials.
  • Two pairs of smart/casual knee-length shorts. Quick dry shorts are ideal, but sturdy cotton shorts will work as well. Avoid thin mesh / athletic shorts as they are too casual.
  • One pair of board SHORTS or swimsuit shorts
  • Rash Guard or equivalent top for water based activities for 100% sun protection while snorkeling and exploring coral reefs

Girls:

  • One presentable and polite T-SHIRT (you will get a Dragon’s t-shirt and this can serve as your t-shirt). Quick dry shirts that wick away sweat are a great choice. Try to avoid black or really dark colors, as it is hot in Indonesia! More t-shirts can be purchased in Indonesia if necessary.
  • One modest, slightly dressy SHIRT or blouse for meetings with local officials (Bring light colors and try to avoid white entirely as it gets dirty easily)
  • One EXTRA T-SHIRT and shorts or lightweight pajama bottoms for sleeping in home-stays and villages. (NO TANK TOPS—girls’ shoulders should be covered.)
  • Five changes of UNDERWEAR (should not be visible in any cases).
  • SOCKS: 3 pairs. (same as above)
  • One presentable and modest lightweight SKIRT which is almost down to the ankles. It should not be possible to see underclothing through the skirt.
  • Two pairs of lightweight QUICK-DRY PANTS.
  • One swimsuit for snorkeling and other ocean/reef activities (see above) It can be one or two piece as it will be covered up anyway. (see below)
  • One pair of board shorts or swimsuit SHORTS which can double as shorts (must extend TO THE KNEE). Because women in Indonesia dress very modestly, girls will be required to wear rash-guards and shorts over their swimwear.
  • RASH GUARD or equivalent top for water based activities for 100% sun protection AND MODESTY while snorkeling and exploring coral reefs (see above)
  • Six-week supply of tampons (these are very difficult to find and very expensive in Indo) or look into Diva/Moon Cup. Pads are readily available in B ali and in bigger cities.

OPTIONAL:

  • HOMESTAY GIFTS A few simple things to present to home-stay families and to give away to people who help make our course special. Postcards of home, friendship bracelets, small calendars, buttons/pins, and inflatable globes are great, as well photos of yourself. Children’s English books are also appreciated everywhere. Students can also buy art / school supplies in Indo for a fraction of the cost and these are always welcome gifts. (Students can discuss other appropriate gifts when their instructors call to introduce themselves in mid-August)
  • ELECTROLYTES: You can buy electrolyte powder to mix with water here in Indonesia, and the local brand name, Pocari is readily available. But, if you prefer additional flavors such that it might be a good idea to bring some from home for hiking.
  • VITAMIN SUPPLEMENT POWDER: Emergen-C or similar vitamin powders are an extra treat along long walks.
  • Foam EAR PLUGS for noisy planes or rural homestays, Great for people who know they are light sleepers.

*One other thing that is essential equipment: A HEALTHY BODY! Your experience will be so much more enjoyable if you come with a body that is fully prepared for the journey. We recommend an exercise regimen that gets your heart rate above 120 beats per minute, for thirty minutes at a stretch, four times a week. If you can’t do this much, do what you can - the more the better! There will be several opportunities on the course to go for long walks or ride bikes from one village to another. The better your condition, the greater the number of opportunities you’ll be able to seize.

WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT TO BUY ON THE INDONESIA SEMESTER:

  • Traditional Indonesian cultural artifacts such as masks, carvings, shadow puppets and paintings
  • Textiles such as sarongs and batiks
  • Jewelry
  • Traditional spices, palm sugar and other dried, importable delicacies

There will time to buy souvenirs at the end of the course, as well as additional boxes or bags for transporting the souvenirs back to the US.

PLEASE DO NOT BRING:

  • Too many books – they are heavy and do not last long in the rainy season. Many books are available for purchase in-country
  • Avoid dreadlocks and/or messy hair. Unkempt hair is not culturally appropriate.
  • Mobile phones
  • MP3 players
  • Any sort of electronic entertainment
  • Toiletries bigger than 3 oz
  • Bare midriffs (no stomach should show at all) or short shorts
  • Low-riding or long pants that drag; not culturally appropriate and a safety concern
  • Full size cotton towels; they are too heavy.
  • More than one pair of shoes and one pair of sandals (Please remember that your shoes must fit inside your backpack;
  • Jeans—heavy and will not have time to dry in the humidity and rain
  • Anything made of leather that you don’t want ruined

Boys: do NOT bring...

  • extremely low, hip-riding pants which show boxers / undergarments as it is not culturally acceptable

Girls: do NOT bring...

  • shorts or skirts above the knees
  • tank tops
  • low cut shirts
  • makeup

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Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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Updated Clothing and Equipment List

Jamie Woodall,Indonesia Semester, Spring 2011

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Indonesia Semester Clothing & Equipment List THINK LIGHT! You will have to put whatever you bring onto mini-buses, jeeps and boats and you may have to carry your bag for long distances. The lighter you pack, the happier you (and the rest of the group) will be! Pack your bag and then walk around the […]

Posted On

01/3/11

Author

Jamie Woodall

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