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And we have lift off! After thirteen weeks of an incredible journey and a lifetime of stories, our beloved students left Kunming this afternoon. Goodbyes were bittersweet as expected, but we are thrilled to have had the opportunity to spend the past three months with our eight young globally-mind citizens, and we look forward to hearing about their future endeavors. We are sure parents and family are greatly looking forward to hearing the stories and seeing the photos, and hope that our students are clearly able to expound on what a profound experience it has been.

We spoke to the student group in Hong Kong just before they made the connecting flight to Los Angeles, and wished them a safe return journey to their respective homes. We can't wait to hear from them in the coming weeks as they process and digest their grand journey along the Mekong.

Until soon,

Allana & Michael

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Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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Departure

The Instructor Team,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

And we have lift off! After thirteen weeks of an incredible journey and a lifetime of stories, our beloved students left Kunming this afternoon. Goodbyes were bittersweet as expected, but we are thrilled to have had the opportunity to spend the past three months with our eight young globally-mind citizens, and we look forward to […]

Posted On

05/12/10

Author

The Instructor Team

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The Mekong is the name of my song

almost 5,000km long

And you can take it from this falang

that there're friendly Hmong smokin from bongs

But don't get me wrong

Life here's not all about drugs and thongs

You've been at home scoopin salad with tongs, well ding-dong!

Wake-up call, a river's here, and it's mighty and strong

When all you hear is a name it may be hard to relate

But don't worry, sit back, and I'll try to educate

The Mekong provides food and water and irrigates crops

It's engraved in Asian culture and if its flow ever stops

some 100 million people in 6 countries will be seriously hurt

They'll lose their main source of protein, a way of transport, and valuable dirt

that helps fertilize soil, so it's important you know

the river's in danger now and we're the ones messin with its flow

Logging, erosion, flooding, chemicals, pollution

We bitch about the problems but no one knows the solution

Poaching, over-fishing, blasting, lack of research, and dams

make the issue so sticky we gotta use Pam

The level and quality of water has altered

Species like the Irrawaddy Dolphin and giant catfish have faltered

There is a regulating committee called the MRC

But the Mekong River Commission, with only Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam, is not all that it could be

I've come to believe future damming poses the greatest threat

along with global warming and ignorance, but dams seem like an easier issue to get

So I've said the big picture but let me hit ya'll with some facts

Pak Mun, Xiaowan, Nam Theun 2 are just a few in the dam pack

800, 32 thousand, 6 thousand displaced

usually minorities, and their compensation and resettlement's a disgrace

720, 4 thousand, 1 thousand MW

generate hydroelectric power that's exported and bought

by Southeast Asian countries, largely Thailand, and their big brother to the North

China's pushing for this development and is a formidable force

China's probably gonna take over the world but let's not get our panties in a twist

Just because some people in power are threatening a vital ecosystem doesn't mean we should put the whole country on our "evil" list

But all the dams on the mainstream are in Yunnan

and the government funds projects for blasting and building to go on

China says its dams prevent flooding and lift rural people out of poverty

but the poor actually reaping the benefits of dams would be quite a novelty

Due to politics it's hard for Southeast Asian countries to speak out

Even when exploitation of natural resources and expanding influence is what trade with China's all about

So China's flexing muscles while Southeast Asia's growing up - how's that relate to you?

It depends simply on what you learn and then with that what you do, But my lecturing is through

The Mekong is the name of my song

Almost 5,000km long

And you can take it from this falang

That there're friendly Hmong smokin from bongs

But don't get me wrong

Life here's not all about drugs and thongs

You've been at home scoopin salad with tongs, well ding-dong!

Wake up call, a river's here, and it's mighty and strong

But maybe not for long

Mighty and strong

But maybe not for long

Mighty and strong?

[post_title] => The Mekong Rap [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-mekong-rap [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-05-06 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=48609 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 395 [name] => Mekong Semester, Spring 2010 [slug] => mekong-semester-spring-2010 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 395 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 257 [count] => 152 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 22.1 [cat_ID] => 395 [category_count] => 152 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Mekong Semester, Spring 2010 [category_nicename] => mekong-semester-spring-2010 [category_parent] => 257 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2010/mekong-semester-spring-2010/ ) ) [category_links] => Mekong Semester, Spring 2010 )

Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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The Mekong Rap

Kimberly Kenny,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

The Mekong is the name of my song almost 5,000km long And you can take it from this falang that there’re friendly Hmong smokin from bongs But don’t get me wrong Life here’s not all about drugs and thongs You’ve been at home scoopin salad with tongs, well ding-dong! Wake-up call, a river’s here, and […]

Posted On

05/6/10

Author

Kimberly Kenny

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To add to the fact that our group is straight honey mooning right now, the E village was incredible. Just to get in you had to hike through snow covered pine forest, pink blossom trees, and hanging bearded moss. The village itself looks down into theYangtzeriver andis situated beneath mountains with a set of snowy peaks. Aside from a few bits of trash, the place had more natural beauty than any village i've seen before(we alsosomehow managed to catch a full moon while we were up there)...and the people were so loving. They shared their homes, a lottta potatoes, and much dance and song.. though they later demanded that we throw down for America. Yes, i mean to say that we had a sing off/dance off, which i won't begin to describe...We won the competition, much credit owed to Kim and Gabe, after a devastating performance by our opponents after they fell to poor organization and laughter in the final round. Also, i had to sing to a pretty sizable audience? Remember when i did choire, rough times. well, G. Love ended up pulling through for me on this one. Our three days went by like minutes; I'll miss the E village community very much and am so glad to have been a part of that.

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Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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My babys gawt sawwwce

paige montgomery,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

To add to the fact that our group is straight honey mooning right now, the E village was incredible. Just to get in you had to hike through snow covered pine forest, pink blossom trees, and hanging bearded moss. The village itself looks down into theYangtzeriver andis situated beneath mountains with a set of snowy […]

Posted On

04/30/10

Author

paige montgomery

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    [post_content] => The winter started off slow but picked up in a hurry. Late January brought ravaging snow storms with wind that could fly a kite higher than ever before. I huddled with my brothers and sisters as we waited out the storms, with images of the spring time filling our dreams. We were very optimistic by mid February, thinking that the worst was over. Little did we know Jack Frost was headed straight our way accompanied by an industrial fan!  On the night ofFebruary the 13th, as we settled in, the flame giving light to our dwelling began to dance as if it were on some sort of hallucinogenic drug. JackieBoy had arrived, and his fan's voltage level was cranked up toGnar Gnar Sick-Tu-Bra-Ha; that's bad! With a high pitched creekfollowed by a crash themajority of the tiling from the roof had taken flight. The candle went out in a flash, and before my siblings and I couldgrasp the situation, the remainingcover given by the surviving tiles was ripped from our clutches. The elements at this point had their pick as they peered down at us. We could donothing! We were at their mercy. From left than right my brothers were picked up and thrown into the sky, only to land kilometersdown the valley, where they wouldforever rest in atomb of snow. I dug deep into the dirt covered floor and held on for dear life! As fast as the nightmare had begun, it had ended. I had made it through the massacre, but sadly as I glanced around,more than half of my kin had been swept away never to be seen or heard from again.Spring soon pushed through winter's strong hold and with growing warmth along with spring showers I grew bigger and stronger. Today I am here telling you my story so that you know what happened that devastating winter. The most important thing that you should get out of my story, if nothing else, is that everyone has a rough patch in life. From that rough patch everyone has a learning experience, and from that experience everyone can sculpt their futures.  I was near death last winter, and now early summer my future is full of possibilities! Such as mashed potato, scallop potato, French fried potato, shoe string potato, hash brown potato, boiled potato, charcoaled potato, spiced potato, sometimes bread potato, and even noodle potato!
    [post_title] => In the Valley of the Potato
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Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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In the Valley of the Potato

Jonathon "Gnar Gnar" Luckett,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

The winter started off slow but picked up in a hurry. Late January brought ravaging snow storms with wind that could fly a kite higher than ever before. I huddled with my brothers and sisters as we waited out the storms, with images of the spring time filling our dreams. We were very optimistic by […]

Posted On

04/30/10

Author

Jonathon "Gnar Gnar" Luckett

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    [post_content] =>  Rounding the last crest of our hike to begin the descent towards our new home in the Yi Potato village, it feels as though we are stepping into another world. A thick expanse of pine forest inhabits the slope ahead, decorated with a swash of evenly-spaced pink Rhododendron trees. As invisible hand has come before us to liberally toss green-tea-ice-cream-colored grandfather's beard hanging moss over everything like tinsel on a Christmas tree. The snowfall that surprised us an hour ago has left its mark here, dusting the ground and the tree branches with a coat of wet, clean snow. Ou Yi guide gives a hoot downhill to alert his village of our imminent arrival, and we breathlessly make our way downhill, almost afraid to speak for fear of breaking the spell.
As we approach the village, we can hear a chorus of high-pitched women's and men's voices, first far-off and then closer and louder. There, at the edge of the village, they have lined up to welcome us with songs and wide smiles. I can hardly believe the beauty of it; the women are wearing their (everyday!) traditional attire of long, pink-yellow-green-blue block-striped skirts, colorful crocheted headdresses and embroidered vests, and the men are dressed for the occasion in black velvet capes and hats. We are each led to hop over a ritual cleansing fire and, with a marked sense of not being in Kansas anymore, we enter the village.

Fast-forward to our last night with the Yi people:
Tonight, just like so many nights before, the whole village is gathered at the women's center in the middle of town. Dinner has finished, and the courtyard is buzzing with languid activity: the men, children in hand, squat around the hot fire which forms the centerpiece of the scene; the women bustle around, finishing up the last dishwashing in the kitchen-hut across the way; the elders have staked out their habitual spots almong the perimeter, from where they can quietly blow their pipes and observe the scene; the foreigners play cards or chat by the fire.
Suddenly, the news spreads that the village has challenged our group to a dance/sing-off. With the challenge accepted, brainstorming begins for a high-energy line-up. Teams gather on opposite ends of the courtyard and the contest commences, at first hesitant but quickly building in strength until everyone, North American and Yi, is dancing, singing, rolling on the floor laughing with every bit of available energy. Our entries of "The Lion Sleeps Tonight," "I Will Survive," and my personal favorite, a medley of "Row, Row, Row your Boat," "What I Got," and "RESPECT" are gamely answered by beautiful, traditional, choreographed dances from our friendly opponents. Tonight, we are all one.

Throughout our time here, it has become more and more apparent that this place is far more complex than just a single village, isolated entirely from the rest of the world as I once thought. Outside culture permeates where a passable road cannot, and it strikes a sort of balance with the ages-old traditions here. Right next to the essential household fire sits a satellite TV. When the women's colorful skirts swish to the side, sneakers or soccer cleats can often be seen peeking from underneath. Traditional music is offset by strange techno dance jams, and all of the songs are played from modern speakers. The potatoes that are present in abundance at every meal are supplemented with factory-packaged spices from Kunming. Thanks to the last Dragons group that visited here, the villagers love to toss around their one frisbee.
This is a village in flux. It is gently pulled in one direction by the traditions that have been preserved for so long and yanked in the opposite by the blink-and-you-miss-it, 8%-annual-GDP-growth world of modern China. Already, it is clear that the village will need to adapt if it means to survive and maintain its way of life. Not so long ago, the Chinese government relocated three of the eight Yi villages in the area to lower-elevation areas because it was decided that they were not economically sustainable. Crop failures in recent years (due, in part, to irregular weather patterns possibly caused by climate change) demonstrated how dire the situation is here and pushed the village, with the help of a regional NGO to diversify its income. They have started planting medicinal herbs to sell for profit and began an ecotourism project (this is we we are here!) to gain some income from external sources. Still, a large percentage of the young, strong workers from the village have gone east like so many other young people in western China, to work on factories manufacturing goods for export to the Western Hemisphere. With no one to whom traditional skills can be passed, it will be tough for this village to stick it out and preserve their own unique way of life. [post_title] => Another world? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => another-world [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-04-30 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=48697 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 395 [name] => Mekong Semester, Spring 2010 [slug] => mekong-semester-spring-2010 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 395 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 257 [count] => 152 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 22.1 [cat_ID] => 395 [category_count] => 152 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Mekong Semester, Spring 2010 [category_nicename] => mekong-semester-spring-2010 [category_parent] => 257 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2010/mekong-semester-spring-2010/ ) ) [category_links] => Mekong Semester, Spring 2010 )

Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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Another world?

Heather Lyon,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

Rounding the last crest of our hike to begin the descent towards our new home in the Yi Potato village, it feels as though we are stepping into another world. A thick expanse of pine forest inhabits the slope ahead, decorated with a swash of evenly-spaced pink Rhododendron trees. As invisible hand has come before […]

Posted On

04/30/10

Author

Heather Lyon

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    [post_content] => This past week our group hiked to a village of Yi people in northern Yunnan after a brief stay at the Yunnan Eco Network site outside of Lijiang on Lasher hi lake where we learned about biogas as an alternative fuel methodand itsgrowing use among Chinese farmers. After braving a snowy trek complete with snowball fights, forests of pink rhododendrons, and mysterious fog our group clambered down the mountain side and into the village. Already old hands at home stays and meeting new people the members of the group got involved with village life immediately through cooking, potato farming, local games, dance, song, and much time by the fire at the village center. We learned of the Yi’s history andtheir uncertain future as they face risk of resettlement by the Chinese government if they fail to demonstrate their economic stability. GreenWater Shed, an Environmental group that our instructor Stu has close ties with, is working to improve their live hood by working with the village on major concerns. One of their major projects is working on building roofs strong enough to sustain the heavy winter storms that have struck the village in the past. Despite efforts it seems that the Yi culture is dying out as young villagers seek more lucrative jobs along China’s eastern coast where factories thrive pumping out consumer goods. As we said our goodbyes amidst tears on our final day it struck many people, especially me (gabe talking here) how quickly human bonds can be made even between people of opposite sides of the earth. We were all sad to leave the village but our beautiful hike back out raised our spirits.After a short bus ride we reached the bustling tourist town of Shangrila or as it is known to the locals ZhongdianThe town has taken the name from the James Hilton novel “Lost Horizon”. Heavily marketed, it is now sold as the gateway to Tibet and the closest this group will get to that beautiful plateau. As our group walked along the winding roads of Old Town we saw how Tibetan culture is being exploited for the benefit of Western and Chinese tourists. Ethnic Han Chinese dot the streets dressed in traditional Tibetan garb, Tibetan signs are misspelled with no care for grammar. Touristy souvenirs are sold from the beautiful old houses that still hold on to their traditional architecture. Over the past months we have held many a discussion about tourism and its positive and negative effects upon people and cultures. But on this town, it seems that the negative effects have quickly erased the feel of what Old town was like a mere twenty years ago. yARRRR
    [post_title] => Yar
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Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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Yar

Yar Montgomery and Yar Maletta,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

This past week our group hiked to a village of Yi people in northern Yunnan after a brief stay at the Yunnan Eco Network site outside of Lijiang on Lasher hi lake where we learned about biogas as an alternative fuel methodand itsgrowing use among Chinese farmers. After braving a snowy trek complete with snowball […]

Posted On

04/30/10

Author

Yar Montgomery and Yar Maletta

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    [post_date] => 2010-04-29 00:00:00
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I'm sitting in my white linen bed in the girls' upstairs dormitory in Dragon Cloud Guest House with Allana's small laptop on my crossed legs. Downstairs the boys are playing cards, Robyn is checking her email, and a handful of scraggly haired European boys with cigarettes are watching a movie called "Twelve Monkeys." We came in to Shangri-La by bus this evening, after a 4 hour hike down from the Yi village. We had a breakfast of spiced potatos and fried dough with sauce for the third day in a row this morning. We sang "Build Me Up Buttercup" that Stew translated as a goodbye song as we left the village. My host grandma and some of the other women were crying as they waved goodbye, even though we'd only stayed there 3 days. The Yi village was beautiful, and well worth the long hike through snow (snow! only a couple of weeks ago I was lying on the floor in my Ban Xieng Maen homestay house paralyzed by the afternoon heat) up in to the mountains to get there. Every morning we woke up to a view of snow covered peaks and mountain faces striped green and pink from old mans beard and rodadendren. On our first full day there a handful of us hiked up to just over 13,000 ft. to get a spectacular view across a deep gorge of Jade Dragon Mountain, which is about 16,000 ft. On our way back down wethrew a frisbeethrough sprawling meadowsscattered with carcasses and horses.We walked through what we agreed upon to be the Shire and Fangorn Forest, and took calendar worthy pictures of Jony lying atop flower petals. At night we danced with the villagers,connected by linking pointer fingers,in a circle around the mostly older men huddled around the fire in the community courtyard. We became particularly attached to one of the traditional songs, which is currently refusing to get out of my head. On our last night there we had a song battle with the villagers, which I think it is fair to say we won. Gabe rapped the Discovery Channel song, with Robyn and I as back-up singers, our finale was a medley of "Row Your Boat" in rounds and Sublime and Aretha Franklins "RESPECT," and I belted out "At first I was afraid, I was petrified..." with traditional American dance moves such as the lawn mower and shopping cart. It was one of my favorite nights of the trip. Twice we were able to watch the almost-full moon rise, and it was huge and bright and lit up the entire village. The people there were amazingly kind and wonderfully smiley; they seemed happy. The women wear traditional outfits of decorated vests and long colorful skirts and elaborate hats, and the men smoke home-grown tobacco with pipes. Most of the middle-aged villagers and teenagers had gone elsewear down out of the mountains to find work, so the population of the village was largely the elderly and the very young. There were plenty of cows, pigs, dogs, and chickens, and the weather was mostly clear but always cold.

Before coming to Shangri-La we said goodbye to Chris, and once we arrived at the guesthouse met up with Jake, another one of the China semester interns who will be trekking with us for the next few days. The students went out to dinner tonight, and afterwards enjoyed one of the best mugs of hot chocolate in the world. Realizing I'm not very prepared for the cold, I bought a Northface ski jacket, a hat, and a pair of gloves all for $45. Tomorrow the thing I'm looking forward to most is a hot shower. My face is sunburnt from hiking today, my lips have grown in sizedue to being chapped, and my legs are very sore. I'm exhausted, but happy andcertain that I'll sleep well tonight.

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Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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rolling up sleeves + Australian accent = too hot to handle

Kimberly Kenny,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

I’m sitting in my white linen bed in the girls’ upstairs dormitory in Dragon Cloud Guest House with Allana’s small laptop on my crossed legs. Downstairs the boys are playing cards, Robyn is checking her email, and a handful of scraggly haired European boys with cigarettes are watching a movie called "Twelve Monkeys." We came […]

Posted On

04/29/10

Author

Kimberly Kenny

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    [post_content] => During our stay in the Yi village, part of the group decided to hike up to a close peak to get a better look at the snowy peaks beyond. I was one of those people. Little did I know beforehand just how many times I was going to be amazed on that hike. The hike was steep. As we climbed further up snow began to dot the ground. We could hear the plit plat of melting snow from the trees. We were surrounded bylight pink and purple rhodedendrons. Green pines and mossy grandpa's beard surrounded us. This was my first experience of spring. No joke. What beautiful experience it was. I could go on and on describing the beauty that encompasses these mountains, but the scenery changed so drastically on this hike that it is necessary to move on. We reached the tree line fairly quickly. From mossy trees and fallen petals we now saw little shrubs and jagged rocks covering the ground. A ways ahead of us there stood a grazing horse. We trekked on. Soon we reached groves of trees that were also another type of rhodedendrons that had not bloomed yet. We were just shy of the June bloom that turns these normally dark green trees into bright splashes of pink and purple. We then reached an open field where we threw the frizbee around for a little while. A vulture soared over or heads, gliding on thewind currentswith finger wings. We pushed to the top. On the scraggly rocks we saw, in fullview, Jade Dragon Snow Mountain. The peak disappeared into the clouds. The clouds melted into the white snow that lay sleeping on the peaks. The dragon lay dormant. How many more beautiful things can I see in one day?
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Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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Jade Dragon Snow Mountain

robyn reeder,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

During our stay in the Yi village, part of the group decided to hike up to a close peak to get a better look at the snowy peaks beyond. I was one of those people. Little did I know beforehand just how many times I was going to be amazed on that hike. The hike […]

Posted On

04/29/10

Author

robyn reeder

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    [post_content] =>   Kunming has given a good first impression of China. The “City of Eternal Spring” is cool but not cold, the afternoon sky is clear, and at night pollution doesn’t prevent us from enjoying the stars. The city is huge, with a population of 6 million people, which is roughly two San Franciscos, or the whole of Laos. Our program house, which is also Stew’s (our Iowan China instructor who’s fluent in Mandarin, sports long hair and a beard that somehow doesn’t look sloppy, and has a hat fetish) apartment, is located near the center of Kunming, and is equipped with an eclectic library, large wrap-around couch, and roof-access. On our first night here we lit a Chinese lantern from the roof that we’d tattooed with both things were wanted to leave behind and wishes for the future. That night was also my nineteenth birthday, and one of the best birthdays I’ve ever had – nothing extravagant (if you don’t count being in China as extravagant) but I felt truly appreciated and noticed. We leave tomorrow for a community service project organized by one of the Dragons interns based in Kunming. In the past three days, we’ve listened to four very interesting speakers (a Canadian businessman speaking on development, a male Chinese teacher with strong opinions on the Chinese education system, an Australian working to learn more about Yunnans rivers and the current drought, and a female Chinese Christian numerologist who studied genetic engineering), begun what is sure to be a committed relationship with Chinese food (highlights: eggplant, fish in sweet-and-sour sauce, Peking duck, and Sichuan peppers that leave your mouth numb and necessitate slack-jaw; Allana’s description of the experience being like your mouth is stoned may be more accurate), and thoroughly enjoyed the variety of characters present at the parks here (including large groups of middle-aged men and women dancing to techno, men practicing some form of kung fu on a very intimidated bush, women doing tai chi, a line of women practicing a fan dance headed by one woman periodically shouting criticisms, tiny prim and pedicured squirrel-dogs, and people hitting random parts of their own bodies as a form of exercise). Being in Kunming gets me even more excited about studying Chinese in college. I love the bakeries here, the loving stage our group is in, acquiring my taste for black coffee, and the anticipation of my first ride on a sleeper train.
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Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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south of the clouds

Kimberly Kenny,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

Kunming has given a good first impression of China. The “City of Eternal Spring” is cool but not cold, the afternoon sky is clear, and at night pollution doesn’t prevent us from enjoying the stars. The city is huge, with a population of 6 million people, which is roughly two San Franciscos, or the whole […]

Posted On

04/24/10

Author

Kimberly Kenny

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Entering Kunming felt like the first day of Dragons, stepping out of the airportinto Phnom Pehn. Excitement, mystery, and ahh flooded my senses. Never once on this trip did I think that we would be in such a city. Neon lights blinding your eyes on most skyscrapers, parks every where with groups of older people practicing dance or tai chi, and traffic jam after traffic jam at almost all hours of the day! It's a very unexpected change which is also much appreciated. After so much time traveling from jungle-to-jungle, village-to-village, I feel like a young child entering my first big city with nothing but interest and curiosity, and I love it!

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Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

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Big Lights

Jonathon "Dakota" aka #10 Luckett,Mekong Semester, Spring 2010

Description

Entering Kunming felt like the first day of Dragons, stepping out of the airportinto Phnom Pehn. Excitement, mystery, and ahh flooded my senses. Never once on this trip did I think that we would be in such a city. Neon lights blinding your eyes on most skyscrapers, parks every where with groups of older people […]

Posted On

04/24/10

Author

Jonathon "Dakota" aka #10 Luckett

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