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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010


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The one thing I invariably think to myself every day, as I cram onto a microbus or tuktuk, is: "Thank god I'm not claustrophobic."

Then I think, "Thank god no one else on here is claustrophobic."

And then I realize, Oh yeah, some of them probably are. But there's really nothing you can do about it besides deal with it or take a taxi, because in Kathmandu, overly crowded public transport is just a way of life, as are the constantly blaring horns, gridlock traffic, and seeming absence of any sort of enforced driving rules.

I'd like to say I've gotten used to hearing horns sounding at all hours, that the cacophony of sound in the streets during the day has faded to background noise by now. And it has, to some degree - but some part of me still jumps a little everytime a horn honks and a motorbike swerves by unexpectedly. It's definitely hard to get used to, especially growing up in a society where honking is (mostly) rare and means (usually) something serious, and where a vehicle driving on the wrong side of the road is immediate cause for alarm.

It's also difficult for someone who's never really used public transport a lot before - I'm proud to say that I can handle New York City subways and can hail a cab just fine, but Kathmandu transport...well, it's a lot different, especially for someone whose main method of transportation in the past year has been a 2003 Volvo sedan.

Sometimes I think about how much of a luxury it's going to feel like, going home and being able to drive myself anywhere, after spending so long getting used to little three-wheeled, electric safa tempos and buses and vans packed to the brim - vaguely reminiscient of a can of sardines. Even the way people drive here is utterly different: there's no way anyone ever travels more than 40 mph, and it makes me feel like I take for granted even the smallest things, like the ability to cruise down a paved highway at 70 mph, music blaring and not worrying about enormous potholes or children running into the street or motorcycles zooming past me in the wrong lane (usually).

In the end though, I think I'm going to miss the hustle and bustle of Kathmandu when I get back to the orderly street signs and traffic regulations of home. However crazy and overwhelming the city here may be, there's something special about the way it all actually works. Never in a million years would I have thought that a city of this size could operate without stoplights and yield signs - but it does, due to some unspoken, widely-understood sense of who gets the right of way, how fast it's ok to go; and the simple beep of a horn, not often in frustration but as an alert. And that's the thing that's struck me the most: something that has only ever annoyed the crap out of me in the past has, in fact, probably saved my life on more than one occasion in Kathmandu.

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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Street Scene in Kathmandu

Amy Franquet,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

The one thing I invariably think to myself every day, as I cram onto a microbus or tuktuk, is: "Thank god I’m not claustrophobic." Then I think, "Thank god no one else on here is claustrophobic." And then I realize, Oh yeah, some of them probably are. But there’s really nothing you can do about […]

Posted On

03/18/10

Author

Amy Franquet

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There is only one title to which I aspire, and no, it is not that of an oscar-winner (although it was fairly disappointing to miss watching the recent annual evening on television). Instead, it is that of Nepali Idol. You now must be thinking that all I want in life is to conquer over numerous Nepali's for the recognition as the country's best vocalist, but once again this would be a false assumption. The Nepali Idol is the member of the dragon's group who knows the most about the country in which we currently reside, although truthfully information is only required with the three categories of General Facts, Politics and Religion.

After the fabulous viewing of "Sherpa: The Real Hero of Mount Everest," Nate enthusiastically led us to a fast food cafe where we were seperated into three groups, respresenting the masters of each category.

The masters were as follows:

- Fun Facts (Team We Are The Best..Duh): Montana, Nick and Hannah

- Politics (Team DuDe Chyaa): Deva, Dougie and Janet

- Religion (Team Chakras?)

To start out, each group created 12 questions in their subjects, the first of which were easy, the next four of a medium level, and the last three questionswere real brain-ticklers.Following the creation of our questions, each team took turns reading their 12 questions to the competing two groups, reading the answers and thereafter tallying up the points from each round based on the validity of the responses. Due to the permitted use of our Nepal Lonely Planet books during the construction of the questions, many of these were incredibly tricky, creating an atmosphere of sweating brows and high blood pressure. In fact the groups became so engaged in the activity that we became a source of entertainment and curiosity for all of our fellow cafe diners.

Sadly although the only explanation can be that everybody else cheated (because we were the best team..duh), my own team of General Fun Facts came in a dead last, followed by the religion group in 2nd and the politicians in a proud first.

Even if I still cannot refer to myself as a Nepali Idol, each of us was given the opportunity to demonstrate and realize just how much we know about this country only after a month of absorbing information. This activity also came as a great change of pace from our usual pre-lunch lectures, although the cafe cook had absolutely nothing on Pembladai and his incredible mid-day concoctions.

Maybe one day I will once again be given the chance to compete for the title of Nepali Idol, but for now I am sufficiently satisfied to have at least given it a shot. If it had been an actual singing competition then not even Simon Cowell could have disputed who would have come out on top; me...duh.

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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Not even the lonely planet knows what the Nepalese flag looks like

Montana Feiger,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

There is only one title to which I aspire, and no, it is not that of an oscar-winner (although it was fairly disappointing to miss watching the recent annual evening on television). Instead, it is that of Nepali Idol. You now must be thinking that all I want in life is to conquer over numerous […]

Posted On

03/18/10

Author

Montana Feiger

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Last Saturday, we attempted to decipher a palace.Results weremixed. Montana, Susannah, Dougie, and Ivisited Narayanhiti, the main royalresidence in Kathmandu. Only recently opened as a museum following the 2008 abolition of the monarchy and forced retirement of King Gyanendra, the palace supplies fewer answers thanquestions.

Requisitely massive doors conduct us into the main hall, where portraits of past kingsinspect usfrom high on the walls. Crowding through a strictly choreographed procession of rooms -- only 19 of the palace's 52 rooms are open to the public -- a shuffle of Nepalis, Indians, and a few Westerners peer around.

The succession of rooms dedicated to the visiting head of state soon outgrows our interest and we press onward more quickly, eager for the next room, hoping that this one will contain something of what we seek-- a hint of the personalities which not-so-long-ago inhabited this place. But the single-sentence placards sterily identify the purpose of each room and nothing more.

Finally we find something of more interest in our quest for new understanding -- the throne room, the king's study, and the bedroom of the royal couple. Here we pause for longer, searching the titles of the books, the sparse paintings, for hints. But the rooms feel emptied of personality; constrained; censured. I wonder to whose reign the rooms are reconstructed --that of the popular King Birendra, gunned down in the 2001 massacre, or his unpopular and lately deposed brother, King Gyanendra?

Many of the walls are strangely bare, and I wonder how much was removed from the palace following the transfer of power. The bedroom of the king and queen is particularly small and austere --it could be the master bedroom of any middle-class family. The fabric-covered headboard matches the coverlet of the king-sized bed that broods under a single painting. To each side is a nightstand and above,two shelves containing precisely arranged photographs.

The lack of ostentation confuses me. Am I simply importing foreign preconceptions at odds with the economic and historical Nepali reality? Am I over-analyzing, uninformed, or simply unworldly enough to observe properly? There is such little ostentation compared to the European palaces I have visited -- is this a concession to modernity, in keeping with the baldly '60s architecture of the palace?

Yet, any further ostentation would feel unbearably at odds with the povertybeyond the isolating walls of the royal compound.

Outside, we follow the signs to Tribhuvan Sadan, site of the 2001 massacre of nearly all the members of the royal family, allegedly by Crown Prince Dipendra. (The prevailing conspiracy theory, on the other hand,insists that Gyanendra orchestrated the massacre and framed his nephew, whose gunshot wound to the head kept him in a coma until he died a few days later).

The building was demolished shortly afterwards, and now only the stone outlines of walls remain. Grass sprouts around signposts morbidly identifying with large Nepali numerals the exact spots where each royal family member was killed. In the midst of the garden under the intense spring sunlight, I can get no sense of the tragedy that took place here. The scene has a surreal quality, ratherin keeping with the rest of the palace.

Articulating our reactionsto the palacehas been difficult. The excursion was another instance in which I only realized what expectations I held after the fact;a common theme in this last month. Some part was disappointment -- as Americans we have a tendency sometimes to romanticize, toaggrandize the concept of royalty -- we arrive with Western expectations born of fairy tales and eyes jaded by summer tours of medieval European grandeur. What greets us is another Nepal conundrum, another instance in which we are forced to reevaluate, to consider the head-spinning melding of past and present; West and East; knowledge and perception.

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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Notes on a Palace

Janet Chikofsky,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

Last Saturday, we attempted to decipher a palace.Results weremixed. Montana, Susannah, Dougie, and Ivisited Narayanhiti, the main royalresidence in Kathmandu. Only recently opened as a museum following the 2008 abolition of the monarchy and forced retirement of King Gyanendra, the palace supplies fewer answers thanquestions. Requisitely massive doors conduct us into the main hall, where […]

Posted On

03/17/10

Author

Janet Chikofsky

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“Snow Day”

A week or so ago, I think it was on a Monday (by now I can’t really be sure, a definite sign that time is moving far too quickly here) the sky became oddly still as soon as I reached home from my evening yoga session. As I came upstairs into my family’s kitchen, the lightning began- enormous flashbulbs illuminating the distant foothills faster than my eyes could register. The thunder soon joined in, and for every explosion of light there were at least two ear-splitting claps of unabashed noise. The light and the sound came more frequent and more hard than any thunder and lightning storm I’d ever seen, and while my body tensed up, preparing inwardly for some headline-dominating natural disaster, my family calmly braced for the storm by shutting all the windows and doors.

There was no power but we didn’t need any, for every flash was like the sudden appearance of a helicopter searchlight above our house. For a split second, through the windows, I could see everything, farther than the afternoon smog ever allows my vision to roam. Over and over the incredible sound, and I simultaneously shook and praised the earth in awe of it being able to create such a chilling, humbling event.

Then, stillness, and the rain started. It was like glass shards, big, sharp, cutting through the darkened sky. Things were hectic now, and I sat, not knowing quite what to think, while my family’s voices turned to shrill shouts to cut through the horrid symphony. I didn’t think it could rain any harder but it did and our hallways filled up with the water that cleared the week’s buildup of pollution and thick, sticky dust from the valley’s atmosphere, both terrifying and refreshing. We waded through the freezing rivers that were now our hallways, closing bedroom doors, rescuing candles and shoes that threatened to set sail. The sound amplified and it became violent as water droplets hardened and marbles began dropping from the sky. They threatened to shatter each and every one of our windows, to punch holes through our roof as if it were paper. The sky outside became white and none of us spoke, everyone’s eyes turned inwards towards the lone candle lighting our kitchen table. I could hear screams outside and shivered, not knowing if they were out of fear or shock or amazement or if terrible destruction was taking place outside and by the time the hail ended we would re-emerge to a post-Apocalyptic, ice-age Kathmandu.

And then, slowly, they quieted down and became soft again, back to their fresh and dewy origins. Without a word, my brother opened the window to show me the scene outside. I tentatively came close, afraid of what I might see. The streets were completely white. The soccer field below our house was blanched as if a gentle snowdrift had just blanketed the city. And quickly, they came out; the boys and girls both older and younger than me, and began laughing and screaming, yelling for one another as they tossed handfuls of ice at their sisters and brothers and friends. Some crouched in the middle of the white street and built volcanoes out of hail. I thought of snowmen and how frustratingly technical they are, and hail volcanoes seemed suddenly a very practical and clever alternative. It was beautiful and the snow remained overnight, disguised as hail, hiding the garbage piles and potholes beneath frigid embrace.

I don’t believe I have experienced a country until I have sat through one of its storms. One of its blinding, ear piercing, terrifying forceful storms. In Kenya, I sat huddled with my homestay partner in the doorway of our mud hut while lightning seemed to rise in one spindly crack from the ground only 20 feet ahead of our shoes. Later we would claim it struck our yard, but upon examination that may have been an exaggeration. In South Africa I stood on the lurching deck of our cage diving boat as gale force winds dumped freezing water down our jackets and work boots. And here in Nepal, I played in the hail on the roof with my sister and brother and built a miniature Mount Everest while we all laughed at the sheer ridiculousness of it all.

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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Hailstorm!

Alex Kryzanowski,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

“Snow Day” A week or so ago, I think it was on a Monday (by now I can’t really be sure, a definite sign that time is moving far too quickly here) the sky became oddly still as soon as I reached home from my evening yoga session. As I came upstairs into my family’s […]

Posted On

03/17/10

Author

Alex Kryzanowski

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“Do Not Kick the Cow.”

Life is painful. We enter this world crying, because we have been once again born into the cycle of suffering that, as B.L. Shrestha explained to our class during his lecture, we can only escape once we have become unified with God. As we grow old we once again experience pain: the physical pain of our bodies deteriorating, the emotional pain of losing those we have known and loved throughout the span of a lifetime and preparing for our own selves to cease to exist. Avoiding this pain, Shrestha explained, is the ultimate goal of Hinduism, and the only way one can escape the cycle is to become one with God. Though Shrestha’s lecture was an overview of Hinduism, it also provided a better understanding as to the goals of all religions, despite the path they choose to take.

Hinduism is one of the oldest religions in the world. Unlike Christianity and Buddhism, it has no sole founder, but is rather based upon a collection of philosophies and beliefs regarding how to live one’s life. Hindus accept many paths towards unification with God, and do not specify who exactly this supreme deity is. Hindus can choose to worship whichever of the many deities they like, and to me it is this freedom of choice that has allowed Hinduism to prevail and thrive for so long.

Shrestha explained that there are three main ways to reach God: the first being knowledge that the entire world is an illusion and all we see, including our bodies, will one day disappear. The second way is through karma, or service to humanity. Karma refers to one’s actions in this current life, and the belief that they determine how one will be reborn in the next. The third way is through devotion to God, and Shrestha emphasized that as long as one is devoted, it makes no difference which rituals are practiced or even how “devout” one is to Hinduism. These three concepts, however broad, create the foundation for Hinduism and the message of kindness they carry is meant to benefit not only ourselves but those around us as well.

Although there are said to be thousands of Hindu deities, the three primary deities that have been agreed upon by Hindus are Brahma, the creator, Vishnu, the preserver, and Shiva, the destroyer. And despite having few “rules,” Hindus in general do not consume beef, as the cow is the incarnation of the goddess Laxmi. Shrestha made sure to inform our class that if we see a cow in the streets of Nepal, to leave it be. “Do not kick the cow,” he told us sternly. “That won’t be tolerated.”

Something to keep in mind next time the urge arises.

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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Hinduism

Alex Kryzanowski,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

“Do Not Kick the Cow.” Life is painful. We enter this world crying, because we have been once again born into the cycle of suffering that, as B.L. Shrestha explained to our class during his lecture, we can only escape once we have become unified with God. As we grow old we once again experience […]

Posted On

03/17/10

Author

Alex Kryzanowski

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Last Thursday, our group decided to take the morning off from language classes to go see a documentary on the lives of Sherpas. The documentary was a fund raiser for this man who plans to climb Everest ( I forgot his name!) His is Nepali and for the last 11 years has been traveling around different countries, gathering flags of the countries, as a peace movement. He plans to put up all 105 flags on the summit of Everest.

The Sherpas are the true heroes of Everest. They were originally only agricultural highlands people but as modernization hit their far region, discovered the financial security in becoming trekking guides. The Sherpas are essential to every summit team attempting Everest. They are the ones who work ahead of the teams, setting safety ropes and ladders. They also carry the majority of a teams gear and trek ahead to set the different camps. Sherpas have naturally high acclimatized bodies and can handle less oxygen better than westerners. From a season of leading treks, a sherpa earns about $4000-$5000 US. This is what their familys’ are supported on for an entire year. This is such a high risk occupation. Many of the sherpas in the documentary explained how they feel trapped in this career because if they decided to stop being trekking guides, the alternative occupations have such a lower wage. They would be forced into poverty or be forced to move to an urban area where work is more available. The emotional toll this has on the entire family is immense. The families have no word of their husbands or brothers safety for three months unless someone from base camp descends to the lower valleys. It is a great honor if a sherpa reaches the summit and becomes a respected figure in the community. Still they climb, leading trek after trek. Sherpas are usually very spiritual people and must hold a huge ceremony at base camp before attempting the summit. Everest is a goddess to them and they must ask her permission if they can climb to the summit. This documentary was very interesting to watch because of the perspective it gave of the sherpas. Their lifestyle is unlike any and I have such a greater respect for what they do and all that they risk. [post_title] => Sherpas - The True Heroes of Mount Everest [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sherpas-the-true-heroes-of-mount-everest [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-03-17 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=48906 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 397 [name] => Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010 [slug] => himalayan-studies-semester-spring-2010 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 397 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 257 [count] => 117 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 22.1 [cat_ID] => 397 [category_count] => 117 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010 [category_nicename] => himalayan-studies-semester-spring-2010 [category_parent] => 257 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2010/himalayan-studies-semester-spring-2010/ ) ) [category_links] => Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010 )

Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Sherpas – The True Heroes of Mount Everest

Hannah Oblock,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

Last Thursday, our group decided to take the morning off from language classes to go see a documentary on the lives of Sherpas. The documentary was a fund raiser for this man who plans to climb Everest ( I forgot his name!) His is Nepali and for the last 11 years has been traveling around […]

Posted On

03/17/10

Author

Hannah Oblock

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We started to learn about the different ethnic groups of Nepal last week. Each of us was asked to research a different ethnic group and prepare a 5-7 minute presentation to share with the group. My first impression of the ethnic groups was that they all have intertwining rituals and customs. It’s very amazing to be walking down the street and notice some characteristic of a stranger which identifies them with their ethnic group.

My ethnic group was the Newar. They are the indigenous people of the Kathmandu Valley. The Newar are the sixth largest ethnic group, representing 5.48% of the population. Their common language is Nepal Bhasa which is more commonly referred to as Newari.

Until the unification of Neapl, all people who had inhabited the valley at any point of time were either Newar or were progenitors of Newar. Newar history corollates with the history of the Kathmandu Valley. According to the Swayambhu Purana, a mythical scripture, the Kathmandu valley was a giant lake called Nagadaha until the Bodhisattva Manjusri, with the aid of a holy sword called Chandrahrasa, cut open a part of southern hill of Kachchhapala. It then cut open the Gokarnadaha and drained the giant lake, allowing humans to settle the valley.

The Newar maintain a highly literate culture and their members are prominent in every sphere from agriculture, business, education, government administration, and the arts. The city of Bhaktapur is largely the product of Newar architects, artisans and sculptors. Newar practice both Hinduism and Buddhism. Around 84% are Hindus, and 16% are Buddhist. The Newar music consist of mainly percussion instruments, string instruments are very rare. The typical Newar cuisine consists of beaten rice, choila, different beans, spiced potatoes, kachila, and spinach.

Newar culture is very focused around the different festivals and rituals throughout the year. One of the more important festivals is Gunhu Punhi. During the nine day festival, Newar men and women drink a bowl of sprouted mixed cereals and offer food to forgs in the farmers’ fields. On the second day, people who have lost a family member in the past year dress up as cows or anything comical and parade through the town, a ritual carried by a king to show his queen that not only his son died but other people die too. The last day of Gunhu Punhi is Krishnastami, birthday of lord Krishna, an incarnationof lord Vishnu. A lof of Newar festivals mark specific life cycles. [post_title] => Ethnic Groups of Nepal [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => ethnic-groups-of-nepal [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2010-03-17 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=48907 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 397 [name] => Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010 [slug] => himalayan-studies-semester-spring-2010 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 397 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 257 [count] => 117 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 22.1 [cat_ID] => 397 [category_count] => 117 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010 [category_nicename] => himalayan-studies-semester-spring-2010 [category_parent] => 257 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2010/himalayan-studies-semester-spring-2010/ ) ) [category_links] => Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010 )

Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Ethnic Groups of Nepal

Hannah Oblock,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

We started to learn about the different ethnic groups of Nepal last week. Each of us was asked to research a different ethnic group and prepare a 5-7 minute presentation to share with the group. My first impression of the ethnic groups was that they all have intertwining rituals and customs. It’s very amazing to […]

Posted On

03/17/10

Author

Hannah Oblock

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While many of us assumed we would be obtaining a rich cultural experience here in Nepal, and exploring a field called anthropology, many of us hadn't had a proper introduction to the subject. Luckily, our thoughtful instructors arranged a visit from Krishna-Ji Bhattachen, an anthropology professor from Tribuhan University here in Kathmandu, to clue us in. Many interesting facts and points were brought up, and we came away a better understanding of a field we will continue to explore over the next few months.

SO- what is anthropology? The study of culture may seem like the obvious answer, but further exploration brought up something more surprising. It is, according to Krishna-Ji, a "comprehension of the self by the detour of the comprehension of another." Many if us felt compelled by this answer, due to the fact that we have begun to learn so much about ourselves by simply being in and exploring a different culture.

We also were given a glimpse into the various research and ethonographic methods that exist within the field. Research and preliminary information are key, as well as participant observation. Mapping, data analysis and other observations are important as well, but Krishna-Ji also emphasized one more factor: interest and determination in the subject and culture. Without the passion, such as the one our mentor showed for his past research projects, it is not easy, and sometime impossible, to work within this field.

We are all looking forward to our homestay in Chaukati, where we will be able to apply the ethnographic methods we have learned about and have the opportunity to dive deeper into a culture we are all extremely passionate about.

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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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So, What is Anthropology?

Katey Parker,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

While many of us assumed we would be obtaining a rich cultural experience here in Nepal, and exploring a field called anthropology, many of us hadn’t had a proper introduction to the subject. Luckily, our thoughtful instructors arranged a visit from Krishna-Ji Bhattachen, an anthropology professor from Tribuhan University here in Kathmandu, to clue us […]

Posted On

03/15/10

Author

Katey Parker

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Happy Birthday, Deva and Susanna!

In honor of our two birthdays this week, we celebrated with chocolate and carrot cake, laughter, presents, a cinnabun hug, and a group-share: what everyone is thankful for.

Deva wanted to start us off and thanked the group. She explained that she felt that there was no pressure to be anything but herself.

Susanna expressed she was grateful to the staff of the program house for their cooking and attention, reminding us to expand our notions of our community.

The depth of the comments and the gratitude that emanates from the group are moving. This is a unique group and for our part, we feel fortunate to be part of their experience.

Namaste,

Nate, Shannon, and Sweta

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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Happy Birthday!

Instructor Team,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

Happy Birthday, Deva and Susanna! In honor of our two birthdays this week, we celebrated with chocolate and carrot cake, laughter, presents, a cinnabun hug, and a group-share: what everyone is thankful for. Deva wanted to start us off and thanked the group. She explained that she felt that there was no pressure to be […]

Posted On

03/14/10

Author

Instructor Team

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This week students were introduced to Sita Ram Baba, an ascetic, and asked him questions while Sweta provided translation. On Sunday we visited Pashupatinath, where students were exposed to cremations and for the first time, to an open-air ritualistic handling of death.

We will let our students share their thoughts about what these activities instilled in them. Here are some photos of us with the baba and our excursion.

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Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

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Babas and Cremation

Instructor Team,Himalayan Studies Semester, Spring 2010

Description

This week students were introduced to Sita Ram Baba, an ascetic, and asked him questions while Sweta provided translation. On Sunday we visited Pashupatinath, where students were exposed to cremations and for the first time, to an open-air ritualistic handling of death. We will let our students share their thoughts about what these activities instilled […]

Posted On

03/10/10

Author

Instructor Team

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