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    [post_content] => Yesterday the group went out with Katie and Lexi to a Hot Springs Spa center. We hung out and talked while soaking in the hot springs, relaxing our muscles and enjoying the amazing Kunming weather. We each got to have one free extra with our entry fee. Our choices were: a toenail clipping, a backscratch, a foot massage, or a dip in a pool with fish that eat your dead skin. I chose the fish pool. The fish in the pool are very small, most of them were half the size of my pinky. You sit or recline in the water and allow the fish to swarm your skin. The fish love feet, elbows, and hands the most. I am normally not very ticklish but I was howling with laughter for the first ten minutes I was in the pool because the fish nibbling tickled so much. It doesn't hurt at all but the fish nibbles feel very light. My feet would twitch involuntarily and the fish would scatter as a result. You can even stick your face and ears in, but that was a bit too much for me. There were so many fish covering my hands and feet that at some points I couldn't see my skin anymore. Shaw had fish diving into his belly button and Lauren had some bite her lips in a friendly fish kiss. I had heard of this treatment before, but had never had a fish bite that didn't hurt. I lovedit and didn't want to leave but all great things must come to an end. 
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China Semester, Spring 2009

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Eaten alive by Fish

Stephanie Walsh,China Semester, Spring 2009

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Yesterday the group went out with Katie and Lexi to a Hot Springs Spa center. We hung out and talked while soaking in the hot springs, relaxing our muscles and enjoying the amazing Kunming weather. We each got to have one free extra with our entry fee. Our choices were: a toenail clipping, a backscratch, […]

Posted On

05/6/09

Author

Stephanie Walsh

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Traveling in China is interesting, tiring and keeps you on the edge of your seat, sometimes literally. Our group boarded many buses (some 20 hours long) on this travel portion of the trip, to get to our final destination of Mei Li Snow Mountain. "Mei Li" in English means 'beautiful', which this glacial mountain certainly was. The road there was a winding, bumpy road, and the first night found us spending the night at a rural hostel, much like the homes in the Naxi Village, all those weeks ago. When we arrived at the base of Mei Li Snow Mountain, a 7 hour hike uphill awaited us. The high altitude made it hard for certain members of our group to hike quickly up the hill, without stopping every couple of minutes. Breathing was impaired, at a high peak of 3600 meters, slightly less than half the altitude of Mount Everest (which is 8000 plus meters high).

The village at the base of the large mountain was lush, green, and beautiful. Hidden away in a valley surrounded by mountains, life in the countryside seemed peaceful and easy. The inhabitants live according to nature, using the glacial stream to do laundry and dishes, and grow their own vegetables. Anything else they need has to be sent up from the other side of the mountain on pack mules. Everything they sell and own also reaches them in this fashion. This lifestyle seemed unbelievable to me; there was no real sense of time, or a need to rush through the day. There is no cell phone reception, although they do own televisions, so phones are not a distraction from the surrounding scenery. The majority of businesses being run throughout this mountain and in the valley are tourist related: hostel owners, snackshop owners, and horse/mule rental stations.
This mountain town was by no means wealthy, but there was a certain simplicity to it that I found extremely appealing. Fashion is not a ruling factor of your life; you can go days without showering, and still feel fairly clean due to the pleasant weather. The villagers live simple lives, cooking and doing laundry, tending to their animals, going for long walks, and just spending time with their families. Here, tucked away in the crevace of mountains, these people know and uphold what is truly important in life. This portion of the trip therefore held no real issues that I found shocking or bothersome, unlike problems I had come across in the bigger cities of China.

One thing I did notice, however, is the difference between those who live in the Mei Li Snow Mountain region, and those who are merely visitors. While there is no structured "social divide" among Mei Li Snow Mountain inhabitants, the gap between the wealthy tourists and the commoners is fairly noticeable. Looking upon the tourists, who are either foreigners or Asian travelers, they are clean and dressed in fashionable clothing. On first glance at the people of Mei Li, however, one sees slightly dirty, ragged humans, with the look of someone who has worked hard all their life. Place the common people of this mountain next to their clients on horseback, and they look like people of 2 different countries. Which, to some extent, they are. The mule owners, with darker skin and facial hair, are mostly Tibetan, and tower over their shorter Chinese counterparts.
Although I did not notice any extreme bad treatment of the Tibetan farmers, I did note that they were shunned in some areas, looked down upon as low-class. One of our nights camping, two Tibetan mule owners walking by our tents stopped to help us start our campfire. One took out his large Tibetan knife, which the men in this area carry around as commonly as cell phones, and began slicing logs into smaller twigs. They sat with us, warming their hands, and chatting about their lives. The other man said that they were not welcome to the fire in one of the nearby homes because they were too poor. They shrugged it off like it was no big deal, but I found it strange that they were treated like this. They are understandably used to it, because their clients on horseback, as far as my observations allowed, do not converse with them. The horse guides speak in Tibetan, or sing traditional songs to pass the time going up and down the mountain. My guide in particular, a very sweet young man, was shocked when I first began speaking to him. Whether this was because I was white or simply because somebody wanted to communicate with him, I don't quite know. However, it was nice to see him smiling and chattering away happily, like someone who hasn't been allowed the opportunity to talk in a while.
Mei Li Snow Mountain is a exquisite yet mysterious place. Everything seems in order, life is birds chirping and green meadows, and yet the men who travel through this area, the very men who provide most of the business to the people of Mei Li Valley, are (in some cases) shunned and looked down upon. Strange how in such a paradise, unrest still exists. I guess no matter where you go in the world, people will be viewed and treated differently. I myself should know this by now, from experience as the "white minority" here in China.
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China Semester, Spring 2009

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The flaws of ‘Beautiful Snow Mountain’

Amira Fulton,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

Traveling in China is interesting, tiring and keeps you on the edge of your seat, sometimes literally. Our group boarded many buses (some 20 hours long) on this travel portion of the trip, to get to our final destination of Mei Li Snow Mountain. "Mei Li" in English means ‘beautiful’, which this glacial mountain certainly […]

Posted On

05/6/09

Author

Amira Fulton

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The last few weeks of our trip have gone by pretty quickly. After our group split, two weeks seems like only a few days. The group that I was in chose to do a more physical oriented trek instead of the other group who decided they wanted to invest more time in culture. We hiked Emei Shan, walked around Le Shan, and finally made our way to Meili Xue Shan.

Meili Xue Shan was the main portion of our trek. We didn't go directly over Meili mountain but we were hiking in that mountain range. The mountain we climbed stood 3,600 meters above sea level. As far as I know, this is the highest I have ever been.

The trek up the mountain was pretty difficult. I am not a person with very much hiking experience so this was something that was definitely out of my comfort zone. Thankfully, we took it slow and stopped as needed and had a good time walking up as well. I also found that making mini-goals for myself while I went up the mountain were essential to me finishing the climb. I would look up the path and pick a point where I would tell myself I needed to get to before I could stop and take a break. It worked out pretty well.

When we got to the top of the mountain, almost every tree was covered in Tibetan prayer flags. It was beautiful. It was also really interesting as well. It was almost like you were walking through a covered bridge of all of these colorful flags that are welcoming and celebrating your accomplishment of reaching the top.

We got to a little rest area that was close to the top where we had some very interesting conversations with some of the men who worked there, whether as guides or it was their hang out spot. After about a 10 minute break we decided to say farwell to our friends and proceed down the mountain.

Compared to up hill, down hill was a piece of cake. We didn't stop as much which made us go faster and since we were able to see our campsite, we had more of an incentive to get to the bottom of the mountain.

Once we got there it was a huge relief and we all felt really accomplished. I took a moment to turn around and look back at the highest mountain I have ever climbed and felt pretty good about myself.

We were all excited about camping and sleeping and cooking outdoors and then.... it started to pour. A sprint back to our tents is how we finished our day full of achievements.

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China Semester, Spring 2009

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Meili Snow Mountain

Erica Davidow,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

The last few weeks of our trip have gone by pretty quickly. After our group split, two weeks seems like only a few days. The group that I was in chose to do a more physical oriented trek instead of the other group who decided they wanted to invest more time in culture. We hiked […]

Posted On

05/4/09

Author

Erica Davidow

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Hey Everyone! I am currently writing to you from Qinghai province (with Mark and Kelly),known sometimes as the "wild west of china," for more than just its leftylocation. The leather-skinned people, the wide, blustery streets, the large and empty buildings of the towns we pass through, all make thisplace seem like it is on the edge of something, a last stake-out perhaps, before the unknown.
It looks like Arizona or the Sierras taken to majestic heights. Everywhere huge crags of weather-worn rocks rise into the sky. There are rolling fields of dry yellow grass and green shrubsbending in the wind.In the distance, I can just get a peek of theturquoise (and strangely named) Yellow River.
We have had the chance to stay in an isolated tibetan buddhist nunnery, a place few foreigners everget to see, let alone sleep in. The nunsare so kind and welcoming and thequiet of the nunnery, hidden among the towering red rocks and mountains, is enough to make anyone feel at peace.
The altitude here is intense and I find myself breathing hard after climbing even one set of stairs, but neverthelessmy group set out the other day for the top of a small mountain near the nunnery, where a sacred temple stands. The scenery there was even more breathtaking. After growingused tothe lushness of southern China, it was hard to believe that I was still in the samecountry. Everything was dry and stained with that desert red.
At the top, we met a nun in her late twenties who had been living there for about a year. I think she had one of the nicest, warmest smiles I have ever seen and she just wanted to keep talking to us, despite our limited Chinese. She asked us about life in America and about how old we were while offering us food and again and again. She kept wanting to take pictureswith me, patting me on the back, looking me in the eye and saying "Beautiful, beautiful," in Chinese, smiling with that warm smile.
We stayed for hours, taking in the scenery, journaling, talking to the nun and a few families that had come to pay their respects, and just relaxing. Every time I looked up from my book or from a conversation, I just couldn't help but stare. What I could see, going for miles and miles, was some of the most beautiful scenery I have ever seen in my life, let alone in China.
To be able to see such a landscape, to have the chance to meet that nun at the top of the mountain, to stay with nuns and wake up to them chanting in the morning, to be out in China having the experience I was looking for, I consider myself truly, once-in-a-lifetime lucky.
Icelebrated my nineteenth birthday last week, waving goodbye to a year that has brought incredible change in me and in the world.The best gift Ireceived by farwasthe chance to beable to start this next year in my life in such an incredibly beautiful place, with such heart-warmingly kind people. I couldn't have imagined a better gift.
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China Semester, Spring 2009

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The Wild, Wild West

Lauren Bryant,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

Hey Everyone! I am currently writing to you from Qinghai province (with Mark and Kelly),known sometimes as the "wild west of china," for more than just its leftylocation. The leather-skinned people, the wide, blustery streets, the large and empty buildings of the towns we pass through, all make thisplace seem like it is on the […]

Posted On

05/2/09

Author

Lauren Bryant

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Where am I?
Geographically,I am 10,000 feet in the sky amoungst the mountains. Whitewashed temple walls embelished with vibrant artwork taper off into red dust before the landscape falls sharply into green grasslands speckled with herds of horses, goats and cows until they reach the river that cuts the valley in two. The wind is unyielding. It can be pleasant when mixed with rays of the sun and cause to add a few laters when clouds hide the blue sky. On a clearer day, snow mountains peak out from behind the clouds, as if from another world.
Where am I?
Lifestyle-wise, I have been living in and exploring monasteries and nunneries, where life is deceptively simple and the idea that these devout souls lead a magical existance are quickly thrown to the wind that wips around their robes and rubs their cheeks rosy. Monks ride away from evening prayer on their motorbikes and nuns chatter away on their cellphones.
Where am I?
In terms of time, the days seem to continue on forever, and yet time does not drag.I amkept constantly busy and only realize its slow quality whenI have a moment to stop, sit, and reflect on our activities. The sun rises earlier and sets later. When I am in the country,my mornings begin with the sounds of young nuns rising early to practice their chants. When I am in the city,my evenings end with strolls down the dusty tree-lined streets that have been decked out with multi-colored lights for the holiday. It feels almost like Chirstmas, andI sing carols accordingly.
Where am I?
I amsurrounded by people who look vastly different from the Chinese entities I have met thus far. We are in an area that is primarily inhabited by Tibetan and Hui (muslim) minorities. Traditional garb is the norm. Men's hair is longer and of a different texture. Women's clothing tends more towards functional rather than stylish.I have encountered so many incredible people. A nun that lives alone on top of a mountain welcomed us into her home and stuffed us full of seeds and peanuts. A Tibetan family that asked Mark to take a picture of them with Lauren and I and mail them copies. A monk whose fascination with technology earned him the nickname "modern old man" amoung his friends. A hostess in our favorite restaurant who plays with our hair and marvels at our watches and jewelry. A man who has studied Tangka (traditional buddhist artwork) painting for 28 years (he began when he was nine) and who happily lead us around his studio.
Where am I?
Personally, I am content. I love waking up every morning, excited to be here and anticipating what the day has in store. The mountainous air has a cleansing quality and I feel calm. Although speaking in a foreign tongue is challenging and constant travel is tiring, I wouldn't have it any other way.
Where am I?
I'm still trying to figure it out but, wherever I am, I feel incredibly lucky to be here.
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China Semester, Spring 2009

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Where Am I?

Kelly Ward,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

Where am I? Geographically,I am 10,000 feet in the sky amoungst the mountains. Whitewashed temple walls embelished with vibrant artwork taper off into red dust before the landscape falls sharply into green grasslands speckled with herds of horses, goats and cows until they reach the river that cuts the valley in two. The wind is […]

Posted On

05/2/09

Author

Kelly Ward

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I am so excited for our camping trip. We leave in 20 minutes and I am decked out in hiking boots, a camo belt, and I have a tin cup tied onto my backpack with a bandana. I am ready.

When I told my host family we would be leaving this evening for Meili Snow Mountain they pulled out an album of photos of them there in 1999. They looked the same except slightly thinner, or maybe it was just the baggy clothes. My meimei was suspicially absent and when I asked "Zai na li Molly?" my mama laughed and told me she was just a baby and could not climb the mountain. The photos of them were gorgeous as they were set amongst backdrops of stunning views, all places I can't wait to see. I got to spend less than 24 hours with my host family this weekend but it was nice to have something like my upcoming trip to share with them. They asked me to bring back photos of myself on the mountain and I look forward to it!!

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China Semester, Spring 2009

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Camping

Ilana November,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

I am so excited for our camping trip. We leave in 20 minutes and I am decked out in hiking boots, a camo belt, and I have a tin cup tied onto my backpack with a bandana. I am ready. When I told my host family we would be leaving this evening for Meili Snow […]

Posted On

04/25/09

Author

Ilana November

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100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105.....stairs, stairs, stairs. Our group is on Emei Shan, and instead of trails with rocks and dirt, I find myself climbing up endless stairs, along with hundreds of other (all Chinese) tourists. Yesterday we traveled all over Le Shan, also composed of millions of stairs. The walking paths are lined with trees, small pools, and stands selling tourist souvenirs, including stuffed monkeys on Emei Shan. Monkeys, the most important attraction at Emei Shan. We take pictures and laugh at them as we walk past them to the mountain's top. They are cute, seemingly harmless, grabbing their feet while they eat food thrown to them. When a particularly large one jumps a guy and rips his water bottle out of his backpack, however, we all run shrieking in the other direction. Vicious monkey. Haha then we are back to laughing at the monkeys as we (now cautiously) continue walking past them.

The weather on this mountain is nothing like the weather of Le Shan, just 24 hours before. It is freezing, and the main tourist business seems to be renting out large, puffy pink coats to tourists who have not brought enough clothing. I am included in this grouping of unprepared people, sadly enough only wearing shorts and a T-shirt. I succumb to buying gray/white striped leg-warmers, which look fantastic with the blue shawl I borrowed from an instructor. Yea, maybe in the 80s. But in China one seems to be able to get away with the most ridiculous outfits, mainly because the person next to you is most likely wearing a far more ludicrous collection of clothing.

The climb to the middle of the mountain is not so bad, and incredibly rewarding when we reach the cable cars we are to ride to the mountain's top. We buy our tickets and wait in line for close to an hour to embark on our gondola ride. The line is crowded with people pushing and shoving to get in front. I don't even notice, this is fairly normal in China in all settings of life: bus stops, grocery stores, even to cross the street. Only when I feel myself being swept away in a wave of tangled bodies do I start laughing and freaking out at the hilarity of the situation. One of my fellow students, usually so good at elbowing her way past pushy old grandmas on the bus, is literally lifted off her feet in this wild assembly of people. I whine to the man to let her through, after she is shut behind the rope, separated from our group. The crazy line continues onto the cable car ride, which is by far the fastest gondola I have ever been on. We virtually flew through the air, ending up on the top of the cold, windy mountain, gorgeous through all the fog and mist.

We stop for a road-side lunch of instant noodles and Chinese coffee cups, which I drink double of trying to fight the cold off. Then we continue our journey to the top of the peak, where a giant gold Elephant-Buddha head statue, yet another point of pilgramage stands. It is too foggy to see at first, but after 30 minutes of viewing the inside of the 2 temples (as well as the elaborate gift shop), the outside atmosphere was finally clear enough to see the top of the statue, much to our surprise and excitement.

The way down, we climbed the entire way, walking rather than taking any gondolas. It was oddly more work going down the stairs than it had been clambering up. We had plenty of time to relax on the many buses we took to get back to our hostel, at the bottom of the summit, 2 hours away. Overall, it was nice to be outside hiking, even it was only walking up and down numerous stairs. Almost as nice as it was to get back inside the warmth of a vehicle...

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China Semester, Spring 2009

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Emei Shan

Amira Fulton,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105…..stairs, stairs, stairs. Our group is on Emei Shan, and instead of trails with rocks and dirt, I find myself climbing up endless stairs, along with hundreds of other (all Chinese) tourists. Yesterday we traveled all over Le Shan, also composed of millions of stairs. The walking paths are lined […]

Posted On

04/25/09

Author

Amira Fulton

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As you may know, we have spent the past, I'd say, 2 weeks traveling through China, making stops in Sha'anxi, Sichuan, and have made a quick stop back in Kunming after which we will be going to Meili Snow Mountain. We got back to Kunming yesterday and everyone was happy to be here. We were also going to be spending the night with our homestay families, which was also a nice surprise.


After running many errands to prepare for our week long trek, I packed an overnight bag and left the program house very happy to see my family again. I was in a bit of a hurry because it was 6:45 and I had told my family I would be home around 6. (Carrefore is not the place you want to be going if you are slightly crunched for time.) I considered taking a cab home because I was so late but decided against it because I was not in the mood to spend 8 kuai on a cab where it would probably take longer to get home anyway.

I took my normal route home and walked through Green Lake. It had always been my favorite part of the walk because everything was so pretty and there are always a lot of people who just sit next to the water and take it in. It always made me happy to see that people took the time to just stop and sit and think. I always wish I had time to do that.

I continued walking and I got to the part of my walk that I knew I would be home in about five minutes. I was walking pretty quickly when all of a sudden I hear the usual "Hello!" Usually I just turn and smile and wave or sometimes I'll respond with a "Hi" and keep walking. On this particular occasion I turned and said "Hi" then I turned back to continue walking trying to get home as quickly as possible. I thought that I was done with the conversation. Apparently I was wrong because next thing I knew this man was walking next to me. He had sped up to keep up with me just so that he could talk to me.

He asked me "What country are you from?" I was so caught off guard that I didn't understand what he said at first. I slowed down a little and asked him to say it again. I told him I was from the US again I thought the conversation was over but no, he continued. I was shocked. He asked me how old I was, if I were a student, where I was studying, just the standard questions. At the end of the conversation I had pulled a couple steps ahead of him because I was relatively anxious to get home.

After the conversation had ended, I thought about it and the reason why this seemed so strange is because during the 6 weeks that I was living with my family in Kunming and everyday that I walked through Green Lake, no one had ever actually stopped and talked to me. I know that people in China are amazingly friendly and often times they just want to talk to you to practice English or because they are genuinely interested but I had always been with other people when it happened. This was the first time that I was on my own and it was a cool experience.

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China Semester, Spring 2009

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On the way home

Erica Davidow,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

As you may know, we have spent the past, I’d say, 2 weeks traveling through China, making stops in Sha’anxi, Sichuan, and have made a quick stop back in Kunming after which we will be going to Meili Snow Mountain. We got back to Kunming yesterday and everyone was happy to be here. We were […]

Posted On

04/25/09

Author

Erica Davidow

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    [post_content] => A few days ago we went to Emei Shan. We took a bus up as far as we could before walking a short ways to the cable car station. On the way we witnessed the infamous Emei Shan monkeys at their best. One jumped off the railing and stole a man's water bottle from his backpack before turning glance at us. Ilana accidentally looked it directly in the eye prompting the monkey to stalk towards us. Most of us emitted a screech before fleeing down a couple steps and huddling together. We eventually got around the monkeys and up to the cable car station. We bought tickets for the ride up and then waited for 45 minutes in three single file lines that were separated by metal barriers. Once we got towards the front of the line we saw that the wait was not over yet. We still had to go upstairs and wait a little up there. Once we managed to get to the upper level of the building the metal barriers no longer existed. The mass of people were crushed together, myself in the middle. They only allow 100 people at a time onto the cable car, so once the ticket counters started counting the fight was on. People, especially the older generations, started pushing with a force I have NEVER encountered before. One silly man tried to block the way by putting his arm on the wall. My arms were pinned at my sides as I was lifted off of my feet and started floating forward.I could see the manwho was trying to block wasalso being carried by the crush. My only problem was that I kept on beingpushed towards the side and my coat repeatedly got caught on chairs. I was behind five people when they stopped letting people go in the cable car. The rest of thegroup were already on the other side. I told them to go ahead and that I would get the next one since Icouldn't see a way through the five people packed into a tiny space in front of me. Amira whined to the ticket man and eventually a nice woman decided to stay behind so that I could have a spot. And then before my very eyes there was just enough space for me toget past the five people blocking my way. I have no idea how they managed to make space, but they did. 
    [post_title] => Chinese lines (or lack there of)
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China Semester, Spring 2009

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Chinese lines (or lack there of)

Stephanie Walsh,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

A few days ago we went to Emei Shan. We took a bus up as far as we could before walking a short ways to the cable car station. On the way we witnessed the infamous Emei Shan monkeys at their best. One jumped off the railing and stole a man’s water bottle from his […]

Posted On

04/25/09

Author

Stephanie Walsh

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nearly a week ago, we spent a weekend working with children who had been relocated following the devastating chengdu earthquake of last may. our first day with them was very entertaining. we spent the morning and afternoon playing classroom games, like indian chief, duck duck goose, and telephone. one of the chinese university students, who aided us throughout the day, suggested that when a kid made an "error" in one of the games, they would have to perform in front of everyone else. thus, i was witness to a number of amusing and often well performed songs and dances. one young boy even showcased his blossoming basketball skills. i enjoyed our first day with the kids, but our second day sticks out as one of the best days of the trip.

the day before beginning our service, we used a portion of our trek budget money to purchase twenty soccer balls, twenty-one basketballs, three jump ropes, and a couple of pumps. we brought all of this sporting paraphernalia to the school on the first day of service, but the balls remained idle in the corner of the room throughout the day. the second day, however, much to my great excitement, we brought every single last ball outside.

we made our way down the dark stairwell of the school and through the similarly unlit hallway, and, like a schoolboy on the last day of school, i sprinted outside, giddy with the prospect of playing sports all morning. after the giddiness, which i almost certainly shared with every other kid there, had subsided, we lined up and were promptly organized into groups based on which sport we wanted to play. there were a number of other lao wei (foreigners), who were likewise volunteering and aided us throughout the day (they did most of the organizing, i did most of the playing).

for the first two hours, i played basketball. we did drills for a brief thirty minutes, and then began a couple of half court games. i found myself guarding one kid, who, by my best aproximation, stood a towering four foot six. we had become friends the day before, so when i ran screaming towards him every time he touched the ball, he merely smiled, and more often than not successfully passed the ball off. in kunming, my host family had affectionately referred to me as yao ming, so not wanting to forsake my namesake, every once in a while, i could not resist using my significant height advantage to score a couple of baskets. throughout the game, i was truly impressed by the sportsmanship of the young kids (there were no fouls, the score was not kept, nobody complained once, and the ball was immediately given to the opposing team after a basket was scored). however, do not let the last sentence lead you to believe that the kids did not play hard, because they played very hard. after the game ended, everybody thoroughly drenched in sweat, i was able to entertain the kids by dunking soccer balls and attempting, but ultimately failing, to dunk basketballs.

shortly thereafter, i made my way over to the soccer field. i did not waste anytime, and immediately joined in. my team fought hard, but we eventually lost a battle to a slightly more skilled team. they also had the added benefit of having the referee as their goalie. infer from that what you will. despite the bitter loss, i had just as much fun on the soccer field as i did on the basketball court.

the morning and early afternoon wound up around one o'clock, but i could have spent the entire day juggling soccer balls, trying to dunk, and playing any available game with the energetic kids. without question that day will rank among my favorite of the trip.

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China Semester, Spring 2009

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Confessions of a Sportaholic

Shaw McKean,China Semester, Spring 2009

Description

nearly a week ago, we spent a weekend working with children who had been relocated following the devastating chengdu earthquake of last may. our first day with them was very entertaining. we spent the morning and afternoon playing classroom games, like indian chief, duck duck goose, and telephone. one of the chinese university students, who […]

Posted On

04/24/09

Author

Shaw McKean

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