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Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008


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Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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Visions of India College Accreditation

Dragons Admin,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

Click link to the right for information regarding college accreditation.

Posted On

02/26/09

Author

Dragons Admin

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    [post_content] => A thought occurred to me recently: I miss India. I hadn't let myself think that yet. Since returning to the US, I've attributed my boredom and unhappy moods to jet lag and overall illness. Sitting in my apartment, I'd start feeling empty, alone, and unproductive. "That's just because I'm tired," I would think, or because I'm worried about getting a job or about my health or about college. But maybe, just maybe, I really do miss India. And not just the Ganga, the people, the bathrooms, temples, food, cows, bells, music, Bollywood, dust, or trees. Not just the sugarcane fields or, perhaps most obviously, my beloved group of Dragons. No, I miss the things that should have been easiest to carry home yet, of course, proved to be the hardest. It is what India showed me, taught me, and revived in me. I miss the person that she made me become, for I find myself forgetting even the basics of her lessons. 

So here I will try to recapture at least one of her fleeting wisdoms as they flutter like butterflies above my head. While many still remain out of my reach, I feel confident that one by one, perhaps at the most unexpected times, they will light onto my shoulder and quietly stay with me.

One shy butterfly that keeps trying to get closer is that of openness. I now am extremely aware of the reclusive New York (or in my case, DC) stride. I miss walking down the streets and looking people in the eye. In fact, I didn't think I'd ever say this, but I miss the stares; the blatant gawking akin to that received by a 60 pound octopus in a tank at the zoo during feeding time. I miss the random conversations people would strike with you, even if they did approach with such curiosity and fascination that you'd think you were painted blue. "Does she communicate like we do? Will she invite me to her hotel room like I see so many Americans do in the movies? Maybe she'll give me money or take me to America with her? I hope she doesn't start screaming or yelling or something. I bet she'll let me shake her hand." All of these thoughts- they're relatively innocent. They have benign intent, no matter how misinformed, ignorant, or juvenile some may seem. These encounters, I've found, are better than the silence I receive here. Here, you walk down the streets and no one looks up. They stare at their feet, at the sky ahead of them, on a building they are passing, on a blackberry, on a cell phone. Anyone who speaks is looked at with suspicion. Anyone who intrudes on the "I'm alone" bubble is instantly kept an eye on. We put on our guard, raise the walls, unroll the barbed wire. Any ease or wit or amiability is buried and we become perfunctory and robotic. Yes, I say we because now I too walk the streets in my own gated community. I forget to hold doors open, I walk quickly, horse blinders intact, and tap my foot if a tourist is standing on the wrong side of the escalator.

Here's an example: Just the other day, I was eating lunch at a popular mom and pop Indian eatery. It's a grab and go kind of place, a quick and easy bite to eat between meetings with a fast moving line and tables full of men and women in business attire. Anyway, I had nabbed a table outside and was sitting alone, getting ready to eat my "veggie tikka wrap" when a middle aged man approached, asking if he could share my table. I was very taken aback by this intrusion, but politely allowed him to sit while trying to make clear that this would be one of those lunches where I ate my food and he ate his. But, to no avail, he instantly opened with "So, do you come here often?" Really? Is this how it's going to be? My feminine "He's hitting on you!" alarms were all going off, so I blandly answered, "I used to." I realized my mistake. This gave lead for the question, "Why not any more?" So here we go. "I've been out of the country." Period. I take a big bite of my sandwich, slathered in hot chutney. It's not very good. "Where have you been? Somewhere around Europe?" He guessed. "India." I say. I'm still annoyed that he is distracting me from my mediocre wrap. He asks where I was, what I say doing there, blah blah blah. Then he asks what my favorite part about Varanasi was. My mechanical small talk brain stalls and suddenly grinds to a halt. I'm silent. "What am I supposed to say to this?" My small talk brain wonders. Slowly, but surely, my regular mind begins to tap on the side of my skull, saying, "Hey, did you forget about me, honey? Let me answer this one, theek hai?" And so I do. I let my regular brain take the reigns for a while and the chain link fences that my paranoid small talk brain put up begin to fall down. I learn that the man was born in the south and raised in Kolkata. I was too busy trying to be unfriendly and regain my hard shell of solitude to even notice his dark Indian complexion. He seems genuinely interested in what I have to say and about my experience in India. He tells me about a few temples around DC and an ashram that I didn't even know existed in Charlottesville, my home town. When I get up to leave, he doesn't even ask for an email address. While my petty small talk brain gives an exasperated sigh, my regular brain coolly recognizes how irrational and silly that part of my brain is. Together, we decide not to let him take control any more.

So how have I gotten back into this habit of shutting my brain off and running on city solitude mode? I thought I had learned to be open in India- to accept what came to me with open arms. I had learned to be curious- to not just stick to the main roads but to get lost in the alleys as well. I learned how to make my mind present- to watch everything and everyone and to approach all encounters with the fullest of heart and thought. When a rickshaw walla's pan filled mouth gurgled something incoherent, I strained to hear what had to say. I picked through his words to see if there was something I understood and if there wasn't, I'd give a warm smile, "Samji nahi," or, "I don't understand." Now I find myself tuning out conversations (even with those closest to my heart) and being politely reserved when it comes to speaking with strangers or new acquaintances.

Of course, sometimes I catch myself. If I find myself irritated at a crowd of tourists clumped in the middle of the street (thus obstructing my, "I've got places to be" pace), I try to slow down or maybe even stop completely. I try to remember how it feels to be a tourist; to be dropped into a completely unfamiliar environment full of new sights, smells, and sounds. You can feel excited, scared, curious, and alone all at the same time. In this fragile state, the locals (often unnecessarily rude to outsiders) can be intimidating and seemingly unapproachable. I try to smile, give a good restaurant recommendation, and, just for a moment, to see through their eyes. Oh- That's the white house. I guess that is kind of cool.

Being open, when you concentrate, is not that hard. You can make an effort to say please and thank you, you can look store clerks in the eye, or you can simply smile unabashedly at strangers as they pass just to catch them off guard if not for anything else. You can even concentrate on your tone of voice or add little phrases of enthusiasm to exaggerate your sincerity. (e.g. saying "Thank you so much" to the kid who refills your water glass at a restaurant as opposed to an inaudible "thanks.") It may sound silly, but its kind of gratifying and fun to be ridiculously kind. I'm hoping that if I keep making these conscious efforts, they will soon become unconscious and natural- just as they were in India.

So that is one butterfly that I've kept in my sights. I cannot tell you when, but, slowly slowly, I am confident that more will start drifting my way. Please share any butterflies that you may find- of old or recent memory. [post_title] => Butterflies [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => butterflies [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-06-06 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=54725 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 438 [name] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 [slug] => visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 438 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 259 [count] => 105 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 30.1 [cat_ID] => 438 [category_count] => 105 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 [category_nicename] => visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008 [category_parent] => 259 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2008/visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008/ ) ) [category_links] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 )

Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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Butterflies

Anna Caritj,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

A thought occurred to me recently: I miss India. I hadn’t let myself think that yet. Since returning to the US, I’ve attributed my boredom and unhappy moods to jet lag and overall illness. Sitting in my apartment, I’d start feeling empty, alone, and unproductive. "That’s just because I’m tired," I would think, or because […]

Posted On

06/6/08

Author

Anna Caritj

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When we were sitting in the LA airport, disheveled and dirty and exhausted from having traveled for 40 hours, it seemed completely crazy to look around and see the quintessential American family returning from Disneyland, beach-tanned blondes kissing their lovers, a sports team chowing down on hamburgers and beer. Anna summed up my experience when she turned to me and said, “I feel so out of place, but no one is staring at me!” Returning to my hometown has felt much the same. In many ways, it seems like I never left-my home still looks and smells the same, my dog still barks every morning at 5:30, the same cashier still works at the grocery store. And, I’m quick to get swept up in the crazy currents of our fast-paced lifestyles and to forget that I was ever gone. But, when I step out into the sunshine and take a deep breath of the summer air, I realize how different I feel, even if no one is staring.

One day, I was shopping in Godolia, the biggest market in Banaras. Weaving through alleys, I eventually stopped at a small store that sold lungis. “Kitne ka hai?” how much is it, I asked the shop owner, picking up a white cloth with a red border. The man answered me in Hindi, but I couldn’t understand him. He repeated. I couldn’t understand him. He repeated again. I couldn’t understand him. “I don’t understand! My Hindi’s horrible,” I finally said. He again repeated himself in Hindi, grinning enormously. I started guessing the price, throwing out random numbers while he repeated the number in Hindi. When I finally guessed “45 rupees,” he smiled. “Yes, but for you, 40.” When I was counting out the money, he asked me “What countries have you been to?” I started to rattle off a list of all the places I’d visited, and when I was finished, he said, “How is India different?” I fumbled in my mind, trying to think of a way to articulate the way the Indian spirit had moved me.
“Well,” I began, “in India, nothing is hidden. Everything-pain and joy, laughter and tears-is laid out right on the street. Like, in India, there are so many beggars-“
He interrupted me. “Yes, but there are beggars in other countries, too, no?”
“Yes,” I said, thinking of the bums I’d walked by for years in Boston.
“But,” he said. “people tell me that Indians are different. How are they different?” I could feel that he was, in some way, posing a challenge for me, and I was determined to meet it.
“Well, in India, family is very important. People’s lives are so structured around raising their children and-“
“And, did not your parents structure their lives around raising you?”
“Yes, well, I guess...I guess Indian people aren’t really different” I said, giving up on finding the answer he was looking for. But then, his face lit up with another grin.
“That’s right. Human tendencies are the same across the globe. America and India are not so far away.”

In the coming days, months, and even years, I expect to feel at least a little different, at least a little alienated because of the experiences I have had, not only in India, but throughout my whole life. So, I hope to remember the power of that man in Godolia who, in a period of less than 15 minutes, became an amazing mentor to me. Everyone feels alienated at some point. And, every shop-keeper, gas station attendant, waitress, and friend is waiting to connect with you at some level, whether it is through a simple smile or a rendition of their life story. So, to those dragons who have parted with their groups and are coming home from hot climates, to all the family and friends who are welcoming us home, to all the people we left behind in returning to America, remember that we’re really not so far away.

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Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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Not so far Away

Shannon Ward,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

When we were sitting in the LA airport, disheveled and dirty and exhausted from having traveled for 40 hours, it seemed completely crazy to look around and see the quintessential American family returning from Disneyland, beach-tanned blondes kissing their lovers, a sports team chowing down on hamburgers and beer. Anna summed up my experience when […]

Posted On

05/17/08

Author

Shannon Ward

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Found a hotspot and uploaded the last of the photos!

(They are memories already, really?)

Live them again if you're ready:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/seekingsol/sets/72157604054304404/

love,

xtina

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Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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Hundreds of New Photos!

Christina,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

Found a hotspot and uploaded the last of the photos! (They are memories already, really?) Live them again if you’re ready: love, xtina

Posted On

05/13/08

Author

Christina

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Dear Families,

After more than a few tears, we have officially said our goodbyes and put the students on their plane and way back to you.

We miss them already.

Please have their favorite meals ready.

with gratitude and love,

Christina, Slade and Bantu-ji

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Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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On their way! From us to you.

The India Instructor Team,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

Dear Families, After more than a few tears, we have officially said our goodbyes and put the students on their plane and way back to you. We miss them already. Please have their favorite meals ready. with gratitude and love, Christina, Slade and Bantu-ji

Posted On

05/11/08

Author

The India Instructor Team

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Disorientation has been even more disorienting than I thought as my watch broke yesterday and I just found out that we have one fewer night left than I thought. I feel lost in India, overwhelmed by my love and gratitudefor this group, this experience,andthis country and her people. We're spending our last days attempting to process our experiences,stuffingourselves too full with delicious food, and staying up too late being silly with each other because it's hard for us to imagine that we'll be far apart from each other in two days. We're all trying to fit as many final cups of Chai, meaningful talks, and trips to visit a nearby temple in as possible.
As much as I'm lost here in the craziness of soaking up as much of India as I can, I'm ready to go home. I can't wait to see my family and friends, sleep in my own bed, and quit being a foreigner. I'll miss this place and experience more than I ever thought I would, but I have a feeling that India is actually coming home with me in my heart.
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Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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It’s time to go…

Helen Woolworth,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

Disorientation has been even more disorienting than I thought as my watch broke yesterday and I just found out that we have one fewer night left than I thought. I feel lost in India, overwhelmed by my love and gratitudefor this group, this experience,andthis country and her people. We’re spending our last days attempting to […]

Posted On

05/9/08

Author

Helen Woolworth

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Hey Friends and Family!

I'm sure you'll all be relieved and happy to know that we have officially returned from the big moutains and although dirty, are all very safe and happy. Our adventures in the Himalayas were the highlight of the semester for many. Perfect weather graced us with pristine and jaw dropping views and we all walk away as smaller and humbled (by beauty) human beings.

The students are BUSY - especially as we spend these next few days cramming them with reflection excercises and transference matererials. So PLEASE be patient as we will be sending them home soon enough and are trying our (very) best to stay as present as possible for our last fleeting days together.

A few new pictures (of hundreds) are being uploaded as I type. The pictures are petty compared to that which we actually witnessed, but we hope they still provide a frame of which the stories (you're soon due to hear) can fill in with sighs.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/seekingsol/sets/72157604054304404/

Hold your breathe (and hearts) for just a few more days!

And thanks for trusting your dearest with us. We know all the reasons you love them.

in peace and with love,

Christina, Slade & Bantu

The India I-team

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Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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Safe (again) at Sea Level

The India I-team,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

Hey Friends and Family! I’m sure you’ll all be relieved and happy to know that we have officially returned from the big moutains and although dirty, are all very safe and happy. Our adventures in the Himalayas were the highlight of the semester for many. Perfect weather graced us with pristine and jaw dropping views […]

Posted On

05/8/08

Author

The India I-team

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Just as my Mata-ji in Banaras used to tell me, it seemsI have, "Spent the last two months too quickly." This past week in Varanasi- the one I tried to savour, to stretch like taffy between my teeth andfingers to make it last- did what last weeks love to do: it flew by like the fickle, hot,Banaras breeze.It also, rather then acting as a closure or as a time when I could say, "Bas" or "enough,"made me wish for another week. Or two more. Or thirteen. And while I did manage to savour it, why did this last week seem so much sweeter than the rest? Like the last bite of cake on a crumb-filled plate, I just want it to last. However, I recognize that attachment is unhealthy, unrealistic, and uncool in general, so here's what I'll do:rather than dwelling on the fact that I may not see Banaras or many of my new friends herein a matter of years, I will simply reflect. I will smile and remember the sweetness of this last week.
So here I go.
Start.
And then stop... because when I think of this last week... all I can think of is heat. 105 degree heat- like someone is constantly blowing a hair drier in your face. I think of coming home around1 pm to asealed up house- windows and doors tightly shut as it cowers behind taller buildings fromthe blazing sun. When my knocking finally echos into my sister's ear, she emerges, blinking into the hot sun to quickly unlock the front door and sulk back inside. After kicking off my shoes, I stumble in behind her, locking the door. The room is pitch black, the fans are on full blast, and my whole family is on the floor. "Aiye," my mataji tells me. Come. So I drop my bags, lay down on thecold stone floor and sleep for two hours straight.
However, evening time is a little more lively. My sisters study (its exam time and they are both very good students) and my mataji cooks. Her cooking is wonderful- some of the best sabji I've ever had. This last week it tasted even better, because for some reason, ever since Bodhgaya, I hadn't been eating at home.I would either have some activity at the program house (pizza included), I would have a cooking class, or I would go out for dinner with my friends. She soon began asking me "Are you angry with my cooking? My food and chai are missing you so much." I would tell her, of course, that I loved her cooking "but tonight I have this thing..." and again, Iwould eat out. However, this lastweek I decided thatthis was not such a good idea- that I should be spending time with my family whether I liked it or not.And I realized that I liked it. A lot. My mataji began giving me cooking lessons, teaching me myfavorite sabji or chutney. She told me all the spices thatI should buy to bring to America and where to buy them. She told me which vegetables were good for the liver and which spice soothes the stomach. I would tell her the English words variousfoods as well as give fascinating nuggets of information such as, "yes, you canbuy salt in America."
Aftercooking, I would eat and she would work on her saree. Shewas working on this one gorgeous blue silk saree for twelve days- sewing sequins and making it more fashionable in general.She would ask me my opinionof sequin patterns and constantly ask if it was looking nice. I imagine she has finished it by now, and is getting ready for her sister's wedding.
Here, sitting in Rishikesh, I remember the day I left Banaras and how my love for my host familyfinally boiled over. It was as I walked out the gate with mypack, after giving my mother and sisters hugs (the first intimate touch we had ever exchanged), and watching their eyes well up with tears. I told my mata-ji, "Thank you forbeing my mom-" and that set me off. I cried,gave more hugs, and continued cryingall the way to the program house.
Right now, I amnot sad to be away from Banaras. I am excited to be traveling, to be seeing more of India, and to being living in a little more luxury (can you believe ourlast three trains have been air conditioned?). Rishikesh is gorgeous and it is wonderful to see the mountains again. Our whole group is happy to be together and is stoked for theadventures ahead of us. However, I've found a new appreciation for my home in Banaras, looking back. Of course, I can missthe thousands of temples(no, Anna, not every city in India has 20 temples on every block),the beautiful ghats,andthe hectic shopping markets. I can miss my favorite chai wallas, my local friends, or my Hindi teacher. But now more than ever I can see how incredibly unique that city, as a living entity,is. I can appreciatehow ancient it truly is-how richly steeped in history and tradition, largely unaffected by the Western world. Ican also look at my family back in Banaras and realize how trulyunique and special they were- to be able to wake every morning and perform puja in one of the most sacred cities in all of the world. To be able to walk down to their holy river at any time and cleanse their bodies and minds. These blessings seeped into their actions and their hearts, shaping their lives... these blessings are what welcomed me into their home, thus shaping my life.To this city and to this family, I will always be grateful.
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Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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Banaras Reflection

Anna Caritj,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

Just as my Mata-ji in Banaras used to tell me, it seemsI have, "Spent the last two months too quickly." This past week in Varanasi- the one I tried to savour, to stretch like taffy between my teeth andfingers to make it last- did what last weeks love to do: it flew by like the […]

Posted On

04/22/08

Author

Anna Caritj

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    [post_content] => Millions of people pilgrim from all across india, even the world, to bathe in the Ganga. Yet many of us had been here two months, exploring kashi and hadn't even stuck our toes in. So on monday night, despite the early wake up call it entailed, a few girls decided to meet the next morning and experience this sacred ritual first hand. 

It was with anticipation, and exhaustion that i dragged myself out of bed the next morning at 5:30 and stumbled through my alleyways towards the Ganga. Even though it was only a few hours before I normally commute to the program house, the whole atmosphere of the city was changed. It was not abnormally quiet. There were plenty of people wandering but it was a different crowd; a more devout crowd comprised of the men and women who pilgrimage down to the ganga every morning to bathe and preform puja. Barely any store fronts were open and the shouts of "hello madam, where you going?" were negligible.

I succeeded in getting to Asi ghat early. (Ghat's are the steps and open space leading down to the ganga and Asi is the neighborhood we've made our home here. It's also the last, and one of the more popular, ghats.) and spent my time wandering around taking pictures of the men getting fresh air shaves (something some of the boys in our group have recently discovered!) and the beautiful sunrise.

Finally Leti showed up, all smiles as usual, and we waited for the "others". When only Christina showed up to photograph a few minutes later we trudged down to the bank, set our stuff on one of the many wooden platforms, and took off our shoes. The land on the bank was so muddy and the bank itself so steeply erroded from all the foot traffic that we pretty much slipped our way past the women building mud statues right into the water. It was almost as if Ganga herself was just giving us a little nudge in.

It's good she did. If I had stopped to think i'm not sure i could have plunged into such polluted, populated water. My disgust at the all the things poured into the river- flowers, trash, and above all, dead bodies- has not decreased at all since the first day we got here. What has decreased, I suppose, is my willingness to leave behind thoughts and act on feelings and instincts.

It must have been instinct then that made us go on, squealing often as we navigated the slick bottom, our fellow bathers, and the bits of god-knows-what on the surface. I had planned on sticking my feet in symbolically, maybe dipping in up to my thigh. But the Ganga water just felt the way water does on an incredibly hot day; a feeling so comforting and wonderful that I just continued, fully clothed, up until my neck. Ultimately I did not have the guts Leti had to submerge myself completely. Yet considering my hypochondriac tendencies and the fact that only a month ago i had touched a finger to the surface of the water only to wash my hands immediately afterwards, I'm tremendously impressed by my ability to so nonchalantly let go.

The women around us smiled as we chattered, nervously incredulous of where we were and what we were doing. It was an honor to bathe in their presence, for they were welcoming but paid us little heed and continued to go about their morning rituals. Thus allowing us to absorb the bath and the bathing rituals for what they really are.

They also unintentionally helped me to glimpse the Ganga's sacred nature. While I have always felt a strong draw towards bodies of water, for me the ganga felt no different than the rivers and ponds I revere at home. Rather than the physical water itself, it is the dedication, respect, and purity the devotees bring to these shores each day that makes this particular water, even this city, vibrate with a special and particular energy.

After the embarrassing episode of emerging from the water (I had obliviously choosen to wear a white skirt that morning. figure the rest out yourself!) and the giggle fits that ensued, christina, leti and i sat on a wooden deck and enjoyed observing all the commotion. We lingered there a good while, appreciating the rare breeze that graced the morning. Finally we tore ourselves away and headed back to the program house, feeling satisfied, cleansed (at least emotionally) and ready to start our day. [post_title] => Ganga Ji [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => ganga-ji [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-04-18 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=55174 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 438 [name] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 [slug] => visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 438 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 259 [count] => 105 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 30.1 [cat_ID] => 438 [category_count] => 105 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 [category_nicename] => visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008 [category_parent] => 259 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2008/visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008/ ) ) [category_links] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 )

Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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Ganga Ji

Sylvie Lam,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

Millions of people pilgrim from all across india, even the world, to bathe in the Ganga. Yet many of us had been here two months, exploring kashi and hadn’t even stuck our toes in. So on monday night, despite the early wake up call it entailed, a few girls decided to meet the next morning […]

Posted On

04/18/08

Author

Sylvie Lam

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Hello Family and Friends!

We are SUPER busy with preparations for our final banquet and music concert tonight (with some 80 guests!) but just wanted to remind all those watching that we are leaving Banaras (and all our precious internet cafes) tomorrow morning and so you should expect to hear little to none from us. We still have communication systems in place for the purpose of emergencies and you can always call the Boulder Admin office should you need to get or relay importation information to/from students. Also, we will encourage all students to either write or call on the (India) evening of the 22nd, the day before we start our trek.

If you're interested, here's a quick view of our trek itinerary:

Itinerary from Auli to Wan: KUARI PASS TREK

22 April: Delhi-Rishikesh

23April: Rishikesh- Joshimath. Arrival Joshimath (1875m) O/N in guesthoust


24 April: Joshimath to Auli /Gorson (2800m) 14 kms by jeep. & 1st day Trek 3 hrs O/n tent

25 April: Gorson to Chtra Kanta (3200m) 6 hrs trek O/N in tent

26April: Chtra Kanta to GalGarh (3100m) 3 hrs trek O/n tent

27April: Galgarh to Sartoli via Kuari Pass (3640m) 7 to 8 hrs trek O/N tent

28April: Sartoli to Jhenjipani (1524m) 7 hrs trek O/N in tent

29 April: Jhenji Pani to Goni (2550m) 6 to 7 hrs trek O/N in tent

30 April: Goni to Sutol (2192m) 8 to 9 hrs trek O/N in tent

01 May: Full day rest day in Sutol.

02 May: Sutol to Kanol (2286m) 6 hrs trek O/N in tent

03 May: Kanol to Wan (2450m) 6 hrs trek O/N in tent (Trek End) .

04 May THRU 06 May: Rural Village Home stay in Wan


07 May: Wan to Rishikesh by bus.

08 May - 10 May: Semester Debriefing and "Disorientation"; Reintegrating back into American Society.

May 10th: Train to Delhi

May 11th, in the late evening, head to the airport for a flight on the 12th!

[post_title] => On The Road & In The Mountains: 4-19 thru 5-7 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => on-the-road-in-the-mountains-4-19-thru-5-7 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2008-04-18 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=55176 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 438 [name] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 [slug] => visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 438 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 259 [count] => 105 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 30.1 [cat_ID] => 438 [category_count] => 105 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 [category_nicename] => visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008 [category_parent] => 259 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/spring-2008/visions-of-india-semester-spring-2008/ ) ) [category_links] => Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008 )

Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

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On The Road & In The Mountains: 4-19 thru 5-7

India Instructor Team,Visions of India Semester, Spring 2008

Description

Hello Family and Friends! We are SUPER busy with preparations for our final banquet and music concert tonight (with some 80 guests!) but just wanted to remind all those watching that we are leaving Banaras (and all our precious internet cafes) tomorrow morning and so you should expect to hear little to none from us. […]

Posted On

04/18/08

Author

India Instructor Team

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