Photo of the Week
Photo Title


WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 132368
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-12-06 05:54:39
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-06 12:54:39
    [post_content] => Hello family and friends! (Some of) our beloved pequeños dragones are headed out of Central America for the U.S.A. Kye, Logan, Bryn, Laura, and Joanna have boarded their flight to Miami here in Guatemala City and should be back with you all, their loved ones, in just a few hours. It has been an emotional, and exhausting, end to the course. We are all sad to separate and see one another go, but so excited to see what the future holds for your, and our, remarkable pequeños dragones. Thank you again for lending them to us and for trusting us! They have been a joy to instruct and befriend.

Sincerely,

Brian
    [post_title] => On our way home!
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => on-our-way-home-3
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2016-01-20 10:34:34
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-01-20 17:34:34
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128857
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)
View post

On our way home!

Brian Reilly,Central America

Description

Hello family and friends! (Some of) our beloved pequeños dragones are headed out of Central America for the U.S.A. Kye, Logan, Bryn, Laura, and Joanna have boarded their flight to Miami here in Guatemala City and should be back with you all, their loved ones, in just a few hours. It has been an emotional, and […]

Posted On

12/6/15

Author

Brian Reilly

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 131569
    [post_author] => 24
    [post_date] => 2015-12-04 21:04:05
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-05 04:04:05
    [post_content] => In a few days it will be the 84th. In a few days I'll be in Sea-Tac airport. In a few days the distances between ten others and I will be measured by hundreds or thousands of miles instead of the width of a dining table during a group dinner...

So as a farewell to those I have gotten to know over this trip, some words of reflection -- a poem.

 

We Are Only What The Other Is

 

I’m an individual: 

I hold the ability to observe, to judge, to love, to aspire, to… to… to…

Melt it all together, and i’m authentic.

A sum like the shape of a snowflake.

Floating, Drifting on winds saddle.

Until an eventual settlement.

A shapeless mass.

Frosted ash. 

Each shape is an “I”, an identity. 

 

It’s the “I” which weaves a cocoon of identity;

like a sub-planet whose atmosphere’s color is “me”.

 

7 billion sub-planets revolve around one another,

each with a conviction that two never fuse,

mix,

and become anew. 

 

But with each close pass, the atmosphere's skim. 

leaving stains on one another. 

 

Another random skim, followed by another…

A widened vision shows an arena of drifting raps and grazes.

Of the light behind a prism. 

Of the infinite slivers in a spectrum.

The colors of each -- nothing more than a symphony of stains. 

 

My color now,

my “I” now,

this snapshot of an ever morphing evolution...

It’s the portrait of random collisions,

most recently with a group of 10 others. 

 

I will still leave with my singular color,

with “I”.

But with an “I” who sees its author…

 

Logan, Sophie, Laura, Bryn, Elise, Joe, Lucy, Juancho, Brian, Irene: Thank you.
Because I am only who you guys are. 

 
    [post_title] => We Are Only What The Other Is
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => we-are-only-what-the-other-is-2
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-12-17 15:37:54
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-12-17 22:37:54
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128756
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)

Central America

View post

We Are Only What The Other Is

Kye Dipboye,Central America

Description

In a few days it will be the 84th. In a few days I’ll be in Sea-Tac airport. In a few days the distances between ten others and I will be measured by hundreds or thousands of miles instead of the width of a dining table during a group dinner… So as a farewell to […]

Posted On

12/4/15

Author

Kye Dipboye

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 128677
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-12-02 13:51:15
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-02 20:51:15
    [post_content] => Dear Central America Students & Families,

It is hard to believe that 3 months have passed since embarking on this incredible adventure! It won’t be long and students will be boarding their planes back home. We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival!

Below is a reminder of the return group flight information for eagerly awaiting families:

December 6th, 2015

American Airlines AA 1182

Depart: Guatemala City 8:00 am

Arrive: Miami 11:43 am

We will have a Dragons Administrator on call for the duration of the travel day.   Starting on Saturday, 12/5, should you need any assistance after regular office hours, please call our “on-call” number at 303-921-6078.

We wish all students a great trip home!

Sincerely,

Boulder Admin
    [post_title] => Return Flight Information
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => return-flight-information-32
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-12-02 13:51:15
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-12-02 20:51:15
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128677
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)

Central America

View post

Return Flight Information

Anne Koenning,Central America

Description

Dear Central America Students & Families, It is hard to believe that 3 months have passed since embarking on this incredible adventure! It won’t be long and students will be boarding their planes back home. We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival! Below is a reminder of the return group flight information for […]

Posted On

12/2/15

Author

Anne Koenning

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 129797
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-11-24 09:30:20
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-24 16:30:20
    [post_content] => In her last post, Laura talks about the universality of love; a language that can transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries and bring strangers together. Especially when they suddenly show up at your home. And sit down at your dinner table. And sync into the rhythm of your daily life…

Yak board readers, you have not met us—you may have spoken with us when you’ve called the Boulder office—but this week, Jay, Hilary and I had the distinct pleasure of joining the Central America semester in the field for a one-week site visit.

The three of us are young hires in the Dragons Boulder office. Although we have varying levels of experience working in the field, none of us have spent time in Central America. Our first few hours in country were a blur: sharp pangs of hunger rousing our dormant Spanish, Me gusteria eso… and soon we were sleeping and waking and bumping all the way to Pachaj. When we tumbled out of the car, stalks of maize cast shadows overhead and Kye, Laura, Bryn, Sophie, Logan, Elise, Jo, Lucy and the DUF I-Team (Ie. All-star) enveloped us with open arms. We were strangers, but we were taken in.

It’s difficult to summarize our week together. Students, we empathize with you and the task you’ll take on when you return home in a few weeks. We've cobbled together a few vignettes below, and we hope it begins to share our story...

I learned that tamalitos are served at every meal. That means that my home-stay mom, Cati, wakes up early to cup the maize into little pockets each day. Her hands move with ease as she corrects my use of the pretérito, feeds her two niños, and quickly fills a basket for lunch. If it rains in November, she warns, our corn harvest will begin to sprout. Last year, we lost half of our harvest. She moves to cover the stack of tamalitos with a woven blanket; I watch the rain clouds assemble on the horizon. It’s supposed to be our dry season now. But it rained everyday we were in Guatemala. I think about changing climate patterns and wonder if the Mayans have an explanation for fickle weather in their cosmology.

We learned that political fatigue and the gradual whitewashing of history are not just American phenomena. The citizens of Guatemala just elected a TV-star to be their president; and while Jimmy Morales may be on par with Trump for prior political experience, he seems an amiable alternative to Peres Molina: the ex-military general elected to office in 2012. Leaders can build name recognition in many ways: posters, billboards, state radio, genocide… and sometimes the density of their press campaigns seems to matter more than the details of their past. Today, the primary growth forests outside of Pachaj offer a subtle reminder of the 1980s and scorched earth. As we careened past political graffiti on state roads, we remembered that we have to listen close if we intend to keep history from repeating itself…

We learned that even environmentalists can be subversive. Mining companies are vying for control over the hillsides outside of Pachaj and Armando Lopez, of the Chico Mendes Reforestation Project, wagers that if he plants enough trees, Guatemala’s coveted quetzal will return to the region and the government will be forced to declare K’iak a national forest. If it works, this will protect Pachaj’s natural beauty, as well as the water sources that support the local communities.

It’s hard to say it all… there’s more we’d like to learn about the rise of evangelism, sex ed and emigration…

Central America Semester, we wish we had more time with you. Students Y DUF, thank you for welcoming us into your group with such unrestrained love. We’ll continue to follow your journey in the weeks to come and we can’t wait to see where it takes you. It was truly a pleasure to spend the week with you.

Most of all, please take pictures of your Thanksgiving feast. The autumnal-Mayan fusion theme sounds amazing. And keep us up to date with Luna's recovery.

All our love,

Jay, Hilary & Cate
    [post_title] => This Thanksgiving, we're grateful for you!
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => this-thanksgiving-were-grateful-for-you
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-11-24 18:08:33
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-24 18:08:33
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128472
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)
View post

This Thanksgiving, we’re grateful for you!

Cate, Hilary & Jay,Central America

Description

In her last post, Laura talks about the universality of love; a language that can transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries and bring strangers together. Especially when they suddenly show up at your home. And sit down at your dinner table. And sync into the rhythm of your daily life… Yak board readers, you have not […]

Posted On

11/24/15

Author

Cate, Hilary & Jay

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 129805
    [post_author] => 24
    [post_date] => 2015-11-21 20:50:34
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-21 20:50:34
    [post_content] => Language can bring people together as well as keep them apart. Wars have been fought over misunderstanding intention or simply not understanding each other at all. It's easy for people to alienate each other when they don't have the means to understand each other's culture. The union of humanity is most commonly found through the ability to connect and relate on various levels. That ability is lost when people can't express themselves, especially verbally. The indigenous people here in Guatemala suffered genocide from a government that failed to understand them. They became simply a nuisance that needed to be terminated. It is such a sad thing when humanity is lost. Juancho shared with us a story of when the Dalai Lama visited Guatemala, an eager audience member asked him, "How do we bring our country together since there so many different languages?” And the Dalai Lama simply replied, " Learn their language."

I just spent a week in the city of Cotzal, Guatemala. The population there primarily speaks Ixil, one of the many Mayan tongues. Most people chose to speak in Ixil instead of Spanish or simply didn´t speak Spanish at all. Sadly, there was quite a barrier between our groups. It was already difficult at times to communicate in Spanish, and now a new language had been thrown into the mix. I made an effort to learn basic words and use them as much as I could, but there was only so much I could do. In my time there, I observed often something that never failed to be communicated: love. The people were by far the most touchy and openly loving group of people I had encountered thus far. My host family was so affectionate towards me, not to mention incredibly generous with what they had. The little children would give me loads of hugs and kisses on the cheek. I felt so welcomed and happy to be there. The founder of the co-op, Katarina, told us that these families from the weaving co-op used to be scared of welcoming complete strangers into their homes. Now they feel it's like welcoming a new family member and quite enjoy it. How beautiful is that? Even though there were language barriers that couldn't be helped, this experience taught me one thing for sure: Love is a universal language.

"Love does not cost anything. Kind words and deeds do not cost anything. The real beauty of the world is equal for everyone to see . . . For when it comes time that we are all stripped to bare bones before the divine, and facing eternity, we will understand that the only law we were meant to follow, was to love ourselves and each other. Nothing more...nothing less." ― Carla Jo Masterson

Learn each other's languages. It can only help us to understand each other better, if not build a more compassionate world. But until then, keep on loving- it's universally understood.
    [post_title] => Love is a Universal Language
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => love-is-a-universal-language
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-11-30 16:52:43
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-30 16:52:43
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://dragons.site.moxiesozo.net/blog/
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)

Central America

View post

Love is a Universal Language

Admissions1,Central America

Description

Language can bring people together as well as keep them apart. Wars have been fought over misunderstanding intention or simply not understanding each other at all. It’s easy for people to alienate each other when they don’t have the means to understand each other’s culture. The union of humanity is most commonly found through the […]

Posted On

11/21/15

Author

Admissions1

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 128016
    [post_author] => 24
    [post_date] => 2015-11-12 19:39:01
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-13 02:39:01
    [post_content] => For a large portion of this trip, among all the variety of songs that have become staples of this lovely group of pequeños dragones, I have had one specific song stuck in my head. I’ve come to think of it as an embodiment of the perspective shifts and mental processing I’ve been doing on this trip, as well as the experiences I’m having and the things I’m learning. I’ll do my best to explain each verse in the hope that listening to this song might paint a picture of the things that I, and maybe others in this group, am thinking about and experiencing.

Verse 1
I was raised up believing I was somehow unique,
Like a snowflake, distinct among snowflakes,
Unique in each way you can see.
And now after some thinking, I’d say I’d rather be
A functioning cog in some great machinery,
Serving something beyond me
But I don’t, i don’t know what that will be,
I’ll get back to you someday soon you will see.

This verse reflects a change in perspective and focus. Through the course of this trip, I have begun to think of myself less in the context of my own life, less as a unique snowflake who must exert her energy on herself, and more as a citizen of the world, as one small part of a great machine, my piece of which may either be used to create a positive or negative impact, or no impact at all. I have begun to feel a stronger drive to live my life sustainably, consciously and with respect in a very active way. Not for my own benefit, but rather with the greater good of the world and it’s people in mind. For example, buying new things to feed my ego falls away and instead, a desire to avoid unnecessary consumption falls into it’s place.
The last two lines embody the part of me which is still confused and unsure of exactly how I will be able to implement the living practices I’m learning and thinking about. I wonder if they will stay at the forefront of my mind long enough and strong enough for me to build my life around them.
The last line represents my desire to continue thinking, reexamining, taking “gap” periods, and to continue searching.

Verse 2
What’s my name, what’s my station? Oh just tell me what I should do,
I don’t need to be kind to the armies of night
That would do such injustice to you.
Or bow down and be grateful and say, sure take all that you see,
To the men who move only in dimly lit halls
And determine my future for me.
And I don’t, I don’t know who to believe,
I’ll get back to you someday soon you will see,

While on this trip, we’ve done a lot learning and thinking about power. Who has power, how it’s exerted, and how it affects people. The first part of this verse reminds me of how overwhelmed I feel learning more about capitalism and who really exerts the power and affects people’s lives. At IMAP (Mesoamerican Permaculture Institute) we looked at detailed and creatively drawn maps, made by the Beehive Collective. They depict cycles of power, of capitalism, and consumerism, which have hurt Mesoamerica, and in some ways, taken away it’s voice. In many ways, everyone is trapped in a cycle of consumerism which has hugely negative impacts on other parts of the world.
The next part is an almost exact description of the way many people experienced the war and armed conflict that we’ve learned about, which occurred in very similar ways in Nicaragua and Guatemala. It’s a vivid reminder of the horrific stories recounted to us, and a vivd reminder of the power that our government and our companies exert to move others like puppets, and get what they want regardless of the consequence.
We learned about Edward Bernays, a man who people rarely know about, but who is one of the most influential people of the 20th century. He came up with genius and very effective uses of propaganda to manipulate entire populations into supporting certain companies or government decisions. He is one of many people who have extreme amounts of power and influence in the world, but who are hidden from the eyes of the people.
In the last part, again, I get overwhelmed by the complex and intersecting events of history in Nicaragua, Guatemala, and around the world. There are so many different ways of telling the same story, so many different stories told about the same events. I will not stop learning, investigating, striving to understand what happened in conflicts around the world, and trying to understand the way that the people, organizations, and governments in power have intervened, or even orchestrated these events.

Verse 3
If I know only one thing, it’s that everything that I see
Of the world outside is so inconceivable,
Often I barely can speak.
Yeah I’m tongue-tied, and dizzy, and I can’t keep it to myself.
What good is it to sing helplessness blues?
Why should I wait for anyone else?
And I know, I know you will leave me on the shelf
I’ll get back to you someday soon myself.

This verse feels like the summary of the way I often feel on this trip. Whether what I am learning and absorbing is a positive or negative thing, I am almost always awed and astounded by the things going on around me, the things I never knew or thought about, the knowledge and generosity of everyone I meet.
I feel a wild desire to share what I am discovering on this trip, a need to impart the knowledge I am gaining to others, to help them begin to open their eyes the way I have begun to open mine. I realize - all over again - that the things I know are much less than the things I don’t know.
At the same time, there’s an urgency I feel to remember these lessons and use them. The changes I want to make, the knowledge I want to implement, I can’t wait for others to understand or support before I apply them to my life.
The last two lines are in anticipation of the way others may not be able to understand what I have learned and experienced, and a promise that after i have done my own discovering and built my own life, that someday I will return to tell them everything that I have seen everything I know I don’t know.

Outro
If I had an orchard, I’d work till I’m raw.
If I had an orchard I’d work till I’m sore.
And you would wait tables and soon run the store.

Gold hair in the sunlight, my light in the dawn.
If I had an orchard I’d work till I’m sore.
If I had an orchard I’d work till I’m sore.

Someday I’ll be like the man on the screen.

This last part connects directly to the food forests and sustainable living we learned about at IMAP. I’d love to begin growing my own food at some point in my life, and I’d work hard to show others, spread the message, and get people involved.
The line referring to light reminds me of all the beautiful landscapes and the beautiful types and amounts of light that I have seen in different places. The gold hair reminds me of the the way we stand in this country, the way we are seen by the people here in both a good and bad light.
The last line is the ultimate question for me. The man on the screen, to me, is someone sinister, someone maybe who we’ve seen in the documentaries we've watched, a politician or social mastermind. The man on the screen is someone who exists as a display for the public, to tell them something, convince them, assuage their fears. He does not exist for the good of the world or the honesty of his own experience, and certainly does not represent the people or their experiences or diversity of backgrounds in any real way. He is a facade, and representation, hiding behind a screen.
The last line is a question: will I be able to uphold the standards for treating the earth and the people, the values and beliefs that I am learning here? Or will I eventually forget and fall back into a life where I don't feel real, where I am not honest with myself, where I do not work to change the world for the better in a respectful and sustainable way?
These are my attempts, though incomplete, to explain the things I am struggling with and thinking about as I explore myself, these countries, and these people.

http://youtu.be/6mR8Z-gmK1g
    [post_title] => A Song for the Road
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => a-song-for-the-road
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-11-12 19:39:01
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-13 02:39:01
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128016
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)

Central America

View post

A Song for the Road

Bryn Lewin-Ofell,Central America

Description

For a large portion of this trip, among all the variety of songs that have become staples of this lovely group of pequeños dragones, I have had one specific song stuck in my head. I’ve come to think of it as an embodiment of the perspective shifts and mental processing I’ve been doing on this […]

Posted On

11/12/15

Author

Bryn Lewin-Ofell

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 128017
    [post_author] => 24
    [post_date] => 2015-11-12 19:31:34
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-13 02:31:34
    [post_content] => We set out this morning down the winding roads of Todos Santos, a town in the Guatemalan highlands, to find out about the traditional textiles of the indigenous Mam people that live here. We happened upon a textile shop and learned from a sign written in three different languages that the goods were produced by a Women´s Cooperative here in town. We asked an anciana, who we recognized from our hospedaje, if she could tell us about the history and significance of the red striped pants and blue faldas that are worn by almost every man and woman that we see. We ended up sitting on the cold floor of the back room of the shop, talking with Santiaga Mendoza Pablo for over an hour.

At the age of six, Santiaga’s father died, leaving her, her mother and her two brothers without income. Her mother brought the children to the coast to work in the fields. The authorities came multiple times trying to enroll Santiaga in school. Her mother said that she could go back to Todos Santos to attend school, but she would have to feed and care for herself. Afraid of starvation and of being alone at the age of twelve, she chose to forgo a traditional, school-based education in favor of one learned from her mother and the traditions of the Mam people.

Motioning towards Bryn who was scribbling notes in her journal, Santiaga told us that the same way that Bryn had her pen, with which she learned, and with which she could make her living, her mother had the well-worn sticks lying on the hide in front of us. She used these two-pronged tools to beat cotton into string, which she could turn into intricately patterned fabrics to clothe her family and to sell. She told us, You can read and write, I cannot, but I know how to make tortillas, to weave, to care for my children and my husband. We each have different skills that our parents gave us. Your mother, your father, they taught you these things and you took advantage of this education; in the same way, my mother taught me the skills I needed to live.

As women, she said,”hacemos, tejemos, usamos”: we make, we weave, we use. It is the tradition of our lives to weave. The woman that knows how to weave is a good woman. The woman who knows how to weave will be a good wife. She will show her love for her family through weaving their clothes. Some women no longer know how to weave, but those who are intelligent weave their own fabrics with loving care. We teach our daughters, because if we don’t teach her, pobre ella, she will not be able to teach her daughter.

When Santiaga was a girl, her mother provided for the family by selling traditional clothing to tourists. In order to create a more stable lifestyle, she needed better work. She asked a man she met what she could do to help herself, a widowed woman with three children. The man told her to gather a group of woman to support each other in their weaving, and this she did. After some time, there was a problem within the group which led her mother to leave the cooperative. Santiaga described how during this time, her mother stayed in the house crying almost constantly. By the time Santiaga was twenty, she had started a women’s weaving cooperative, just as her mother had done years before.

Santiaga told her mother, Thank you, you’ve taught me. Now I’ve started my own cooperative and we have a way to support ourselves and each other, the clients will come. Don’t be sad. Santiaga told us,”Trabajamos juntos para que no morimos por el hambre”: we work together so that we don’t die of hunger. The inn we are staying in tonight was built using the profits Santiaga earned from her work in the cooperative. Aside from street vendors, she is the only female business owner in town. She reminded us that as women, if a man does not contribute to the partnership, if he does not treat you with respect, to leave him. As women, we must be agents of our own lives; we must be able to support ourselves.

Elise asked her if the people of Todos Santos are discriminated against for wearing traje tipico in the larger cities where the people are less connected to Mayan tradition. She said, Before yes. Thirty or forty years ago we were discriminated against for wearing traje tipico. Now, we no longer accept discrimination. If they say something that I don’t like, they better be careful with their words. I was invited to the United States and I wore mi ropa. I am okay with mi ropa, porque es mi ropa. We are all flesh and bone; we are like flowers, each looking their own way, with their own clothing and skin cBrown, white, black, we’re all the same flesh and bone underneath. 
    [post_title] => Hacemos, Tejemos, Usamos
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => hacemos-tejemos-usamos
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-11-12 19:31:34
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-13 02:31:34
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128017
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)

Central America

View post

Hacemos, Tejemos, Usamos

Elise Morano and Bryn Lewin-Ofell,Central America

Description

We set out this morning down the winding roads of Todos Santos, a town in the Guatemalan highlands, to find out about the traditional textiles of the indigenous Mam people that live here. We happened upon a textile shop and learned from a sign written in three different languages that the goods were produced by […]

Posted On

11/12/15

Author

Elise Morano and Bryn Lewin-Ofell

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 128012
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-11-11 16:30:45
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-11 23:30:45
    [post_content] => 
    [post_title] => Working at the coop
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => working-at-the-coop
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-11-11 16:30:45
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-11 23:30:45
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128012
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)
View post

Working at the coop

I-team,Central America

Description

Posted On

11/11/15

Author

I-team

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 128010
    [post_author] => 26
    [post_date] => 2015-11-11 16:29:29
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-11 23:29:29
    [post_content] => 
    [post_title] => Boxbol feast
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => boxbol-feast
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-11-11 16:29:29
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-11 23:29:29
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128010
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)
View post

Boxbol feast

I-team,Central America

Description

Posted On

11/11/15

Author

I-team

Category

Central America

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 128006
    [post_author] => 24
    [post_date] => 2015-11-11 11:25:33
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-11-11 18:25:33
    [post_content] => 
    [post_title] => Cotzal
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => cotzal-7
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2015-11-11 11:25:33
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-11-11 18:25:33
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=128006
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
    [categories] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 116
                    [name] => Central America
                    [slug] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 116
                    [taxonomy] => category
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 236
                    [count] => 65
                    [filter] => raw
                    [term_order] => 4.1
                    [cat_ID] => 116
                    [category_count] => 65
                    [category_description] => 
                    [cat_name] => Central America
                    [category_nicename] => central-america-fall-2015
                    [category_parent] => 236
                    [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2015/central-america-fall-2015/
                )

        )

    [category_links] => Central America
)
View post

Cotzal

Instructors,Central America

Description

Posted On

11/11/15

Author

Instructors

Category

Central America

1 2 3 7