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    [post_date] => 2013-12-06 09:33:29
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-12-06 16:33:29
    [post_content] => Dear Indonesia Semester Students & Families,

It is hard to believe that 3 months have passed since embarking on this incredible adventure! It won’t be long and students will be boarding their planes back home. We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival!

Below is a reminder of the return group flight information for eagerly awaiting families:

December 6th, 2013
China Airlines #680
Depart: Jakarta (CGK) 6:35am
Arrive: Taipei (TPE) 2:45pm

December 6th, 2013
China Airlines #006
Depart: Taipei (TPE) 5:10pm
Arrive: Los Angeles (LAX) 12:40pm

We will have a Dragons Administrator on call for the duration of the travel day. Starting on Friday, 12/6, should you need any assistance after regular office hours, please call our “on-call” number at 760-709-0848.

We wish all students a great trip home!

Sincerely,

Boulder Admin
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Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

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Return Group Flight Information

Dragons Admin,Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

Description

Dear Indonesia Semester Students & Families, It is hard to believe that 3 months have passed since embarking on this incredible adventure! It won’t be long and students will be boarding their planes back home. We are sure you are anxiously awaiting their arrival! Below is a reminder of the return group flight information for […]

Posted On

12/6/13

Author

Dragons Admin

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    [post_date] => 2013-12-05 18:27:58
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    [post_content] => Dear friends and family of the Indonesia semester,

The instructors have sent in word that all the students traveling with the group flight are now on their way home.

Thank you for a wonderful journey, and we wish all the students safe travels to their respective destinations!

With care,

Boulder Administration
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Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

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Indonesia course on its way home

Dragons Admin,Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

Description

Dear friends and family of the Indonesia semester, The instructors have sent in word that all the students traveling with the group flight are now on their way home. Thank you for a wonderful journey, and we wish all the students safe travels to their respective destinations! With care, Boulder Administration

Posted On

12/5/13

Author

Dragons Admin

WP_Post Object
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    [post_date] => 2013-12-05 08:50:14
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-12-05 15:50:14
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Group-Pic-BEFORE-300x225
(Here is a picture of us today, taken in the same spot as three months ago. Missing is Aaron, our program director, but we've saved his space!) On a cliffside resort over the beach of Parangtritis on the island of Java, the group has spent two days – their last of the trip – thinking about assimilating their experiences back into their life at home. Dragons calls this part of the trip “transference.” Activities geared toward thinking about the journey home included writing a letter-to-self that will be received two years from now; crafting a yak-yak for next semester’s participants;  learning about “re-entry shock” and tips for how to deal with it; sharing personal gifts and compliments during “secret volcano;” using law of attraction principles to vision a transition back home; brainstorming goals for 2014; and exploring a “bag of wisdom” that included thoughts on beauty, the journey, keeping in contact, staying updated on international events, continuing language study, pursuing scholarships and grants, and finding other ways to stay connected to Indonesia. When students were asked to put their attention homeward, they expressed they felt excitement tempered by sadness. We asked our students to share: what are you sad to be leaving behind? I’m leaving behind every day being an adventure. I’ll miss Indonesia’s timeless “rubber-time” culture. 14 diverse, crazy, insightful, hysterical, obscure and loveable people provided to me by Dragons. I’m going to miss tempeh. Tempeh is so freaking good. I’m leaving behind the lack of privacy that’s surprisingly refreshing, the gentle curiosity towards the small aspects of my life. Horrifying but exhilarating traffic and incredible food. I’m leaving behind at least a million smiles, 10 thousand laughs, 100 friends and endless obstacles overcome. I’m leaving behind the exhilarating feeling of having no clue what sort of environment and culture I will find myself in next week. I am leaving friends I made in Indonesia. I am going to miss Naldo, one of the most caring men I know. I’m going to miss Ganda who despite talking in circles, always has other people’s best interests at heart. I’m leaving behind Mudi from Sampela and the man we came to know as “Old Man Jenkins” from Toraja. I’m going to miss Pace, Lauda, and Zaki. I’m grateful for the chance to have forged a connection with so many different people. I’m leaving behind 5 different families: in the city, jungle, over the ocean, in the mountains, and one that has been there through all of it. I’m not leaving anything behind because I know someday I’m going to come back here for more. As a family or friend, you may be wondering how students have changed. What has the impact of this trip been, these three months spent in such remarkably different environments. We asked our students to share: what would you like to tell friends and family back home? I want to be asked a lot of questions about my gap year. Please be patient if Indonesia is the only topic I want to talk about. Please help me to stay busy and feel included so that I can be content with where I am and not wishing I was back in Indonesia. Other than affection, it is important too to ask me questions about what I did and to get involved in the stories I bring back. I want to spend more time with my parents, my parents are amazing. But I want more control over my life. In being apart I realized I can make responsible decisions. Let me decide what college is best, how to take care of myself, and when to come home at night. I have realized I am capable and I want the chance to prove it to them. I want to continue to travel. I’m taking home a more confident thankful and loving self. I’m going to take new experiences with excitement and curiosity. Not a day went past in my last 3 months where I felt unchallenged and bored. At home the temptation to fall into a rhythm is so great that the prospect of adventure disappears – home is overwhelmingly comfortable. I know that at home, I can easily slip into a rhythm that will leave me adventureless. I will try my best to teach everyone at least one thing they didn’t know about Indonesia – to help further educate people about a country and its walks of life. I’ve learned the power of human connection and hope to bring that home with me. I am eternally grateful for the experience – so to my family, thank you. To everyone who has supported our students on their gap semester –office workers in Boulder, family members, friends, benefactors, supportive teachers, and in-country contacts – to all we all say Terima Kasih – Thank You. 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For Friends and Family

Everyone,Best Notes From The Field, Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

Description

(Here is a picture of us today, taken in the same spot as three months ago. Missing is Aaron, our program director, but we’ve saved his space!) On a cliffside resort over the beach of Parangtritis on the island of Java, the group has spent two days – their last of the trip – thinking […]

Posted On

12/5/13

Author

Everyone

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    [post_date] => 2013-12-03 08:11:51
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I’m a visual learner and I’ve deduced that the best way to appropriately convey some of the remarkable things I’ve seen and done is through my TOP TEN FAVORITE PHOTOS. Actually, I’m indecisive so when I ran over my self-determined limit of 10 I played eeny-meeny-minee-moe to reduce my list. Thus, I present my TOP TEN WINNING (SURVIVING) photos from that game! 1) About a week and a half ago I was lucky enough to be one of the few in our group to travel to Wanci with some local teenagers from Sampela for the Bajao festival. Essentially, the Bajao Olympics. Bajolympics! The festival consisted of a carnival-like celebration at night and absurdly awesome competitions during the day. The contestants were typically middle-aged Bajao men, built similarly to club bouncers, who competed in things like canoe tug-of-war, diving contests, kayak racing and more. After each round or event  finished, the younger spectators waiting on the edge of the harbor’s water would immediately jump in and frolic with joy so intense and heartwarming you’d think it was the first time they’d seen the ocean. 2) The hand of a woman who often shuffled by my batik house in Yogya with her weathered walking stick loyally beside her. She occasionally stopped to quietly ask for money, sit with Black (the Rastafarian neighbor) or just touch my shoulder. Whenever I would leave my ISP covered to my elbows in residual dye, the thing I remembered most of her was the hands. They were soft yet so tough and worn that I frequently found my thoughts in the taxi home lingering to imagine the life a human’s hand leads. I imagined what ages hands to such a graceful extreme. So I took her picture. 3) The day we left our place of orientation, Queen of the Sea, we visited a local fish market to pick our lunch out by hand. The market was a large, indoor hall with tall counters lining the center aisle. On top of these counters lay stacks of every kind of fish, shellfish, or sea dwelling creature imaginable. The fishy piles towered high, waiting for our choosing. But I must admit, when I stepped out of the sweltering sun into the tiled hall, the smell was so crude and intrusive that I could only think, “Well, I guess I’m getting food poisoning today.”  Four hours later after adjusting to the smell, rounding up our meal and finding a local restaurant to cook it, I was beyond pleasantly surprised. The kitchen was quaint and dim yet lively with the colorful broths and vegetable bundles waiting for Wake and I to hack at with knives. I’ve found most Indonesian kitchens to have the same effect; simplistic with marvelous amazement. 4) I like this picture not because it looks like an advertisement for organic rustic living but because it’s the most encompassing and least gruesome picture I have from celebrating Idul Adha. In the United States, at least for me, it feels like there’s a disconnect between the animals we kill for our food and our food. But on the Muslim holiday of Idul Adha where animals like cows and goats are sacrificed to Allah, I saw many living, breathing animals transform from livestock to meat products in fifteen minutes flat. The animal was cajoled towards the small hole in the earth for collecting the blood and held down while a religious man with a sacrificial knife said a prayer over the animal’s death. Fast forward thirty five minutes: the animal is skinned and the meat is being fussed over by forty of the female volunteers. The raw meat was cut with petite axes, weighed with large brass scales and divided into small bags to be dealt out to the less fortunate and those in the neighborhood. 5) Oh the magical, mystical, subject-to-change-able Pelni! We heard of the Pelni; “There may be rats,” “I’m imaging it like human cargo,” “It’s a possibility you’ll be stolen from,” and “This article says it will smell like urine.” Luckily, only one of those prophecies turned out to be true! With little hope and zero firsthand experience to go on, we emerged from the sea of humans bustling through the archway to the open dock and saw our real life Titanic (not yet sunk). It had not enough life boats available for all travelers on board which is why all fifteen of us have been each lugging around a neon orange lifejacket since leaving Yogya. Seriously, you should’ve seen the looks of horror we saw from fellow air passengers when we stepped onto our airplane in the Yogyakarta airport with lifejackets in hand.  The Pelni was immense and through Rita’s supernatural powers of slight bribery we were upgraded to our own rooms! The Pelni was an unparalleled experience. We hijacked a dining room for the duration, watched We Are The Millers on a laptop, did some thought-provoking creative writing, toured the decks bursting with passengers and celebrated a birthday! 6) The Sikunir sunrise. The first morning of X-phase we camped, yes to all Indonesians alike who doubted us, we camped in chilly Dieng and awoke before the sunlight. Sikunir’s sunrise was advertised to us by Aaron, our program director, as “one of the three best of his life.” We were sold. Sitting on a rock next to Sam, bundled in four layers so thick my arms could not lay flat against my sides, we waited for the sun.  First sunlight broke just over the clouds we had camped above and washed our campsite in a blood-orange glow. 7) Where to begin to describe Peter’s wild, hyperactive, overgrown eight year old, five-minute breath-holding, occasionally intoxicated, Sampela homestay father? I guess there. Lauda is your guy for a great story to take home, a way to a catch a crazy fish you’ve only seen in movies or a good old -fashioned wrestling match. My first experience with Lauda came when he took a group of us to Hoga for a few hours to snorkel and play on the beach. I was sitting in the water just off the shore when I found the most amazing shell. It was larger than my palm and spiraled in on itself in vibrant orange and purple. It was smooth and perfect; I planned to give it to my mom in the States. Lauda walked over a few minutes later and asked me what I had found. I held out my hand proudly presenting my find and he carefully picked it up. He looked it over then asked me while grinning, “Suka?” which translates to, “You like this?” I nodded, beaming. Then he threw it. He chucked my shell away, far into the depths of the ocean. As I watched it soar away from me and my face fell realizing what had happened, Lauda laughed maniacally, pushed me over and ran away giggling. Two hours later he speared an eel the thickness of my thigh and the length of my body by diving down twenty meters with no equipment but a pair of wooden goggles. That’s Lauda. 8) Three different colors of rice represented land, sea and coral. The egg symbolizes the soul. This ceremony was held at the Shaman’s house in Sampela to help cure the recipient of any torso ailment. It was called the Crocodile Ceremony and in fact, my frequent back pain led me to be a participant! An offering was created twice on two large banana leaves as a sacrifice by an older woman who gracefully created leaf-like origami with her deft hands. Once completed, both were waved over my head and one was set out to sea in a canoe with Grace holding an umbrella over it for protection. It was then placed in the ocean for an offering to the sea gods. The event concluded when I chose three bananas and ate them. Although my back pain has persisted, I attribute that to my extreme over-packing. 9) This picture is simple. I just think it’s completely pure. This is Fish and his Sampela homestay grandpa who is the Shaman I previously mentioned. In this picture they had only been a Dragon-arranged, temporary family for two days. Though they live on different continents, grew up in different time periods and speak different languages, they both share identical expressions of appreciation and contentment as they looked out towards the ocean. 10) A small naked boy, surrounded by trash with a hopeless look. It seems appropriate for a Feed Our Children commercial: those television ads – a white-haired American man wandering through a desolate village picking up children with distended stomachs saying fifteen cents a month can feed them. From the look of it, this could be that place. Therefore, I feel the need to point out the facts and inaccuracies in this photograph. This was taken in Sampela and yes, Sampela has a lot of naked kids and even more trash. Constant nakedness lends itself to the never-ending slew of children that leap from the docks to the water below. The lack of clothes often seems to be a choice. The trash as well. It hasn’t been swept in by a monsoon or massive flooding as in the TV commercials but discarded there by the people themselves. Although the trash was a frequent topic of discussion among our Dragon’s group, the Bajao people of Sampela accept it. Yet, the most important thing I feel the need to clarify is the look on his face. This look is not one I ever saw replicated on a kid’s face in my eleven days in Sampela. This photo initially roused feelings of sorrow for me.   I felt bad for the boy even though I took the photograph and saw him run away giggling not ten seconds later! In fact, Sampela is so incredibly loud because of the shrieking, laughing children playing all day and well into the night. This isn’t to discredit anything like Feed Our Children or to say that Sampela isn’t a poor community but rather to make the reader aware of how easily and wrongly one can draw skewed conclusions from photo journalism. I didn’t mean to end my yak on a somber tone but I know these ten pictures sum up my experience in its entirety; good, bad, happy, sad, amazing or thought-provoking. This has been my Indonesia. So far.     [post_title] => Indonesia Through Emily’s Lens [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => indonesia-through-emilys-lens-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-08 16:17:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-08 23:17:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=95083 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 36 [name] => Best Notes From The Field [slug] => best-notes-from-the-field [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 36 [taxonomy] => category [description] => These pieces of travel writing are reflections by students and instructors traveling all over the world. They exemplify the open-minded spirit of exploration and self-discovery on a Dragons course. 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Indonesia Through Emily’s Lens

Emily Rahravan,Best Notes From The Field, Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

Description

I’m a visual learner and I’ve deduced that the best way to appropriately convey some of the remarkable things I’ve seen and done is through my TOP TEN FAVORITE PHOTOS. Actually, I’m indecisive so when I ran over my self-determined limit of 10 I played eeny-meeny-minee-moe to reduce my list. Thus, I present my TOP […]

Posted On

12/3/13

Author

Emily Rahravan

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    [post_date] => 2013-11-18 17:32:04
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    [post_content] => It was a hot morning on the sea, but I had to get some of that hot tea and roti

So I rushed to Andar’s to start my day. Nothing, today, will get in my way

I went home and layed with the fam, on the porch we sat and then I swam

Clear blue water, fish all around, much more soothing than Yogyakarta sounds

Get in the boat, it’s time to fish. A net full of tuna, I can only wish

Heading towards home I can feel my stomach groan

Back to Andar’s for lunch, round two. Hope there’s more fishing for us to do

Porch relaxing until three, then snorkeling – back to the deep blue sea

Last boat ride home for the day. “Mandi?” our Ibu’s say

We wash outside in a sarong while the kids around us play and sing songs

Back to Andar’s, round three. I hope we’re eating snapper and more roti

The sun is setting on another eventful day

I can’t help but think what tomorrow brings our way

It’s time to start getting ready for bed. “Selamat tidur” Ibu said

Day is done; gone the sun, can’t wait for tomorrow’s fun
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Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

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Grace and Sam Poem Fun dash Yak

Grace and Sam,Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

Description

It was a hot morning on the sea, but I had to get some of that hot tea and roti So I rushed to Andar’s to start my day. Nothing, today, will get in my way I went home and layed with the fam, on the porch we sat and then I swam Clear blue […]

Posted On

11/18/13

Author

Grace and Sam

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    [post_date] => 2013-11-12 16:48:31
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-11-12 23:48:31
    [post_content] => A sea breeze cut the humidity of the night. It reminded me that in all directions, the sea surrounds Sampela – modest houses on stilts over a shallow seagrass reef – our home for 11 days and to a community of Bajao, or sea gypsies. The sea underneath me rises and drops every eight hours like a seasaw. By the sound of its lapping, it had started to rise.

I was sitting with Andar, who suddenly asked me what does “Where There Be Dragons” mean.

I told him a story: “A thousand years ago, people made peta, maps, but they only knew about part of the dunia. Not the whole world. So they drew dragons to represent the outside of the map. So going “where there be dragons” means to go off the map, to places that we do not understand.”

Andar nodded. He shifted in his hammock. I enjoyed another breeze.

“The Dragon is in the sky and you can see him at night,” he told me. “My Grandfather told me this, about Dragons.”

And Andar told me a story too:

“It’s like in one day, God collects all the people… how to you say it? All the biology, like animals, people, everythings. He gather, meeting. That day, God will divide the world. It’s like ok, Kalidupa, this is your part. OK? Like you, it’s your part. Da-da-da-da-da, this is your part. You understand?

“The Bajao come late. They wake up late. Then everything on the others hands. You understand I mean? Everything, like mountain, your part. Beach, somebody have. Da-da-da-da-da. Bajao late. Finish, only the sea. No one interest.

“He not choose only the sea. In that day, somebody protest because it’s not fair. About how to divide the world. It’s naga. The Dragon. And that’s why he ran to the sky. He gone. But still like can see the world, he protest because the God when he divide, not fair. And he running, pergi, to the sky.”

I took this to mean that the Bajao believe the Milky Way galaxy is a Dragon that spreads out like a snake over Sampela and the ocean.

“Sometime he go close to the Earth but he not touch the world, the Earth…. It’s like his promise, I will go and never back to the Earth. But sometime he come close to the Earth. Also, people in other places call the Bajao, Naga.”

I wondered if this is how the Bajao traditionally saw themselves – like the Dragon, upholding a promise not to return to the land. Earlier when we had stepped on soil to see the local market, we saw Bajao women in their boats trading fish to the land-dwelling women of Kalidupa, who would hoist the fresh catch up to the dock in buckets. While it was a short boat-ride away, “I only step on land maybe 5, maybe 6 times in a year,” Andar had said. He spoke matter-of-factly, but I imagined an air of disgust.

Andar continued his story: “Because the Naga is like snake he sometime look like (funny movements) coiled, sometimes head here, sometimes head there. Sometimes (more movement) he like that. And the Bajao use that position as sign in the night. It’s like, ah, now the naga head on the west. It’s a sign about the hours. It’s seven o’clock because the naga head still there. 

“I will show you tonight,” said Andar, “the Dragon. The Dragon is in the sky and you can see him at night.”

Here we are, under a coiled Dragon.

The ocean lapped loudly as the tide rolled in.
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Here There Be Dragon

Nate Marcus,Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester, Introduction to Philosophy/Comparative Religion

Description

A sea breeze cut the humidity of the night. It reminded me that in all directions, the sea surrounds Sampela – modest houses on stilts over a shallow seagrass reef – our home for 11 days and to a community of Bajao, or sea gypsies. The sea underneath me rises and drops every eight hours […]

Posted On

11/12/13

Author

Nate Marcus

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    [post_content] => Sampela, Sulawesi, Indonesia

I’ve been thinking a lot about knowledge, and what I know, and what information is actually relevant in life. A few weeks ago, we were sitting by the water in Sawai and Peter began explaining a theory about knowledge.

He held up a black wooden pawn and said, “See this chess piece? This represents everything that you know.” It looked so small in his hand. Next, he reached for an empty plate from lunch. “Now, this dish is everything that you know is still unknown, or are aware of being unknown- like, how the universe got here- questions that have been asked, but that no one really has the answers to.”

He put the plate down and said, “Now imagine the entire planet, planet Earth, but bigger- bigger than anything, ever- that’s how much information exists, how much knowledge is out there- but you don’t know any of it- you don’t even know you don’t know it.”

Jump to yesterday. I picked up a book in Hoga that someone left behind, a cheesy romance about a woman torn between three dashing young men during the Spanish Civil War. Most of it is nonsense, but one line stood out to me, as I was reading on my front porch:

“…the most exquisite kiss imaginable; not that she could have imagined it, it was like trying to imagine heaven, you could only use the things you knew, like harps and clouds and choirs, as ciphers for the things you couldn’t know, until you got there.”

This is how I think I viewed Indonesia, sort of- not as the most exquisite kiss imaginable, but having used only what I knew from previous experiences and previous knowledge to understand my surroundings. In reality, all of the knowledge I brought with me was, like the harps and clouds, just a cipher, a placeholder, for the things I couldn’t understand before arriving. All of my knowledge was and is in that tiny metaphorical chess piece of knowns.

If you asked me what I did today, here in Sampela, the Bajau community, I would say, “Oh, we ‘jalan-jalan’-ed (walked around) for a bit, sat on the porch, and I put some local sunscreen on my face, turning it gold-orange”. If you had told this to me before arriving, I would be both surprised and ready to resign myself to boredom. What do people do all day- do they just sit around? I want to learn! I want to go somewhere! I want to do something! This idea, of doing nothing, would be interpreted, in my mind, with how I would feel at home- restless and looking for something to entertain myself. But that’s a sort of cipher, I guess- using one idea to determine another. It’s one of those parts of life that I couldn’t understand with previous experience. To understand, it must be experienced in real time.

Being here, as a part of the community, I see how life flows differently than at home. If we sit on the porch, we don’t have to be doing anything- not reading, or eating, or even talking. We sit. In the States, ‘doing nothing’ is seen as counterproductive, lazy,  indulgent, whereas here, over the ocean, it makes so much sense to just sit and be- maybe greeting the people who stroll by, or rocking the baby in the bungee-cord net, but mostly sitting. I think that being silent, with just your own thoughts, can make people (including myself) terribly uncomfortable. I haven’t quite got the hang of it, yet- or maybe I haven’t yet fully understood it- but I know that it’s very different from home, and that, in relation to Peter’s theory, it’s part of the metaphorical dish- a known unknown.

Jump to when I was maybe six years old, watching Disney’s Pocahontas for the first time. I was enchanted by the bright colors and smooth movements of the animated people, the lilting voice of the Native American princess as she ran over the hills, singing about the colors of the wind, advising:

“…but if you walk the footsteps of a stranger, you’ll learn things you never knew you never knew…”

The things you never knew you never knew. What do you not know that you don’t know you don’t know? So far, I feel like that’s what I’ve been doing here in Indonesia- learning things I didn’t even know I was ignorant of. For example, we talked for an hour about GMOs one day, before which I didn’t even know what GMOs were. We talked for an hour about what it really means to be masculine or feminine. We talked for an hour about strange facial hair. I went spearfishing in the sea, I chopped down a sago tree (traditional source of food) in the jungle, I’ve had full conversations in Bahasa Indonesia - all examples of unknowns that are now knowns, for me.

Jump to my last day in Louisville. In-between packing and eating, I was reminded by a friend that I still had to make my senior page for the yearbook, as I would be in Indonesia when the deadline ended. I hurriedly looked for a quote to display next to my photo, and quickly chose one which had been given to me last summer. As an afterthought, I wrote it in my journal to carry with me on this trip. It’s by Rilke:

“Do not now seek the answers, which cannot be given to you because you would not be able to live them. And the point is, to live everything. Live the questions now. Perhaps you will then gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answer.”

I always think of this quote, and how it’s saying that the answers aren’t really important- or even guaranteed. The thing that matters, that’s relevant, is that you have questions to begin with. So far on my trip, I think I’ve gained more questions than I have answers; the further off the map we go, the more alien life seems, the more known unknowns begin to form in my mind.  I guess it’s about being comfortable with that greater unknown unknown that is represented by planet Earth, that somehow, Indonesia as a whole represents, too.
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Known Unknowns

Tess Thompson,Best Notes From The Field, Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester, Focus of Inquiry, Homestay

Description

Sampela, Sulawesi, Indonesia I’ve been thinking a lot about knowledge, and what I know, and what information is actually relevant in life. A few weeks ago, we were sitting by the water in Sawai and Peter began explaining a theory about knowledge. He held up a black wooden pawn and said, “See this chess piece? […]

Posted On

11/11/13

Author

Tess Thompson

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    [post_content] => Lose a bet once or twice

Living in a fisher’s paradise

People here are all too nice

As packs a day go to thrice

 

First thing in the morning: check the net

Haul in some fish without breaking a sweat

Then billiards shack, make a bet

Give that child another cigarette

 

Spend mid-day eating fish and rice

Living in a fisher’s paradise

And if the cats kill all the mice

I will live here all my life

 

Feed my turtle, and the cat

It can’t survive on a diet of just rat

Chat with a friend on a plastic mat

His fish are dead from plastic wrap

 

Lose a bet once or twice

Living in a fisher’s paradise

People here are all too nice

As packs a day go to thrice

Spend all day eating fish and rice

Living in a fisher’s paradise

And if the cats kill all the mice

I will live here all my life
    [post_title] => A Fisher's Paradise
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A Fisher’s Paradise

David (Fish) Korst ,Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

Description

Lose a bet once or twice Living in a fisher’s paradise People here are all too nice As packs a day go to thrice   First thing in the morning: check the net Haul in some fish without breaking a sweat Then billiards shack, make a bet Give that child another cigarette   Spend mid-day […]

Posted On

11/11/13

Author

David (Fish) Korst

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[post_title] => A few photos from Masihulan [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => a-few-photos-from-masihulan [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-03 14:51:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-03 21:51:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://wheretherebedragons.com/?p=94316 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 208 [name] => Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester [slug] => indonesia-fall-2013-semester [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 208 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 240 [count] => 75 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 11.1 [cat_ID] => 208 [category_count] => 75 [category_description] => [cat_name] => Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester [category_nicename] => indonesia-fall-2013-semester [category_parent] => 240 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2013/indonesia-fall-2013-semester/ ) ) [category_links] => Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester )
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A few photos from Masihulan

Shannon Lindow ,Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

Description

Posted On

11/6/13

Author

Shannon Lindow

WP_Post Object
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    [post_date] => 2013-11-06 17:06:48
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    [post_content] => As I disembark the goliath Pelni ship at 11pm, climbing down its seven stories of stairs, I look

out at the sea of humanity below that clamors and shouts, jockeying to get closer to the Indonesian

vessel as it empties. I am pushed and prodded from all sides, and swept with the human current, which

appeared to be ceaselessly flowing from each deck, down to the dock. The cacophony of yells, grumbles,

and innumerable dialects of the Archipelago mixes with a subtler energy given off by the heat of this

large mass in unmanaged motion. The sources of eerie illumination to reveal this process are the yellows

of the southern hemisphere's stars, the reds and blues of countless motorbikes' rear lights, and the

orange floodlights which cast a long looming shadow of the Pelni over the shallow reef. The main deck of

the burgeoning Pelni, with all of its sounds and lights, seems the stage of some bizarre sold-out rock

concert. I reach the ground level, and, it seemed, in all of this commotion, that the throngs of people

would, at any second, overwhelm the line of us Dragons students tryirg to navigate our way through.

Right then I recede into my brain and remove myself entirely from the environment around me.

In an amazing contrast of sound and surrounding, I found myself reliving my morning three days earlier

(on the 1st of November). I am in the interior jungle of Seram crossing a bubblirg knee deep stream on

the back of Sony. I fight back a schoolboy laugh as the gentle giant of Masihulan noiselessly gives my

heavy six foot three body a piggy-back ride to the far shore. I should back up and explain the

circumstances of this crossing a bit. I had cut my foot on coral two weeks prior in Sawai, and although my

cut had been healing well in Masihulan, the damp and bacleria-filled jungle had given my foot a nasty

infection. With my left foot quickly morphing from slight puffiness and redness to a more serious infection,

the I-team and I decided that I should leave jungle camp a day early to get antibiotics in

Masohi. So to keep my giant left foot out of the water Sony now gallantly waded me across the stream.

During our three hour hikewe got along famously, talking about kebuns (forest gardens), hunting, and

church, but we also had hiked for times in silence, mutually loving the serenity that comes from a

voiceless rainforest. Sony helps me off of his back with a grunt. I thank him and ask if there are any more

streams to cross. He says there will be two more! We clasp hands - half high five half hand shake- and

grinning together we step over the round river rocks, setting off through the dense friendly jungle.

 

PS: For my lovely parents, I finished my course of antibiotics for my foot this afternoon and I am

nearly back at , 100%, sorry for leaving a cliffhanger about my foot in my last email. I will be staying out of

the ocean for the first few days of Sampela until by cut has completely healed up. Love Wake

 
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Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

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The Pelni and The Jungle

Wake Maeder-York,Indonesia Fall 2013 Semester

Description

As I disembark the goliath Pelni ship at 11pm, climbing down its seven stories of stairs, I look out at the sea of humanity below that clamors and shouts, jockeying to get closer to the Indonesian vessel as it empties. I am pushed and prodded from all sides, and swept with the human current, which […]

Posted On

11/6/13

Author

Wake Maeder-York

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