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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012


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Banana Dessert

Ingredients:

-6 bananas

-granulated white sugar

-3 eggs

-enough flour

-enough oil

Recipe:

1. Cut bananas into fourths; soak in mixture of eggs and flour

2. Heat up oil in wok

3. Fry bananas until brown; remove bananas and oil from wok

4. Melt sugar with minimal oil; introduce bananas and roll around in sugar

5. Remove when fully covered and separate from each other

Tips:

-The oil is hot when little bits of it “pop” up

-For the egg & flour mixture: keep adding flour until it seems thick enough

-Don’t burn the sugar; heat until liquid and no more

Tofu Omelet

Ingredients:

-5”x5” block of tofu

-4 eggs

-enough oil

Recipe:

1. Cut tofu into slices .5” thick; fry in oil until both sides turn brown

2. Scramble eggs; lay tofu slices down tessellated to each other; pour eggs over

3. Cook until omelet-esque nature

4. Optional – add softened peas and carrot pieces on top

Jiaozi -饺子(Dumplings)

Ingredients:

-small block of raw pork

-chives

-carrots

-shallots

-flour

-eggs

Recipe:

1. Cut pork into very thin slices (1” long); dice all vegetables; mix pork and vegetables

2. Make dough (mix eggs and flour in correct proportion); roll into tube with 1” radius; cut tube into 1” long pieces

3. Roll dough pieces into flat circles

4. Place circle into non-dominant hand; add small ball of pork/vegetable mix; dip finger in water and rub around edge of dough (acts as glue); fold two sides together into crescent shape

5. Boil in water until cooked (taste test to determine if done)

Tips:

-Can also add another other vegetables you want

-Can substitute any other meat or make it vegetarian

-Other cooking alternatives: deep fry in small vat of oil, sauté in a small amount of oil, or steam/fry by frying bottoms and steaming with a pot lid on top of the wok

Rice & Pork Balls

Ingredients:

-lotus root

-raw rice

-ground pork

Recipe:

1. Cut lotus root into 1” cubes

2. Cover with pork; roll into ball

3. Roll meat ball in raw rice until completely covered; steam cook

Tips:

-Cover with enough meat so lotus root is covered, but no more

-Any other crunchy vegetable can be substituted

-Easiest way to prepare is with two flat pans: one for meat balls to be covered in rice and one for finished balls

Egg & Tomato Salad (西红柿炒鸡蛋)

Ingredients:

-3 eggs

-1 tomato

-enough oil

Recipe:

1. Cut tomato into sixteenths

2. Scramble eggs in bowl; cook in minimal oil until fully cooked

3. Introduce tomato pieces; cook until sauce forms (longer than you’d think)

Tips:

-Break egg into small pieces when mixing with tomato

-The sauce will form faster if everything sits in the middle

Corn & Beans

Ingredients:

-cup of corn

-cup of raw beans (edamame)

-enough oil

Recipe:

1. Boil beans in water until fully cooked (taste test)

2. Move beans into bowl with cold water; remove bean skins (mix around with fingers and they’ll rise to the surface)

3. Add beans and corn into wok with oil until done

Potato Pancake

Ingredients:

-1 potato

-enough oil

Recipe:

1. Cut potato in small strips (.1”x.1”x 2”)

2. Heat up some oil

3. Place pile of strips in pancake shape in middle of wok

4. Let cook; flip; let cook

Tips:

-Varying the density of the strips changes the texture (i.e thinner = crispier)

-Best thickness is .5”

-Easiest to eat if each person has their own or cut into pizza slices

Mantou -馒头(small steamed buns)

Ingredients:

-1 tbsp instant yeast

-4 cups flour

-1 tbsp sugar (optional)

Recipe:

1. Mix yeast and flour; add warm water until dough is formed

2. Knead for a long time (about 7 minutes); add the optional sugar

3. Roll into large ball; put into bigger bowl; lay damp towel on top and tuck around dough; cover bowl with plastic wrap (poke small hole in plastic wrap)

4. Leave overnight at room temperature

5. Put on floured cutting board

6. Roll into long tube (diameter determines size of mantou; around 2” is good)

7. Cut off squares; mold into mantou shape

8. Steam for 30 minutes

Tips:

-This recipe can be converted to make baozi by adding jiaozi filling inside mantou balls before steaming

Rachel’s Fried Rice

Ingredients:

-2kg rice

-3 big green peppers

-2 big red peppers

-2 carrots

-1 chicken breast

-2 potatoes

-1 egg

-curry powder

Recipe:

1. Cook rice; cut all vegetables and chicken into small cubes

2. Sauté chicken; add curry; remove

3. Scramble egg and cook; remove

4. Cook tough vegetables (potato and carrot); when softened, add peppers

5. Add chicken and egg to vegetables; slowly add rice and mix

6. Done when ratio between rice and other ingredients looks right

Banana Pancake (a la Bobo’s)

Ingredients:

-bananas

-eggs

-sugar

-dough

Recipe:

1. Make dough; flatten into 2 pancakes 8”x 8”

2. Mix eggs and mushed bananas into paste

3. Lay down one pancake; slather mixture on top (.5” thick); lay second pancake on top

4. Fold four sides in; fold in half

5. Cook in oil until dough is crispy; add sugar on top

Egg-Covered Corn

Ingredients:

-2 cups raw corn

-2 eggs

-enough oil

Recipe:

1. Sauté corn in wok until done

2. Scramble eggs in bowl and add

3. Mix together until eggs cooked

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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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My Chinese Cookbook

Kira Tebbe,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

Description

Banana Dessert Ingredients: -6 bananas -granulated white sugar -3 eggs -enough flour -enough oil Recipe: 1. Cut bananas into fourths; soak in mixture of eggs and flour 2. Heat up oil in wok 3. Fry bananas until brown; remove bananas and oil from wok 4. Melt sugar with minimal oil; introduce bananas and roll around […]

Posted On

12/12/12

Author

Kira Tebbe

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...Listen to these songs, watch these movies, and read these books!

I miss you all! As promised, here's the list of the music, movies, and books we mentioned on the trip. Enjoy them!

Music

Songs:

Jailer (Asa)
Homage Beyonce)
Wonderful Tonight (Eric Clapton)
Love Always Remains (MGMT)
Everywhere (Michelle Branch)
Halfway Gone (Lifehouse)
Josey (Hey Monday)
Why Can’t I (Liz Phair)
My Favorite Mistake (Sheryl Crow)
Your Song (Elton John)
1980 (Rehab)
And We Danced (Macklemore)
Fotografia (Juanes & Nelly Furtado)
Everlasting Light (The Black Keys)
Broken Bells (an album)
Welcome Home Son (Radical Face)
Manu Chao (Me Gustas Tu)
For What It’s Worth (Buffalo Springfield)
Deliverance (Bubba Sparxxx)
Killing Me Softly (The Fugees)
Ready or Not (The Fugees)
Bowl of Oranges (Bright Eyes)
Misery (Maroon 5)
I’ll Be Waiting (Adele)
White Houses (Vanessa Carlton)
Hello, I Love You (The Doors)
Aicha (Khaled)
Papa Was a Rolling Stone (The Temptations)
Tell Me Lies (Ashley Tisdale)
Botten Anna (Basshunter)
Amazing (Aerosmith)
Another One Bites the Dust (Queen)
Another Place to Fall (KT Tunstall)
Antartica (The Weepies)
After Midnight (Eric Clapton)
All My Loving (Jim Sturgess)
All of the Trees of the Field Will Clap Their Hands (Sufjian Stevens)
Grace Kelly (Mika)
Kind and Generous (Natalie Merchant)
Graceland (the album)

Pumped Up Kicks (Foster the People)

Meadowlarks (Fleet Foxes)

San Andreas Fault (Natalie Merchant)


Artists:

The Palmer Squares
Counting Crows
August Coupe & The Interns
The Band Eclipse
Basshunter (All I Ever Wanted)
Madeleine Peyroux
Slai
Shy’m (Veiller tard)
Amy Macdonald
Jim Jarmush
Imogen Heap
Dmitri Shostakovich
Frank Ocean
Cat Stevens
Bon Iver (Woods)
Mumford & Sons
Joni Mitchell
Brett Dennen
Belle and Sebastian
Carol King
Dar Williams
Blitzen Trapper
John Pride
Laura Grimm
Nina Simon
Joni Mitchell

The Fugees


Movies

Midnight in Paris
The Four Horsemen
Osmosis Jones
Blues Brothers
Monty Python
Cool Runnings
Forrest Gump
Once
Good Will Hunting
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
The Postman Always Rings Twice
Chinatown
Dead Poet Society
Harold and Maude
My Cousin Vinny
A Fish Called Wanda
American Beauty
The Sting
Raising Arizona
Bridge Over the River Kwai
Empire of the Sun
The Tempest
Coriolanus
Casablanca
The Network
The Maltese Falcon
North by Northwest
Forgetting Sarah Marshall
Buck
Fargo
Exit Through the Gift Shop
The 5th Element
A Summer Pasture
Son of Babylon
Green Papaya
A Beautiful Mind

Film Directors:

Wes Anderson
Coen Brothers

Books

The Last Flight of the Scarlet Macaw
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
The Snow Leopard
Catch 22
The Golden Compass
The Historian

Feel free to add any others!

Also, here's my gratitude list that I wrote to appreciate being home/ cope with being away from China and y'all:

An oven that bakes brownies perfectly, playing a tuned piano, my grandfather's encouraging laugh, Demo's rice pudding, stepping into fresh cool air after being in a heated house, the smell of grass, time to dictate my own schedule, youtube.

Hope everyone's transition out of China has been smooth. Looking forward to keeping in touch.

Best,

Alexis

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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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If you don’t know what to do at home…

Alexis Cheney,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

Description

…Listen to these songs, watch these movies, and read these books! I miss you all! As promised, here’s the list of the music, movies, and books we mentioned on the trip. Enjoy them! Music Songs: Jailer (Asa)Homage Beyonce)Wonderful Tonight (Eric Clapton)Love Always Remains (MGMT)Everywhere (Michelle Branch)Halfway Gone (Lifehouse)Josey (Hey Monday)Why Can’t I (Liz Phair)My Favorite […]

Posted On

12/8/12

Author

Alexis Cheney

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    [post_title] => Scenes of Weizhou island
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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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Scenes of Weizhou island

I-team,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

Description

Posted On

12/6/12

Author

I-team

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    [post_content] => December 6th. The date we knew would have us part ways and still upon arrival it is hard to accept. Our group mantra these past few days has been its not the end, it is a new beginning. We begin again- back into the throws of the unknown. This beast, the unknown, had send us to China to explore. What has China taught us? Or what has travel taught us?

Travel is the ultimate expression of traversing the unknown; there is no attainable goal, life is full of powerful hellos and goodbyes, the shifting ground keeps you constantly on your toes, awake, alert, alive. To travel is to practice living impermanently.And yet, these memories we've created together feel so permanent, so important we don't want to let go.

How can we keep these bonds and these relationships? How can we sustain living life this fully in routine? How do we share this experience with our loved ones?So many questions, but this time our thoughts welcome a smile. We love our questions, our insecurities, our vulnerabilities because on the course of this semester they've served to bring us to rich exciting places.

As we part ways today, we are overwhelmed by feelings of great fortune, great exhaustion (late nights soaking in each others company), and mostly great anticipation for that new unknown. We open our arms to you.

Thank you for an indescribable journey. (Though we'll do our best to practice communicating these feelings and sharing our stories. We've learned some stuff, haven't we?)


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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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A New Beginning

Talia Brooks-Salzman,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

Description

December 6th. The date we knew would have us part ways and still upon arrival it is hard to accept. Our group mantra these past few days has been its not the end, it is a new beginning. We begin again- back into the throws of the unknown. This beast, the unknown, had send us […]

Posted On

12/6/12

Author

Talia Brooks-Salzman

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    [post_title] => A Day with Monks in Ruili Photos 2
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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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A Day with Monks in Ruili Photos 2

Alexis Cheney ,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

Description

Posted On

12/5/12

Author

Alexis Cheney

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    [post_title] => A Day with Monks in Ruili Photos 1
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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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A Day with Monks in Ruili Photos 1

Alexis Cheney,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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Posted On

12/5/12

Author

Alexis Cheney

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What have I learned from China?

Justin eating a Beijing burrito instead of the infamous 烤鸭 – the pressure to feast on the local cuisine leaves after true, cultural integration. A 90 day visa – don’t waste a single hour. A pressure to see, a pressure to hear, a pressure to live – a pressure to not be yourself. You feel upset? Feel better, the time will fly. You feel sad? Feel happy, others would love to be in your shoes. Do the big things, live stories worth sharing, climb that goddamn mountain. Be surrounded by events that make you feel small, insignificant – is it you really there?

Train lines, taxi rides, ambling on the sidewalk – the real Chinese experience. I yearn for the normal moments; the intermediaries that fill the gaps between the significant. The ones lacking intention, done out of necessity. Debating between Pizza Hut and Dai food, only your stomach pressuring you to decide. Scratching ink onto paper to counteract the imperfect human memory. Avoiding renouned 烧烤 because it made you sick that one night in Beihai. Moving with the Chinese at their own pace; learning from within. Put the pressure to interrogate aside; the pressure to attain surreal memories aside. The best way to walk in their shoes is to follow their path, not up a mountain but to the market, to a 网吧, to their next destination. Wait with them at the bus stop, train station, check-out line at Carrefour.

Walk to the market, but not while being blinded by purpose. Notice the periphery and stop for conversation. Ask for a cheaper price, answer “Yes, I’m American.” Curiosity ends with a lens to the face; let your eyes document the moments and remove the tempting technological barrier. Be yourself and others will want to meet you. Don’t drown in the unique; flourish in the mundane. Boredom only is given a chance to arise when you forget that others are living right alongside you; an unrestricted and impermeable collective called the human race. Strive for those spontaneous stops, that vase seller or beaming old man. It is this way that you can find yourself – live another way of life to realize you were living all along.

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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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Burritos and Pizza Hut

Kira Tebbe,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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What have I learned from China? Justin eating a Beijing burrito instead of the infamous 烤鸭 – the pressure to feast on the local cuisine leaves after true, cultural integration. A 90 day visa – don’t waste a single hour. A pressure to see, a pressure to hear, a pressure to live – a pressure […]

Posted On

12/5/12

Author

Kira Tebbe

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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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A Day with Monks in Ruili Photos 3

Alexis Cheney,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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Posted On

12/5/12

Author

Alexis Cheney

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Well… here we are. The mornings have become cold. Our two lovers have run south. And our icarus thoughts have bent inwards again towards old pain and new tears, farewells and returns. This, the tide of our laughing habits, our emotioned bliss; cyclical. We are gathering our selves, doing what we can with the thoughts that we have. For there is, among this peace that we’ve become, a silent ache. And so I write this yak under the cover of night. Weave and growing under the hands of those that I have come to love, under the self that I have come to know, and under a sky, clouded by a cold december wind.

Those Karakul and kashgar streets are ebbing of course, far removed from our awkward gazes. As does the great wall, lurking in its own dark, and that Wei Zhou island, and the dog, Tygone. We reside between these places, islands and continents. We are, before this final return, more liminal than before. For our group is losing its apendages, crying its last lot to this highest bidder – the past – who we know.

Last night I told a brother that I came here to remember who I was. He knew before I did. For I could not look into my own eyes. Last night, with honest branches of their hands, this group christened me new, looking into my flesh with palms of validation. I felt myself grow beneath them. And I felt their’s grow beneath mine as we took our turns to speak. I cannot explain what has occurred here in terms of an understandable nature. You do not know our cave, nor the river that yawns beside it. But you know us. And upon our arrival home, you will see. And if you listen you will hear. And if you believe, you will know -- we are not as we once became. For we are the peregrine of this mimesis, not so lost in our wanderings as one year ago, but yet again sat down before the typing present of this immediate nation. Thank you Mr. Yager. Thank you Justin. Thank you Rachel. Thank you Talia. I now reside where there are dragons.

Will

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China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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Where there are dragons

William Foster Hallett,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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Well… here we are. The mornings have become cold. Our two lovers have run south. And our icarus thoughts have bent inwards again towards old pain and new tears, farewells and returns. This, the tide of our laughing habits, our emotioned bliss; cyclical. We are gathering our selves, doing what we can with the thoughts […]

Posted On

12/4/12

Author

William Foster Hallett

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    [post_content] => We could not have planned the day more perfectly. Eliza, Chloe, Kira and I took a cab to a monastery 20 minutes away from our hotel. We walked around the temple before entering it. We came across plants whose leaves contract when touched, a classroom, a Buddah statue with a unique hand gesture, and peacock-shaped bushes. When we walked inside, Noah, a 30 year old monk from Myanmar, greeted us. Noah invited us over to sit in the corner of the room and offered us fresh fruit and sweets. Having skipped breakfast, I enthusiastically accepted them. While we munched, he expressed his joy on the reelection of President Obama based on Obama’s fluency in foreign relations. He believes Obama knows how to deal with people whereas Romney only knows how to deal with money. We also discussed his American friend, Emily, who taught him English, his daily schedule, and Myanmar-China relations. After chatting for about 15 minutes, we walked outside to the pond to feed the fish. He gave us each a whole box of sweet biscuits to feed them. We enjoyed basking in the sun while watching the fish poke their mouths out of water to catch biscuits. Still hungry, I ate a few of the biscuits myself. Noah noticed and exclaimed, “I pity you. You are so hungry!” He then asked us about our plans for the rest of the day and when we replied in vague terms he offered to take us to his favorite spots. Before doing so, he kindly loaded our bags with drinks and green-onion crackers. We then walked to a nearby store and sat outside of it while he arranged for cars to pick us up. When they arrived, we hopped in and commenced our adventure! (Alexis)

We left the monastery in two cars packed with monks and arrived at a roadside restaurant, stocked with many raw vegetables. The monks asked us to choose which we liked, and to our surprise, the restaurant owners (friends of the monks) treated us to a five-dish, delicious meal. We were sure to leave what amount of money we thought was appropriate on the table, but we were so amazed by the continued generosity of everyone we'd met. After the restaurant, we visited three monasteries and received tours from the monk residents themselves, who detailed the buildings' histories and patiently described for us the meanings of beautiful murals painted on wood panels. At each location we visited, we were greeted with wide smiles and plenty of fruit and water. In passing moments, we students laughed among ourselves in our joy and disbelief about the enormous kindness of the community. As we moved from place to place sharing the backseats of the cars with our ebullient new friends, we exchanged stories and backgrounds with them. Noah kept telling us, "I’m so happy you are here. We are so lucky to be together today. We are from different countries, but I feel that we are brothers and sisters." (Chloe)

The itinerary the monk had planned out for us also included a beautiful wooden temple on stilts. What was special about this temple was the Dai festival going on in its courtyard. We were greeted by the sounds of a monk reading sacred Buddhist scriptures, his voice being broadcast through a series of speakers out into the courtyard and mixed in the festive banging of drums and cymbals of the musicians in the center of the courtyard. Dancers encircled the musicians, turning in and out while twisting their wrists rhythmically to the music. The dancers were all women, with one or two exceptions, and all dressed in matching outfits of various colors. They formed turning circles of blue, green, yellow, purple, and more, with each ring of dancers getting smaller as they approached the musicians. Here we sat on benches eating roasted chestnuts (which Kira nicely shared with all of us), watching the dancers. New girls would join the circles while tired ones would chat by the wayside or grab a bite to eat. After we had been looking around the temple and watching the festival for a bit, taking photos the whole time a man came up to us and wanted to take a photo of us which in turn lead to a series ootos were not done therf people taking turns standing next to us getting their photo taken. But the photos were not done there. The monks who had taken us there wanted a photo of us in the small crossroad with the temple and dancing in the background. We all lined up and smiled as the photo was taken. The monks told us to have a rest and they disappeared for a moment. When they reappeared, low and behold, a massive laminated copy of the photo they had taken with us emerged. Still in disbelief about the giant photo of us they planned to hang in their temple we climbed back into the vans, off to our next destination. (Eliza)

After the festival, we arrived at yet another monastery, myself wondering how I would distinguish them all apart. To my great surprise, this worry instantly faded. After quickly peeking inside, we walked around to the back to find a courtyard and a long, two-story building resembling a boarding school. Outside in the courtyard were approximately seventy “novices” – monks ages seven to thirteen. Dressed in the traditional, Theravada orange robes tied into confortable shorts, these boys played ping-pong on tables near the showers, had a riveting game of basketball in a court nearby, and shaved each other’s heads if a buzz cut started to appear. (One poor kid had a half-dozen pieces of tissue dotting his scalp – I guess somebody was new with the razor.) Also following tradition, the kids wore no shoes, but we found them all stacked on a pile of firewood. I asked for a ping-pong match against one of them, to which one kid shyly agreed. I didn’t score a single point and as I thanked them and left the table they began their animated chatter, assuring me they were just normal boys. All of them came to the monastery as a kind of specialized boarding school. Their abbot explained that instead of geography or biology, the students learn Poly (an ancient Buddhist language), Chinese, Burmese, how to eat properly, speak mindfully, carry themselves in the best manner, and treat all others with respect. Though these latter lessons were hard to find on the basketball court. They were ruthless. And good.

After a few minutes watching them, we kept walking around the complex to two large shrines. The first included over a dozen large statues, approximately eight feet high, representing Buddha’s followers or disciples. They were all positioned along stairs, seemingly walking down towards an equally large Buddha statue. At the base of the stairs was another statue in a praying position, asking to be reincarnated into the Buddha. About thirty feet away was an even larger shrine, consisting of a golden edifice with small openings in the side for incense and offerings. When we arrived at the top of the stairs that led up to it, the sun was just beginning to set, and we could see Burmese buildings in the not-too-distant horizon. The beautiful landscape inspired us to take more photos with each other, though the monk’s photographed stoic expressions didn’t match their often jovial dispositions. (Kira)

As the sun began to set, we invited all three monks out to dinner, not wanting to part just yet. Justin tagged along and we went to Bobo’s, our favorite shop for banana pancakes and fruit smoothies. As we reveled over the past few hours, the abbot of the school sat by me and explained many things about the monastic life. This 28-year-old first joined the monastery at seventeen since it coincided with his desired way of life. He then explained two different Buddhist philosophies. The first one describes the four types of people, independent of environment of financial status:
  1. Those who care for others but not for themselves.
  2. Those who care for themselves but not for others.
  3. Those who neither care for themselves nor for others.
  4. Those who care for both themselves and for others.
He went on to say how many people fall under the first three categories, but he as a monk, and as we all as human beings, should strive to fulfill the fourth. His second lesson explained the three parts of yourself you must always be mindful of:
  1. Mouth and tongue – one must monitor both content and the manner in which it’s spoken
  2. Hands and feet – using caution in maneuvering and carrying oneself, one must also evoke proper body language
  3. Heart – one must strive to respect all beings, keep judgments to a minimum, and live warmly
But I did not only learn from his spoken lessons, but by how he himself acted. He spoke with such purpose and efficiency, weighing each word to ensure the proper meaning came across. When answering my question of what he teaches his novices, he noticed I didn’t fully understand his Chinese. Instead of continuing to speak to no real listener or trying to confusingly circumlocute, he paused, waited until Justin finished what he was saying to somebody else, and then replied to him to translate. When walking back to the hostel to say our final goodbyes, I noticed how he implemented these lessons in his life – his steps were cautious and precise. To put it simply, he walked with the air of a monk, which I couldn’t pinpoint until I met him. Interestingly enough, before leaving he gave me his QQ number, China’s most popular social networking site. It’s like a monk being on Facebook! (Kira) Overall, we had a blast discovering Ruili with the monks. They took us for a heck of a ride that will forever remind us that an openness to people, rather than a relentless devotion to an itinerary, paves the way for exhilerating journeys. [post_title] => A Day with Monks in Ruili [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => a-day-with-monks-in-ruili [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2012-12-04 00:00:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 1970-01-01 00:00:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://yakyak.chandigarhsoftware.com/?p=39337 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [categories] => Array ( [0] => WP_Term Object ( [term_id] => 280 [name] => China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012 [slug] => china-south-of-the-clouds-semester-fall-2012 [term_group] => 0 [term_taxonomy_id] => 280 [taxonomy] => category [description] => [parent] => 243 [count] => 87 [filter] => raw [term_order] => 14.1 [cat_ID] => 280 [category_count] => 87 [category_description] => [cat_name] => China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012 [category_nicename] => china-south-of-the-clouds-semester-fall-2012 [category_parent] => 243 [link] => https://my.wheretherebedragons.com/category/fall-2012/china-south-of-the-clouds-semester-fall-2012/ ) ) [category_links] => China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012 )

China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

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A Day with Monks in Ruili

Alexis, Chloe, Eliza, & Kira ,China: South of the Clouds Semester, Fall 2012

Description

We could not have planned the day more perfectly. Eliza, Chloe, Kira and I took a cab to a monastery 20 minutes away from our hotel. We walked around the temple before entering it. We came across plants whose leaves contract when touched, a classroom, a Buddah statue with a unique hand gesture, and peacock-shaped […]

Posted On

12/4/12

Author

Alexis, Chloe, Eliza, & Kira

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